[FPSPACE] Re: FPSPACE Digest, Vol 8, Issue 3

John Logsdon logsdon at gwu.edu
Sun Oct 3 17:34:19 EDT 2004


Janice,

I am in Vancouver, BC all week for the IAF Congress. You might contact Lori Garver.

JML

John M. Logsdon
Director, Space Policy Institute
Elliott School of International Affairs
George Washington University
Suite 403
1957 E Street NW
Washington, DC 20052
phone - (202)994-7292   fax - (202)994-1639
www.gwu.edu/~spi

----- Original Message -----
From: fpspace-request at friends-partners.org
Date: Sunday, October 3, 2004 12:00 pm
Subject: FPSPACE Digest, Vol 8, Issue 3

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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Re: Military Role in Space Control: A Primer (Allen Thomson)
>   2. RE: X-Prize -- Lindburgh's aircraft was never scaled up	to
>      become a passenger airliner. (Spellman James Civ 60MDG/PA)
>   3. Re: Military Role in Space Control: A Primer (Allen Thomson)
>   4. Re: RE: X-Prize -- Lindburgh's aircraft was never scaled	up
>      to become a passenger airliner. (DwayneDay)
>   5. Re: Fate of Genesis bus (Marc D. Rayman)
>   6. China at the IAF Congress (DwayneDay)
> 
> 
> -------------------------------------------------------------------
> ---
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 11:34:04 -0500
> From: "Allen Thomson" <thomsona at flash.net>
> Subject: Re: [FPSPACE] Military Role in Space Control: A Primer
> To: "fpspace" <fpspace at friends-partners.org>
> Message-ID: <00b101c4a89d$a29a9cb0$230110ac at HOMEBECQ7509O8>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> 	reply-type=original
> 
> 
> > MILITARY ROLE IN SPACE CONTROL (CRS)
> 
> See also the recent "Counterspace Operations", 
> http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/afdd2_2_1.pdf
> 
> (I forget whether this was mentioned here earlier.)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 12:09:14 -0500
> From: "Spellman James Civ 60MDG/PA" <James.Spellman at travis.af.mil>
> Subject: [FPSPACE] RE: X-Prize -- Lindburgh's aircraft was never
> 	scaled up	to become a passenger airliner.
> To: <fpspace at friends-partners.org>
> Message-ID:
> 	<BC77E301B1E1364EA5827E0C96F0260B370958 at xdmtamcw2ms901.amc.ds.af.mil>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="us-ascii"
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: "Keith Gottschalk" <kgottschalk at uwc.ac.za>
> Date: Sat, 02 Oct 2004 11:28:22 
> To:<fpspace at friends-partners.org>
> Subject: [FPSPACE] Ticket prices; X prizes
> 
> Quoting Keith --
> 	"From a question to a reflection. Everyone  makes the connection
> between the X prize and the prize Lindburgh won. But Lindburgh's
> aircraft was never scaled up to become a passenger airliner.  I do not
> know if the company that built it ever became serious players in the
> airliner industry."
> 
> 
> This might help. . .
> ~JS~
> 
> Ryan Aeronautical Company
> 
> T. Claude Ryan, best known for building the plane that Charles 
> Lindberghflew in his famous 1927 transatlantic flight, was born in 
> Kansas in
> 1898. He learned to fly in 1917, was trained by the U.S. Army Air 
> Corps,and served with the U.S. Aerial Forest Patrol. In 1922 he 
> establishedthe Ryan Flying School and a business in San Diego, 
> California, for
> flying sightseers around town. In April 1925, needing capital, Ryan
> became partners with Benjamin Franklin Mahoney and formed Ryan 
> Airlines.The company converted war surplus aircraft for civil use, 
> rebuildingStandard open-cockpit biplanes to cabin transports. Ryan 
> also acquired
> the Douglas Cloudster and used it as a passenger plane after modifying
> it to accommodate passengers in an enclosed cabin. He designed and 
> builtabout 40 M-1 and M-2 mail/passenger transports in 1926. 
> 
> Ryan sold his interest in the company to Mahoney in 1926 but 
> stayed on
> to manage the company. In early 1927, a group of St. Louis investors
> asked Ryan if he could build a plane for a nonstop transatlantic trip
> within 60 days. He accepted the challenge and produced the Spirit 
> of St.
> Louis, which Charles Lindbergh flew across the Atlantic. Ryan, 
> however,had no financial stake in the company and did not receive 
> much in the
> way of tangible rewards. 
> 
> Mahoney formed the Mahoney-Ryan Aircraft Corporation in St. Louis,
