Congratulations to US Justice Department

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Subject: Congratulations to US Justice Department
From: Jyothi Kanics (jkanics@igc.org)
Date: Tue Apr 20 1999 - 12:58:34 EDT


>From: "trafficking" <trafficking@hrlawgroup.org>
>To: <stop-traffic@solar.cini.utk.edu>
>Subject: congratulations to Justice Department
>
>THANKS to everyone at Justice for the terrific job they did in the Florida
>case. We finally have a case in which the right of women trafficked into
>the sex industry to recover monies for all their work and suffering at the
>hands of the traffickers is recognized. It is only fair and just that the
>profits
>earned by the traffickers from forcing the women to work in abusive and
>dangerous conditions should go to the women. This goes a long way to a
>newer, more humane treatment of trafficked persons in the US. Now, if we
>could only have this codified into law.
>
>Ann Jordan
>Director, Initiative Against Trafficking in Persons
>International Human Rights Law Group
>1200 18th St., NW
>Washington, DC 20036
>P:202-822-4600
>F:202-822-4606
>www.hrlawgroup.org
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Melanie Orhant <morhant@igc.org>
>To: Multiple recipients of list <stop-traffic@solar.cini.utk.edu>
>Date: Friday, April 09, 1999 11:50 AM
>Subject: news: Women smuggled into U.S., forced into prostitution try to
>
>
>>Women smuggled into U.S., forced into prostitution try to recoup $ 1M
>>By STEPHANIE SMITH
>>PALM BEACH DAILY BUSINESS REVIEW, April 8, 1999
>>
>>A week after Rogerio Cadena was ordered to pay $ 1 million in restitution
>>to 17 women he helped smuggle from Mexico and forced to be prostitutes in
>>cities throughout Florida, attorneys involved in the case are trying to
>>figure out how to collect the money on behalf of the victims.
>>
>>The women, some as young as 14, were brought here by the Cadena family
>>thinking they would get jobs as nannies and housekeepers. Instead, they
>>were forced to service men every 15 minutes for 12 hours a day, six days a
>>week. The men were charged $ 20 for each encounter.
>>
>>The women worked in squalid trailers across Florida, including Fort
>>Lauderdale, Fort Myers, West Palm Beach, Lake Worth and Okeechobee, as well
>>as in South Carolina and North Carolina. They were allowed to keep $ 3 from
>>each sexual encounter, out of which they had to pay a fee for being
>>smuggled into the United States and for room and board, said federal
>>prosecutors.
>>
>>The victims' working conditions and hours are what determined the amount of
>>the restitution. The $ 1 million would be the actual amount the women
>>worked under the pay system the Cadenas set up, said Holly Skolnick, an
>>attorney with Miami's Greenberg Traurig who represents 12 of the women. The
>>women are also are represented by attorneys for the Florida Immigrant
>>Advocacy Center.
>>
>>The case, jointly prosecuted by the Justice Department in Washington, D.C.,
>>and the U.S. attorney's office in South Florida, has led to the creation of
>>a Justice Department task force to crack down on the exploitation of
>>illegal immigrants.
>>
>>Depending on the length of a victim's captivity in the Cadena brothels,
>>which serviced migrant farm workers, the women would receive from $ 6,750
>>to $ 198,000 each, should the money ever be collected.
>>
>>But that's a big "if."
>>
>>Abe A. Bailey, the attorney for Cadena, doubted the girls would ever see
>>the money. "It's a fictitious award. They [the Cadena family] don't have
>>anything anyway," he said.
>>
>>Still, Skolnick said, the victims will take the restitution order and seek
>>civil judgment in Mexico. The
>>restitution order is payable jointly by all the defendants, including six
>>who are in federal custody. An
>>additional five suspects are fugitives suspected of fleeing to Mexico.
>>Skolnick adds that restitution would
>>not violate laws against profiting from criminal enterprise, namely
>>prostitution, because the women were
>>unwilling victims instead of active criminal participants.
>>
>>"Mr. Cadena is looking for a sentence reduction down the line," she said,
>>and added that there is hope Cadena will assist in identifying the Cadena
>>family's Mexican assets. In addition to the $ 1 million resitution
>>order, Cadena was also sentenced to 15 years in federal prison.
>>
>>Meanwhile, the victims remain in South Florida, most of them working
>>legitimate jobs, but their immigration status is uncertain.
>>
>>Their attorneys say the unwilling prostitutes are still terrified of
>>reprisals against their families in Mexico
>>and for themselves by the Cadena family.
>>
>>None of the women showed up in court to see Cadena sentenced by U.S.
>>District Judge Kenneth Ryskamp in West Palm Beach, who described Cadena's
>>actions as "so utterly disgusting that it's hard to comprehend."
>>
>>Melanie Orhant
>>
>>Co-Director
>>Human Trafficking Program
>>Global Survival Network
>>
>>P.O. Box 73214
>>Washington, DC 20009
>>T: 387-0028
>>F: 387-2590
>>Email: morhant@igc.org
>>www.globalsurvival.net
>>
>
>
>


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