[Stop-traffic] News/US: Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 signed into l aw

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Subject: [Stop-traffic] News/US: Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 signed into l aw
From: Walsh, Maureen (Maureen.Walsh@mail.house.gov)
Date: Thu Nov 02 2000 - 11:14:46 EST


                               Clinton Signs Bill Protecting Women
 
                               Saturday, October 28, 2000
 
                               By Adam Entous
 
                               WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Stating that every 12
seconds a woman
                               in the United States is beaten, President
Clinton signed legislation
                               into law on Saturday to combat domestic abuse
and crack down
                               on global traffickers who force women into
the sex trade.
 
                               Clinton said the new law was the "most
significant step we've ever
                               taken to secure the health and safety of
women at home and
                               around the world."
 
                               New Jersey Republican Rep. Chris Smith, who
sponsored the bill,
                               said it was tantamount to declaring "war on
those who prey on
                               women."
 
                               Approved overwhelmingly by the House of
Representatives and the
                               Senate earlier this month, the legislation
reauthorizes the 1994
                               Violence Against Women Act and provides $3.3
billion over five
                               years to expand shelters for battered women
and children and to
                               prosecute wife beaters.
 
                               The Clinton administration, eager to shore up
support from women
                               for Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore,
made renewal of the
                               law a priority.
 
                               "Domestic violence is a criminal activity. It
devastates its victims
                               and affects us all," Clinton said in his
weekly radio address 10 days
                               before the Nov. 7 election. "It destroys
families, relationships and
                               lives, and it tears at the fabric of who we
are as a people."
 
                               Domestic violence is the No. 1 health risk
for women between the
                               ages of 15 and 44, with an estimated 900,000
U.S. victims a year.
 
                               The legislation will also provide $95 million
to crack down on sex
                               trafficking, which is fast becoming a top
source of income for
                               organized crime.
 
                               It provides for punishment of up to life
imprisonment for
                               traffickers, makes assistance available for
victims who wish to sue
                               their captors, provides shelter and
authorizes changes in
                               immigration laws to allow relief from rapid
deportation so human
                               smuggling cases can be prosecuted.
 
                               Sex trafficking is believed to involve over 1
million women and
                               young girls worldwide, an estimated 50,000 of
whom are forced
                               into prostitution or other forms of slave
labor in the United States
                               alone.
 
                               "Let those who rape, batter, exploit, and
abuse women and girls
                               be put on notice -- we're coming after you to
put you in jail,"
                               Smith said.
 
                               The broad legislation also contains a
provision to make it easier for
                               former hostages and other victims of terror
to collect
                               compensation from nations that sponsor such
acts.
 
                               Specifically, the bill authorizes the
president to take possession of
                               Cuban assets located in the United States in
order to pay
                               court-awarded damages to victims and their
families. In the case
                               of Iran, it authorizes direct payments to
victims.
 
 
 
 
                                Clinton Signs Law Against Violence
 
                               Saturday, October 28, 2000
 

                               By DEB RIECHMANN
                               Associated Press Writer
                                 WASHINGTON (AP) - President Clinton, noting
that a woman is
                               beaten in America every 12 seconds, signed
legislation reinforcing
                               the Violence Against Women Act by covering
women abused by their
                               boyfriends, helping battered immigrant women
and attacking
                               international traffic in human beings.
                                 The new law, he said in his weekly radio
address on Saturday, is
                               ``the most significant step we've ever taken
to secure the health
                               and safety of women at home and around the
world.''
                                 Domestic violence is the No. 1 health risk
for women between the
                               ages of 15 and 44, Clinton said. Almost
one-third of women killed
                               in the United States are victims of husbands,
ex-husbands or
                               boyfriends.
                                 ``Every 12 seconds, another woman is
beaten,'' he said. ``That's
                               nearly 900,000 victims every year.''
                                 Presenting the Victims of Trafficking and
Violence Protection
                               Act as an example of congressional
bipartisanship in action,
                               Clinton also urged Congress to complete its
work on the federal
                               budget.
                                 ``It's time for Congress to set
partisanship aside on the last
                               two unfinished bills, and complete a budget
with smaller class
                               sizes, modern classrooms, family tax cuts and
a higher minimum
                               wage,'' Clinton said, itemizing his budget
priorities.
                                 The anti-violence bill Clinton signed also
contains a provision
                               to help stop what the president called the
``insidious global
                               practice'' of trafficking in human beings.
                                 ``Every year, 1 million or more women,
children and men are
                               forced or tricked into lives of utter misery
- into prostitution,
                               sweatshop work, domestic or farm labor or
debt bondage,'' he said.
                               ``This is slavery, plain and simple.''
                                 It's not just a problem in foreign
countries, he said. ``Each
                               year, as many as 50,000 people are brought to
the United States for
                               this cruel purpose,'' he said.
                                 The legislation sets harsh penalties for
those who trade in
                               human beings. It requires convicted
traffickers to forfeit assets
                               and make restitution to those they have
exploited. And it gives
                               victims better access to shelters, counseling
and medical care.
                                 It also increases U.S. assistance to other
countries to help
                               them track down and punish offenders and
provides sanctions for
                               nations that refuse to act against the
practice.
                                 The law reauthorizes and strengthens the
Violence Against Women
                               Act, passed in 1994.
                                 The new law continues providing money for
grant programs to help
                               police investigate violence against women and
provide victims'
                               services. It expands the investigation and
prosecution of crimes of
                               violence against women and continues to fund
the National Domestic
                               Violence hot line. It also provides new
protections for mistreated
                               immigrants; expands assistance to programs
targeting dating
                               violence; and gives more money to American
Indians who are victims
                               of domestic violence.
                                 ``Domestic violence is a criminal
activity,'' Clinton said. ``It
                               devastates its victims and affects us all. It
increases health
                               costs, keeps people from showing up to work,
prevents them from
                               performing at their best.''
                                 ---

                               Clinton Signs Bill Protecting Women
 
                               Saturday, October 28, 2000
 
                               By Adam Entous
 
                               WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Stating that every 12 seconds a woman
                               in the United States is beaten, President Clinton signed legislation
                               into law on Saturday to combat domestic abuse and crack down
                               on global traffickers who force women into the sex trade.
 
