Conference on prostitution and call for papers

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Subject: Conference on prostitution and call for papers
From: A. Jordan (annj@hrlawgroup.org)
Date: Fri Jul 16 1999 - 16:45:55 EDT


>
>Research Center on Development and International Relations
>Department of Development and Planning
>
>Call for Papers:
>
>INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE:
>
>PROSTITUTION IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT-
>INTERTWINED HISTORIES,
>PRESENT REALITIES
>
>Aalborg University, Denmark, November 16 - 18, 1999
>
>Susanne Thorbek
>Feminist Research Centre, FREIA
>Development and International Relations, DIR
>
>PROSTITUTION IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT
>
>INTERTWINED HISTORIES AND PRESENT REALITIES
>
>The purpose of the conference is to combine knowledge from different
>fields, which are relevant for understanding the social construction of
>prostitution.
>
>This approach to transnational prostitution seems important. Transnational
>prostitution is of growing concern in Europe, in several countries and in
>international organisations, but the confusion and contradictions in
>proposals for new legislation and international treaties, and the maybe
>even greater confusion in implementing institutions points to very mixed
>feelings. Hopefully a joint effort of understanding how our concepts and
>notions, our institutions and policies have been created may help to
>clarify the issues involved in transnational prostitution.
>
>Transnational prostitution has increased in the last 30 years. This is the
>case for customers who travel to foreign countries and enjoy paid sexual
>satisfaction of increasingly varied kinds. This is also the case for women
>(sometimes children and some men) who are sent to or travel abroad to work
>as prostitutes in rich countries.
>
>The economic and political factors behind the increase in transnational
>prostitution is only partly known, but development policies have not been
>able to prevent or have contributed to growing inequality globally,
>regionally and between men and women. Even in countries with economic
>growth, imbalances between rich and poor, countryside and city is in most
>cases increasing.
>
>The cultural changes may be important as well. Individualism, fragmentation
>and "freedom" to pursue one's own happiness, the mass media and their
>stress on consumption, but also on bodies, and sexuality and advertisements
>of these features all contribute to the growth of prostitution as
>adventure, as variety and as a way out of loneliness.
>
>Last, but not least, strong vested interests are behind transnational
>prostitution in the tourist industry, in agreements on rest and recreation
>for military staff placed in foreign countries, in connection with big male
>work-places and sometimes more or less tacit agreements between governments
>and the sex-industry as well as other industries.
>
>The concept of prostitution has been problematised and other concepts
>proposed: Traffic in women, setting focus on those women and children who
>are forced, cheated or deceived into the sex-business, sold and often kept
>under slavery-like conditions. Sex-workers where the acceptance of the
>facts of prostitution is stressed, the magnitude of the sex-sector, the
>vested interests, the impact of the sector on national economies and the
>legitimacy of choosing prostitution as a profession.
>
>However, the purpose of the conference is to analyse the situations in
>which the concept of prostitution were created or given new meaning and the
>inter-relations between the concept of prostitution and other concepts of
>gender relations, of bodies and sexuality, of race and class.
>
>The construction of the "correct" feelings related to sexuality, of decent,
>virtuous female behaviour in opposition to indecent lavish sexuality, was
>an important distinguishing factor in relation to class. The bourgeoisie
>was partly constituted through its sexuality and form of family and the
>fear of the sexuality of maids, domestics and the poor an important
feature.
>
>As some new works show, sexuality, forms of female behaviour and family
>were also important features for the colonising nations, partly responsible
>for creating the distinctions between coloniser and colonised and the
>superiority of the former. Feelings of great importance for the upholding
>of empire at the end of the former century.
>
>Lastly the creation of the western scientific project at the turn of the
>last century created scientific racism with the stereotypes of the "black"
>and other races. Similarly sciences produced concepts of women as
>sexualised beings and both these concepts overlapped those of class, of the
>lower classes and prostitutes.
>
>The stereotypes of "the others", of women, other races, other classes were
>however projections of both abhorrence and fascination and this may have
>influenced the lasting influence of some of these ideas.
>
>The constructions of gender and sexuality, of prostitution, were developed
>and implemented in the colonies, they were mainly formulated in the
>metropoles by science and politicians, reformers and popular movements,
>literature and art.
>
>These constructions may have looked quite differently from the perspective
>of the colonised people who have both accepted and reacted against notions
>and concepts, which were imposed upon their societies and their history.
>The histories of colonies and metropoles are intertwined and the conference
>will aim at combining research on the construction of prostitution as a
>concept inter-related with other important categories in both the
>metropolises and the colonies or as dependent states.
>
>Men and women today seem to see prostitution as very different notions.
>Love for sale may express a male perspective. Women and prostitutes hardly
>believe they sell either their emotions or their sexual satisfaction. The
>different perceptions, notions and interests of men and women, especially
>those working in prostitution, will be a main theme.
>
>The themes to be presented and debated at the conference will thus be
>
>November 16 Transnational prostitution today
>
>November 17 Constructions of prostitution, gender and sexuality in
>post-colonial,countries
>
>November 18 Constructions of prostitution, sexuality, gender, race and
>class in Western societies
>
>
>PRACTICAL INFORMATION
>
>Deadline for payment of registration fee, DKK 500/$ 100: September 15, 1999
>
>Deadline for abstract of paper to be presented at the conference: September
>15, 1999
>
>Deadline for paper to be presented at the conference November 1, 1999
>
>During the conference, food can be bought at reasonable prices at the
>university (approximately 150 DKK per day)
>
>We can help you to find hotels at different price levels.
>
>Susanne Thorbek
>Dr. Phil. Senior Lecturer
>Aalborg University
>Fibigerstraede 2
>9200 Aalborg ?
>
>
>
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