Dutch to bar non-European prostitutes

New Message Reply Date view Thread view Subject view Author view Other groups

Subject: Dutch to bar non-European prostitutes
From: Kinsey Dinan (dinank@hrw.org)
Date: Mon Dec 27 1999 - 20:00:13 EST


--Boundary_(ID_Il3R3zMUsFSQyRVjY/x3tQ)
Content-type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

International: Dutch to bar non-European prostitutes
 JUSTIN L'ANSON SPARKS in Amsterdam

 12/26/1999
 The Sunday Telegraph (United Kingdom)
 Copyright (C) 1999 The Sunday Telegraph; Source: World Reporter
 (TM)

 ONE of the world's most infamous red-light districts looks set to
shrink as
 the Dutch government moves to regulate the country's sex industry.

 The number of prostitutes operating in Amsterdam could fall from 25,000

 to 10,000, say industry watchers, under new legislation taking effect
next
 summer. Many brothels will be forced out of business as the price of
vice
 rises sharply.

 The law, which will outlaw sex workers from non-European Union
 countries, is part of plans to legalise prostitution and regulate
brothels.

 "Foreign girls working in the Netherlands have been tolerated up to
now,"
 said Karin Vissenburg, of the De Graaf Institute for Issues of
Prostitution
 . "But with the new law they will be forced to move either to other EU
 countries or to operate illegally."

 She added: "Girls from the poorest countries in the EU, such as Spain
and
 Portugal, will most likely move in to fill the vacuum."

 Women from African and Asian countries are prepared to work for as
 little as pounds 10 per customer because of favourable exchange rates
 when sending money home. But EU prostitutes are expected to demand
 far higher prices.

 Andr van Dorst, of the Dutch Association of Brothel Owners, said the
sex
 trade would inevitably shrink as prices rose. "I don't believe that
inflation
 will be rampant in the long term," he said, "but it will rise sharply
in the
 beginning, going up by at least 25 per cent."

 There are concerns that higher prices in Amsterdam will lose the city
trade
 to neighbouring countries where foreign prostitutes are still
tolerated.
 Some people expect more than a third of the country's 3,000 registered
 brothels to close.

 Mr van Dorst pointed out that the new government regulations also posed

 a big problem for smaller brothels. "New fire escapes, more lavatories,

 sinks, showers and new tax contributions for employees - these are what

 will drive many to bankruptcy," he said.

 However, the forecast price rise has been welcomed by the prostitutes'
 own union, which complains that Amsterdam has the cheapest prices in
 much of Europe.

 "There's too much competition," complained Anouk, a Dutch prostitute
 who works in one of Amsterdam's red-light window booths. "Hopefully,
 fewer of us will lead to greater price stability and a yearly increase
like in
 any other job, such as hairdressing or banking."

 Tineke Bekker, of the Foundation against Women Trafficking, is less
 optimistic. She fears that foreign women will be forced to work
illegally in
 worse conditions with little access to health care and support groups.

--
Kinsey Alden Dinan
Women's Rights Division/Asia Division
Human Rights Watch
350 Fifth Avenue, 34th Floor
New York, NY 10118-3299
Tel: (212) 216-1858
Fax: (212) 736-1300
E-mail: dinank@hrw.org

--Boundary_(ID_Il3R3zMUsFSQyRVjY/x3tQ) Content-type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en"> International: Dutch to bar non-European prostitutes
 JUSTIN L'ANSON SPARKS in Amsterdam

 12/26/1999
 The Sunday Telegraph (United Kingdom)
 Copyright (C) 1999 The Sunday Telegraph; Source: World Reporter
 (TM)

 ONE of the world's most infamous red-light districts looks set to
shrink as
 the Dutch government moves to regulate the country's sex industry.

 The number of prostitutes operating in Amsterdam could fall from 25,000

 to 10,000, say industry watchers, under new legislation taking effect
next
 summer. Many brothels will be forced out of business as the price of
vice
 rises sharply.

 The law, which will outlaw sex workers from non-European Union
 countries, is part of plans to legalise prostitution and regulate
brothels.

 "Foreign girls working in the Netherlands have been tolerated up to
now,"
 said Karin Vissenburg, of the De Graaf Institute for Issues of
Prostitution
 . "But with the new law they will be forced to move either to other EU
 countries or to operate illegally."

 She added: "Girls from the poorest countries in the EU, such as Spain
and
 Portugal, will most likely move in to fill the vacuum."

 Women from African and Asian countries are prepared to work for as
 little as pounds 10 per customer because of favourable exchange rates
 when sending money home. But EU prostitutes are expected to demand
 far higher prices.

 Andr van Dorst, of the Dutch Association of Brothel Owners, said the
sex
 trade would inevitably shrink as prices rose. "I don't believe that
inflation
 will be rampant in the long term," he said, "but it will rise sharply
in the
 beginning, going up by at least 25 per cent."

 There are concerns that higher prices in Amsterdam will lose the city
trade
 to neighbouring countries where foreign prostitutes are still
tolerated.
 Some people expect more than a third of the country's 3,000 registered
 brothels to close.

 Mr van Dorst pointed out that the new government regulations also posed

 a big problem for smaller brothels. "New fire escapes, more lavatories,

 sinks, showers and new tax contributions for employees - these are what

 will drive many to bankruptcy," he said.

 However, the forecast price rise has been welcomed by the prostitutes'
 own union, which complains that Amsterdam has the cheapest prices in
 much of Europe.

 "There's too much competition," complained Anouk, a Dutch prostitute
 who works in one of Amsterdam's red-light window booths. "Hopefully,
 fewer of us will lead to greater price stability and a yearly increase
like in
 any other job, such as hairdressing or banking."

 Tineke Bekker, of the Foundation against Women Trafficking, is less
 optimistic. She fears that foreign women will be forced to work
illegally in
 worse conditions with little access to health care and support groups.
 
 
 

--
Kinsey Alden Dinan
Women's Rights Division/Asia Division
Human Rights Watch
350 Fifth Avenue, 34th Floor
New York, NY 10118-3299
Tel: (212) 216-1858
Fax: (212) 736-1300
E-mail: dinank@hrw.org
  --Boundary_(ID_Il3R3zMUsFSQyRVjY/x3tQ)--


New Message Reply Date view Thread view Subject view Author view Other groups

This archive was generated by hypermail 2a22 : Mon Dec 27 1999 - 20:00:45 EST