Re: News/SWITZERLAND: CHRISTIAN GROUP BUYS FREEDOM OF 5,514 SUDAN

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Subject: Re: News/SWITZERLAND: CHRISTIAN GROUP BUYS FREEDOM OF 5,514 SUDAN
From: Janice Price (janice@seanet.com)
Date: Fri Dec 24 1999 - 12:06:02 EST


I would be more bothered by it if ransom were the only reason--or the
largest reason--people we being abducted. Since it's not, I think the
overall sum of people left free is larger when ransoms are paid than when
not. Just conjecture on my part, though.
j.
Janice Price
Seattle, WA
email: janice@seanet.com

> From: Melanie Orhant <morhant@igc.org>
> To: Multiple recipients of list <stop-traffic@SOLAR.RTD.UTK.EDU>
> Subject: News/SWITZERLAND: CHRISTIAN GROUP BUYS FREEDOM OF 5,514 SUDAN
> Date: Wednesday, December 22, 1999 10:55 AM
>
> So what do y'all think about this? I, for one, am totally bothered by
> it.....this plan just seems to cause more people to kidnap and sell
people.
> There is a very good article that critiques this whole thing is in the
> Atlantic Monthly. I can go & look up the issue number if any of you are
> interested.
>
> Melanie....
>
> __________________________
>
> 12-22-99 SWITZERLAND: CHRISTIAN GROUP BUYS FREEDOM OF 5,514 SUDAN SLAVES.
> GENEVA, Dec 22 (Reuters) - A controversial Swiss-based Christian human
> rights group said on Wednesday it had bought the freedom of 5,514 more
> black African slaves in Sudan during a secret mission last week.
> In a statement, Christian Solidarity International (CSI) said the latest
> redemption of mainly women and children brought to 20,961 the number of
> slaves freed through its programme since 1995.
> "The slaves, mainly Christian and animist women and children from the
Dinka
> tribe, were brought out of captivity in northern Sudan and returned to
> their homeland in the south by eight networks of Arab retrievers," the
> Zurich-based group said.
> CSI accuses the armed forces of Sudan's National Islamic Front, mainly
its
> Popular Defence Force, of capturing Christians and animists in raids
which
> it says are part of the regime's jihad, or Islamic holy war, against
> minorities who resist its policies of "forced Islamisation and
> Arabisation".
> CSI has come under fire for allegedly fuelling the slave trade. The head
of
> the United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, Carol
Bellamy,
> has said the practice "encouraged more trafficking and criminality".
> In October, a key U.N. body, the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC),
> withdrew CSI's accreditation because it had allowed Sudan rebel leader
John
> Garang to address the human rights forum last March during speaking time
> allotted to it as a non-governmental organisation.
> The CSI statement said more than 100,000 people remain in bondage in
> northern Sudan as slaves or are "subjected to slave-like practices in
(the)
> Sudanese government's concentration camps - often euphemistically called
> 'peace camps' for the displaced".
> CSI said it had paid Arab middlemen a fixed fee of 50,000 Sudanese pounds
> per slave in its latest operation. "This amount currently has the local
> value of two goats, or $50," CSI said.
> "During the raids, villages are torched, men are shot dead, the elderly
are
> beaten and abused, and women, children, cows, goats and food stores are
> captured as war booty," the group said.
> "The women and child slaves are forced to walk for days to the North. On
> the way, beatings, public executions and gang rape are commonplace.
> "In the North, the slaves are divided among their captors. They are
> routinely subjected to forced labour, sexual abuse - including female
> genital excision - forced Islamisation, beatings, death threats and
racist
> verbal abuse and a meagre diet," it added.
> The Khartoum government denies slavery exists as such but says it is
trying
> to stamp out abductions for forced labour.
> (C) Reuters Limited 1999.
> REUTERS NEWS SERVICE
>
> Melanie Orhant
>
> morhant@igc.org
> __________________
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