[FPSPACE] SS1 to go for X-Prize Monday morning

spacenews at lineone.net spacenews at lineone.net
Mon Oct 4 01:17:10 EDT 2004


Hey!

Some of us older Brits don't actually like the metric system (foisted on us
by our European partners) and are glad we still use good old miles and yards
and feet rather than km, m and cms. That way you know where you are and
don't run into planets prematurely........

Oddly, we do use metric for all weights - and boy, does that confuse me.
Don't even get me started on Centigrade vs Farhenheit ........




-----Original Message-----
From: fpspace-bounces at friends-partners.org
[mailto:fpspace-bounces at friends-partners.org] On Behalf Of Constantine
Domashnev
Sent: 04 October 2004 05:01
To: fpspace at friends-partners.org
Subject: Re: [FPSPACE] SS1 to go for X-Prize Monday morning

Dear Dr Dwayne Day:

Im Daylight Saving Time units, 14 hundred Zulu is 10AM Eastern and 7AM
Pacific.

Otherwise, 14 hours of Greenwich equals to 9 hours of EST (and 6 hours of
PST).

These Brits with their confusing Metric system ... !!!
--
Constantine 






On Sun, 2004-10-03 at 23:11, DwayneDay wrote:
> http://www.spaceflightnow.com/ss1/status.html
> 
> Takeoff expected at 1400 GMT (11AM East Coast time, 8AM West Coast), with
ignition an hour later.
> 
> 
> Also this:
> 
> http://www.spaceflightnow.com/ss1/041002rolls.html
> 
> "While the first roll occurred at a high true speed, about 2.7 Mach, the
aerodynamic loads were quite low (120 knots equivalent airspeed) and were
decreasing rapidly, so the ship never saw any significant structural
stresses. The reason that there were so many rolls was because shortly after
they started, Mike was approaching the extremities of the atmosphere. Nearly
all of the 29 rolls that followed the initial departure were basically at
near-zero-q, thus they were a continuous rolling motion without aerodynamic
damping, rather than the airplane-like aerodynamic rolls seen by an
aerobatic airplane. In other words, they were more like space flight than
they were like airplane flight. Thus, Mike could not damp the motions with
his aerodynamic flight controls. 
> 
> "Mike elected to wait until he feathered the boom-tail in space, before
using the reaction control system thrusters (RCS) to damp the roll rate.
When he finally started to damp the rates he did so successfully and
promptly. The RCS damping, to a stable attitude without significant angular
rates was complete well before the ship reached apogee (337,600 feet, or 103
Km). That gave mike time to relax, note his peak altitude, and then pick up
a digital high-resolution camera and take some great photos out the windows.
Those photos are now being considered for publication by a major magazine."
> 
> 
> 
> While all of this sounds plausible, I'm confused (and a little annoyed)
that Rutan doesn't explain why it rolled in the first place, instead saying
that they will explain that later in a detailed report.  That just seems
weird.  Why not just state the cause?  It's not like it is a trade secret or
anything.
> 
> 
> 
> DDAY
> 
> 
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> FPSPACE mailing list
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> 
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