                               Clinton said the new law was the "most significant step we've ever
                               taken to secure the health and safety of women at home and
                               around the world."
 
                               New Jersey Republican Rep. Chris Smith, who sponsored the bill,
                               said it was tantamount to declaring "war on those who prey on
                               women."
 
                               Approved overwhelmingly by the House of Representatives and the
                               Senate earlier this month, the legislation reauthorizes the 1994
                               Violence Against Women Act and provides $3.3 billion over five
                               years to expand shelters for battered women and children and to
                               prosecute wife beaters.
 
                               The Clinton administration, eager to shore up support from women
                               for Democratic presidential nominee Al Gore, made renewal of the
                               law a priority.
 
                               "Domestic violence is a criminal activity. It devastates its victims
                               and affects us all," Clinton said in his weekly radio address 10 days
                               before the Nov. 7 election. "It destroys families, relationships and
                               lives, and it tears at the fabric of who we are as a people."
 
                               Domestic violence is the No. 1 health risk for women between the
                               ages of 15 and 44, with an estimated 900,000 U.S. victims a year.
 
                               The legislation will also provide $95 million to crack down on sex
                               trafficking, which is fast becoming a top source of income for
                               organized crime.
 
                               It provides for punishment of up to life imprisonment for
                               traffickers, makes assistance available for victims who wish to sue
                               their captors, provides shelter and authorizes changes in
                               immigration laws to allow relief from rapid deportation so human
                               smuggling cases can be prosecuted.
 
                               Sex trafficking is believed to involve over 1 million women and
                               young girls worldwide, an estimated 50,000 of whom are forced
                               into prostitution or other forms of slave labor in the United States
                               alone.
 
                               "Let those who rape, batter, exploit, and abuse women and girls
                               be put on notice -- we're coming after you to put you in jail,"
                               Smith said.
 
                               The broad legislation also contains a provision to make it easier for
                               former hostages and other victims of terror to collect
                               compensation from nations that sponsor such acts.
 
                               Specifically, the bill authorizes the president to take possession of
                               Cuban assets located in the United States in order to pay
                               court-awarded damages to victims and their families. In the case
                               of Iran, it authorizes direct payments to victims.
 
 
 
 
                                Clinton Signs Law Against Violence
 
                               Saturday, October 28, 2000
 

                               By DEB RIECHMANN
                               Associated Press Writer
                                 WASHINGTON (AP) - President Clinton, noting that a woman is
                               beaten in America every 12 seconds, signed legislation reinforcing
                               the Violence Against Women Act by covering women abused by their
                               boyfriends, helping battered immigrant women and attacking
                               international traffic in human beings.
                                 The new law, he said in his weekly radio address on Saturday, is
                               ``the most significant step we've ever taken to secure the health
                               and safety of women at home and around the world.''
                                 Domestic violence is the No. 1 health risk for women between the
                               ages of 15 and 44, Clinton said. Almost one-third of women killed
                               in the United States are victims of husbands, ex-husbands or
                               boyfriends.
                                 ``Every 12 seconds, another woman is beaten,'' he said. ``That's
                               nearly 900,000 victims every year.''
                                 Presenting the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection
                               Act as an example of congressional bipartisanship in action,
                               Clinton also urged Congress to complete its work on the federal
                               budget.
                                 ``It's time for Congress to set partisanship aside on the last
                               two unfinished bills, and complete a budget with smaller class
                               sizes, modern classrooms, family tax cuts and a higher minimum
                               wage,'' Clinton said, itemizing his budget priorities.
                                 The anti-violence bill Clinton signed also contains a provision
                               to help stop what the president called the ``insidious global
                               practice'' of trafficking in human beings.
                                 ``Every year, 1 million or more women, children and men are
                               forced or tricked into lives of utter misery - into prostitution,
                               sweatshop work, domestic or farm labor or debt bondage,'' he said.
                               ``This is slavery, plain and simple.''
                                 It's not just a problem in foreign countries, he said. ``Each
                               year, as many as 50,000 people are brought to the United States for
                               this cruel purpose,'' he said.
                                 The legislation sets harsh penalties for those who trade in
                               human beings. It requires convicted traffickers to forfeit assets
                               and make restitution to those they have exploited. And it gives
                               victims better access to shelters, counseling and medical care.
                                 It also increases U.S. assistance to other countries to help
                               them track down and punish offenders and provides sanctions for
                               nations that refuse to act against the practice.
                                 The law reauthorizes and strengthens the Violence Against Women
                               Act, passed in 1994.
                                 The new law continues providing money for grant programs to help
                               police investigate violence against women and provide victims'
                               services. It expands the investigation and prosecution of crimes of
                               violence against women and continues to fund the National Domestic
                               Violence hot line. It also provides new protections for mistreated
                               immigrants; expands assistance to programs targeting dating
                               violence; and gives more money to American Indians who are victims
                               of domestic violence.
                                 ``Domestic violence is a criminal activity,'' Clinton said. ``It
                               devastates its victims and affects us all. It increases health
                               costs, keeps people from showing up to work, prevents them from
                               performing at their best.''
                                 ---
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