> Missouri, in 1928, to capitalize on Ryan's name. The new company
> produced a number of airplanes but was acquired by the holding company
> Detroit Aircraft Corporation in May 1929. Detroit folded the next year
> and sold the factory in October 1930.
> 
> Meanwhile, also in 1926, Ryan had established a separate, Ryan
> Aeronautical Company, primarily to import Siemens aircraft engines 
> fromGermany. In 1928, Siemens, which wished to establish its own
> distributorship in the United States, bought Ryan out for $75,000. 
> 
> With the money he received from Siemens, Ryan started a flying 
> school in
> May 1928, and formed the Ryan School of Aeronautics on June 5, 
> 1931. On
> May 26, 1934, he formed a new Ryan Aeronautical Company, and the 
> schooleventually became a subsidiary. 
> 
> The first design by the new company was the Ryan ST. The prototype's
> first flight took place from Lindbergh Field on June 8, 1934. The 
> ST was
> a two-seat, open-cockpit aircraft with fabric-covered braced low-wings
> and an all-metal fuselage. A 95 horsepower (71-horsepower) inline 
> enginepowered it, giving the ST a top speed of almost 140 miles 
> per hour (225
> kilometers per hour). With its exceptional handling and speed, the ST
> caused a minor sensation at the time. However, only five were 
> produced.Less than a year later, the STA appeared. Powered by a 
> 125-horsepower
> (93-kilowatt) engine, this model set a number of light plane speed and
> altitude records and also won the 1937 International Aerobatic
> Championships, piloted by Tex Rankin. The next model was the STA
> Special, powered by a supercharged 150-horsepower (112-kilowatt) 
> engine.This led directly to the STM (Sport Trainer Military) that 
> had the same
> engine but a slightly wider cockpit opening to accommodate the wearing
> of parachutes. 
> 
> The STM was initially marketed in Latin American. Small numbers of
> single-seat versions were sold to Bolivia, Ecuador, Guatemala, 
> Honduras,Mexico, and Nicaragua. The biggest export customer turned 
> out to be the
> Netherlands East Indies (later Indonesia), which needed a basic 
> trainerwhen war broke out in Europe in 1939 and its pilots could 
> not reach the
> Netherlands for training. In 1940, an order was placed for 84 STM-2
> landplane and 24 STM-S2 floatplane trainers that were used as primary,
> basic, and advanced trainers and for every task except bombing and
> gunnery training. Following the invasion of Java by the Japanese,
> several STMs were captured and flown by the invading forces. 
> However, 34
> managed to be evacuated by ship to Australia where the Royal 
> AustralianAir Force put them into service.
> 
> Meanwhile, in 1939, the U.S. Army Air Corps acquired an STA for
> evaluation under the designation XPT-16. A contract for 15 YPT-16s 
> (thelimited version of the XPT) followed. Production for the Air 
> Corps was
> initiated in 1940 with 30 PT-20 trainers, which were similar to the
> YPT-16. The next year, Ryan developed a version with an engine that
> would provide better performance. One hundred PT-21s with a
> 132-horsepower (98 kilowatt) engine were ordered. Additional trainers
> were ordered, and with the rapid expansion of training during 
> 1941, Ryan
> received a contract for 1,023 PT-22 Recruits, which were similar 
> to the
> earlier model. He also developed the civil S-C cabin version. 
> 
> Also notable was the experimental YO-51 Dragonfly observation craft,
> which pioneered short takeoff and landing (STOL) techniques. Ryan
> delivered three YO-51 test models in 1940, but no production order
> followed. 
> 
> Ryan's school also trained thousands of Army pilots during the 
> war, very
> likely becoming the largest contract flying school in the country 
> duringthe war.
> 
> Ryan received a Navy contract in December 1943, to develop the XFR-1
> compound fighter, with a piston engine mounted conventionally in the
> nose and a turbojet engine in the rear fuselage and exhausting through
> the tail. This was followed with an order for 100 FR-1 aircraft, later
> named Fireball. The first XFR-1 flew on June 25, 1944 without the
> turbojet, and the first flight with both engines took place in July.
> Deliveries of Fireballs to the Navy began in March 1945, and by that
