[Stop-traffic] News: UN Protocol on Trafficking signed

New Message Reply Date view Thread view Subject view Author view Other groups

Subject: [Stop-traffic] News: UN Protocol on Trafficking signed
From: Walsh, Maureen (Maureen.Walsh@mail.house.gov)
Date: Fri Dec 15 2000 - 17:05:44 EST


http://news.excite.com/news/ap/001215/15/anti-mafia-meeting
<http://news.excite.com/news/ap/001215/15/anti-mafia-meeting>

  U.N. Anti-Mob Treaty Signed
 
 
 
                                      Updated 3:50 PM ET December 15, 2000
 
  By FRANCES D'EMILIO, Associated Press Writer
 
  PALERMO, Sicily (AP) - More than 120 countries had signed a U.N. treaty
  featuring sweeping measures to lift financial secrecy and confiscate
mobsters' wealth
  by Friday's close of an international conference on organized crime,
organizers said.
 
  Among those signing were Switzerland, Monaco, Seychelles, Cyprus and
  Liechtenstein, whose bank secrecy practices have often frustrated
investigators
  following the trail of laundered mob profits.
 
  Wrapping up a four-day United Nations conference in Palermo, a front line
in Italy's
  battle against organized crime, the U.N.'s anti-crime czar, Pino Arlacchi,
said the
  gathering's success exceeded expectations.
 
  "In the fight against the Mafia, we have created a common language and the
same
  legal tools around the world," Arlacchi said.
 
  Sending delegates to Palermo were 148 countries. By Friday afternoon, 121
nations
  signed the treaty, which had been approved last month in New York by the
U.N.
  General Assembly.
 
  Arlacchi said he expected national legislatures to swiftly ratify the
treaty.
 
  Treaty-signers agreed to let investigators examine banking records in
cases of
  suspected crimes. They also agreed to outlaw bank accounts opened
anonymously or
  under false names, and must make it a crime to obstruct justice.
 
  Italy's success in making Mafia association a crime, leading to the
jailing of thousands
  of mobsters in the last two decades, inspired a similar measure in the
treaty to make
  criminal association against the law in other nations.
 
  Since gangs increasingly operate across borders, global recognition of
association as
  a crime could ease extradition, experts said.
 
  Treaty-signers also pledged to make corruption a crime and protect
witnesses who
  testify against mobsters.
 
  Two protocols accompanying the treaty had more limited backing in Palermo.
Eighty
  nations signed a protocol to combat trafficking in prostitutes and child
labor, while 79
  by mid-Friday had signed the second protocol on smuggling of immigrants.
 
  Among the countries not signing those accords were China and Morocco - who
have
  seen their people emigrate in large numbers, often illegally.
 
  The protocols make trafficking in human beings a crime and guarantee that
those
  being smuggled or traded in prostitution rings cannot be prosecuted.
 
  Earlier this year, U.N. negotiators tried unsuccessfully to nail down a
third protocol to
  battle manufacturers and dealers of illegal arms.
 
  Among those pushing for renewed efforts to crack down on firearms was U.S.
  undersecretary of state for global affairs, Frank Loy. The United States
signed the
  treaty and the two protocols on Wednesday.
 
  Arlacchi said negotiations on firearms should start next year.

http://news.excite.com/news/ap/001215/15/anti-mafia-meeting

  U.N. Anti-Mob Treaty Signed
 
 
 
                                      Updated 3:50 PM ET December 15, 2000
 
  By FRANCES D'EMILIO, Associated Press Writer
 
  PALERMO, Sicily (AP) - More than 120 countries had signed a U.N. treaty
  featuring sweeping measures to lift financial secrecy and confiscate mobsters' wealth
  by Friday's close of an international conference on organized crime, organizers said.
 
  Among those signing were Switzerland, Monaco, Seychelles, Cyprus and
  Liechtenstein, whose bank secrecy practices have often frustrated investigators
  following the trail of laundered mob profits.
 
  Wrapping up a four-day United Nations conference in Palermo, a front line in Italy's
  battle against organized crime, the U.N.'s anti-crime czar, Pino Arlacchi, said the
  gathering's success exceeded expectations.
 
  "In the fight against the Mafia, we have created a common language and the same
  legal tools around the world," Arlacchi said.
 
  Sending delegates to Palermo were 148 countries. By Friday afternoon, 121 nations
  signed the treaty, which had been approved last month in New York by the U.N.
  General Assembly.
 
  Arlacchi said he expected national legislatures to swiftly ratify the treaty.
 
  Treaty-signers agreed to let investigators examine banking records in cases of
  suspected crimes. They also agreed to outlaw bank accounts opened anonymously or
  under false names, and must make it a crime to obstruct justice.
 
  Italy's success in making Mafia association a crime, leading to the jailing of thousands
  of mobsters in the last two decades, inspired a similar measure in the treaty to make
  criminal association against the law in other nations.
 
  Since gangs increasingly operate across borders, global recognition of association as
  a crime could ease extradition, experts said.
 
  Treaty-signers also pledged to make corruption a crime and protect witnesses who
  testify against mobsters.
 
  Two protocols accompanying the treaty had more limited backing in Palermo. Eighty
  nations signed a protocol to combat trafficking in prostitutes and child labor, while 79
  by mid-Friday had signed the second protocol on smuggling of immigrants.
 
  Among the countries not signing those accords were China and Morocco - who have
  seen their people emigrate in large numbers, often illegally.
 
  The protocols make trafficking in human beings a crime and guarantee that those
  being smuggled or traded in prostitution rings cannot be prosecuted.
 
  Earlier this year, U.N. negotiators tried unsuccessfully to nail down a third protocol to
  battle manufacturers and dealers of illegal arms.
 
  Among those pushing for renewed efforts to crack down on firearms was U.S.
  undersecretary of state for global affairs, Frank Loy. The United States signed the
  treaty and the two protocols on Wednesday.
 
  Arlacchi said negotiations on firearms should start next year.
_______________________________________________ Stop-traffic mailing list Stop-traffic@friends-partners.org http://fpmail.friends-partners.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/stop-traffic


New Message Reply Date view Thread view Subject view Author view Other groups

This archive was generated by hypermail 2a22 : Mon Dec 18 2000 - 10:55:18 EST