X-post # 5 from [end-violence] Re: Strategies against trafficking of women

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Subject: X-post # 5 from [end-violence] Re: Strategies against trafficking of women
From: Jyothi Kanics (jkanics@igc.apc.org)
Date: Tue Feb 23 1999 - 18:07:06 EST


>Date: Mon, 22 Feb 1999 06:47:36 -0800 (PST)
>To: end-violence@edc-cit.org
>From: Jyothi Kanics <jkanics@igc.apc.org>
>Subject: [end-violence] Re: Strategies against trafficking of women
>
>Dear Working Group,
>
>I work with the Global Survival Network (GSN), a non-profit organization
>that carries out investigations in order to expose the mechanisms behind
>human trafficking and then uses that information in advocacy campaigns for
>change. Many of you are already familiar with GSN's film "Bought & Sold"
>and report "Crime & Servitude" that document GSN's two-year investigation
>into trafficking of women from the Newly Independent States (NIS) for
>sexual slavery.
>
>GSN is currently working with the Open Society Institute's Network Women's
>Program in the NIS and Central and Eastern Europe to build the capacity of
>NGOs in that region to better address trafficking through work that
>focuses on public awareness activities, advocacy for legislative &
>enforcement policy reform and direct services to trafficked persons.
>
>GSN agrees with the suggestions made by Empower. We would also like to
>stress that the first step in addressing this issue is agreeing on a
>definition (I am attaching the definition GSN supports below). Once the
>problem has been clearly defined, then you can move forward to analyze
>current legislation and see if it addresses all possible scenarios of
>trafficking. In addition to reviewing current legislation and proposing
>new legislation, it is crucial to examine rule of law in your system of
>government --- if you have legislation against trafficking, how will it be
>implemented? who needs to be educated? Education of all government
>officials involved in the detection, documentation, and prosecution of
>trafficking cases is a very important step to addressing the problem. This
>calls for greater cooperation between NGOs and government agencies.
>
>Best wishes,
>
>Jyothi Kanics
>
>jkanics@igc.org
>Global Survival Network
>
>>>>
>
>>From the HUMAN RIGHTS STANDARDS FOR THE TREATMENT
>OF TRAFFICKED PERSONS written by
>Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women
>Foundation Against Trafficking in Women
>International Human Rights Law Group
>
>Trafficking: All acts and attempted acts involved in the recruitment,
>transportation within or across borders, purchase, sale, transfer, receipt
>or harbouring of a person involving the use of deception, coercion
>(including the use or threat of force or the abuse of authority) or debt
>bondage for the purpose of placing or holding such person, whether for pay
>or not, in involuntary servitude (domestic, sexual or reproductive), in
>forced or bonded labour, or in slavery-like conditions, in a community other
>than the one in which such person lived at the time of the original
>deception, coercion or debt bondage.
>
>
>
>
>


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