> time Ryan had received contracts for a total of 1,300 production
> aircraft. But cancellations at the end of the war reduced its numbers
> and none served in the war. They were used extensively for tests 
> aboardaircraft carriers before being phased out in 1947.
> 
> In the postwar slump, to stay in the business, the company produced
> burial coffins for a time. It then turned out Navion planes until the
> Korean War, a small plane for the personal-business market and for
> military customers, acquired from the aircraft company North American
> Aviation. While out of aircraft production, Ryan gained important
> experimental aircraft contracts and was one of the early leaders 
> in the
> emerging missile and unpiloted-aircraft fields, along with Douglas,
> Martin, and Bell companies. Ryan developed the Firebee target 
> drone and
> the Firebird, the first true air-to-air guided missile. His 
> company also
> pioneered Doppler systems and lunar landing radar.
> 
> There was strong interest in vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL)
> high-performance combat aircraft. The Air Force sponsored the Ryan 
> X-13
> Vertijet, which made its first conventional flight on December 28, 
> 1956.It achieved vertical takeoff to horizontal flight to vertical 
> landing on
> April 11, 1957, but remained strictly experimental. The Vertijet, 
> alongwith the VZ-3RY, and the SV-5A Vertifan convertiplanes all 
> advanced the
> field. 
> 
> In 1955, the Emtor Holding Company, a California investment firm,
> acquired 20 percent of Ryan. The company originally had gone 
> public in
> the late 1930s, and Claude Ryan held only 12 percent of the stock by
> 1955, so Emtor gained effective control. Robert Johnson of Emtor 
> joinedRyan's board and became president in 1961, with Claude Ryan 
> continuingas chairman. Ryan acquired a 50-percent interest in 
> Continental Motors
> Corporation of Detroit, the aircraft engine producer, in 1965.
> 
> Ryan was acquired by Teledyne, Inc., for $128 million in 1968 and 
> becamea wholly owned subsidiary of Teledyne in February 1969. 
> Claude Ryan
> retired but afterward pursued independent experimental work in 
> aircraftfor several years.
> 
> Claude Ryan died in 1982 at the age of 84.
> 
> -Judy Rumerman
> 
> References and Further Reading:
> 
> Donald, David, gen. ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft.
> New York; Barnes & Noble Books, 1997.
> 
> Pattillo, Donald. Pushing the Envelope. Ann Arbor, Mich.: The 
> Universityof Michigan Press, 1998.
> 
> Wagner, William. Ryan, the Aviator - Being the Adventures & 
> Ventures of
> Pioneer Airman & Businessman T. Claude Ryan. New York: McGraw-Hill 
> BookCompany, 1971.
> 
> "Claude Ryan." San Diego Historical Society.
> http://www.sandiegohistory.org/bio/ryan/ryan.htm
> 
> 
> "Ryan STM-S2." New Zealand Warbirds Association.
> http://www.nzwarbirds.org.nz/ryana.html
> 
> 
> Tekulsky, Joseph D. "Peoples and Planes: B.F. Mahoney."
> http://www.thehistorynet.com/AviationHistory/articles/03964_text.htm
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 12:33:57 -0500
> From: "Allen Thomson" <thomsona at flash.net>
> Subject: Re: [FPSPACE] Military Role in Space Control: A Primer
> To: "fpspace" <fpspace at friends-partners.org>
> Message-ID: <00d901c4a8a5$ff8e42c0$230110ac at HOMEBECQ7509O8>
> Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
> 	reply-type=response
> 
> 
> >> MILITARY ROLE IN SPACE CONTROL (CRS)
> 
> > See also the recent "Counterspace Operations", 
> > http://www.dtic.mil/doctrine/jel/service_pubs/afdd2_2_1.pdf
> 
> 
> And  http://www.cdi.org/PDFs/FY05Appropriations.pdf
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 14:14:22 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
> From: DwayneDay <zirconic1 at earthlink.net>
> Subject: Re: [FPSPACE] RE: X-Prize -- Lindburgh's aircraft was never
> 	scaled	up	to become a passenger airliner.
> To: fpspace at friends-partners.org
> Message-ID:
> 	<18093116.1096740862664.JavaMail.root at beaker.psp.pas.earthlink.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Spellman James Civ 60MDG/PA <James.Spellman at travis.af.mil>
> Sent: Oct 2, 2004 1:09 PM
> 
> 
> This might help. . .
> ~JS~
> 
> Ryan Aeronautical Company
> 
> ********
> 
> You didn't cite the URL.  The essay is from the Centennial of 
> Flight website:
> 
> www.centennialofflight.gov
> 
> Myself, Dr. Siddiqi, former Space Online editor Roger Guillemette, 
> and a lot of other people worked on that website a few years ago.  
> I am not fond of the website layout, but the essays there are 
> great sources of info on various aviation and space subjects.  It 
> is worth looking at.
> 
> 
> 
> DDAY
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Sat, 2 Oct 2004 21:46:43 -0700
> From: "Marc D. Rayman" <marc.d.rayman at jpl.nasa.gov>
> Subject: Re: [FPSPACE] Fate of Genesis bus
> To: FPSpace <fpspace at friends-partners.org>
> Message-ID: <p05200f09bd852a1f7652@[137.79.164.148]>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" ; format="flowed"
> 
> At 9:14 PM +0200 9/30/04, Paolo Ulivi wrote:
> >Hi all,
> >according to the Genesis launch press kit, the spacecraft bus was 
> to 
> >be ditched in the Pacific Ocean after releasing the capsule. 
> >However, I have seen studies indicating that it could be diverted 
> >and its scientific instruments (two particle monitors) re-used in 
> an 
> >extended mission either at L1, or switching between L1 and L2 or 
> in 
> >heliocentric orbit.
> >The Genesis landing press kit does not mention the ditching, an 
> >article in AWST hints that the bus was to be diverted and I find 
> >that it is still listed in the JPL's Ephemeris Generator. Does 
> >anybody know what was its fate?
> >Paolo
> 
> As I've seen no response to your question, I'll come out of 
> lurkspace 
> momentarily.
> 
> Genesis was diverted past Earth following the release of the 
> Sample 
> Return Capsule (SRC), and it is in a very high eccentricity orbit, 
> with an apogee around 1 million km.  The maneuver was designed to 
> accommodate two options: 1) safely dispose of the bus in space if 
> the 
> SRC separation were successful, or 2) enable a second entry 
> attempt 
> in March 2005 if the SRC separation were aborted or unsuccessful.
> 
> I don't work on Genesis, but the last I heard, the plan was simply 
> to 
> allow the Sun to pump up the bus' orbital energy, ultimately 
> causing 
> it to escape into a heliocentric Earth-trailing orbit.  Because 
> the 
> spacecraft has more delta-v capability now than when it was 
> launched 
> (the reduction in mass by releasing the SRC more than compensates 
> for 
> the propellant expended during the mission), alternatives were 
> being 
> considered that might involve other substantial changes to its orbit.
> 
> As I understand it, possible uses for the spacecraft include solar 
> wind science (as you point out) and astrodynamics tests.
> 
> Back to lurking...
> 
> Marc Rayman
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Sun, 3 Oct 2004 11:34:06 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
> From: DwayneDay <zirconic1 at earthlink.net>
> Subject: [FPSPACE] China at the IAF Congress
> To: FPSpace <fpspace at friends-partners.org>
> Message-ID:
> 	<30330291.1096817646418.JavaMail.root at thecount.psp.pas.earthlink.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
> 
> In fall 2002 China was set to make a more public appearance at the 
> World Space Congress in Houston.  They had a number of speakers, 
> including one on the Shenzhou heat shield and another on an SZ 
> experiment.  Unfortunately, the US State Department did not get 
> them their visas, and a majority of the Chinese space papers were 
> not presented.
> 
> I looked through the list of papers for the IAF Congress in 
> Vancouver (officially starting Monday) and noticed that a number 
> of the papers that had to cancel back in 2002 are back now, 
> including the two I mentioned.  However, it does not seem to me 
> like there is much else that is new or revealing about the Chinese 
> space program.  I assumed that they would have used an event like 
> this as an opportunity to brag about their new human spaceflight 
> program.  Of course, they might have more material at their 
> pavilion, but that remains to be seen.  (In 2002 their pavilion 
> had remarkably little information.)
> 
> 
> 
> DDAY
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
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> End of FPSPACE Digest, Vol 8, Issue 3
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