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Steven Russell Galster (gcrg@igc.apc.org)
Sun, 14 Jun 1998 13:10:04 -0700 (PDT)


>From jkanics@igc.apc.org Fri Jun 12 13:15:48 1998
>From jkanics Fri Jun 12 13:15:48 1998
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Date: Fri, 12 Jun 1998 13:15:41 -0700 (PDT)
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To: gcrg@igc.apc.org
From: Jyothi Kanics---Global Survival Network <jkanics@igc.apc.org>
Subject: here it is
Cc: gbcaldwell@aol.com
Status: RO

Dear List members,

As many of you know, the STOP TRAFFIC Listserv has recently channeled
 numerous stories of state law enforcement agencies "cracking down" on
 trafficking by targeting domestic and migrant sex workers and other
undocumented laborers. This is of obvious concern to many of us who
are encouraging governments to adopt the Global Alliance Against Traffic in
Women (GAATW) definition of trafficking for cases involving women, which
requires some form of abuse orcoersion, and to treat trafficking as a labor
and human rights issue.
    
The Global Survival Network is currently initiating an informal study on on
 how states respond to cases of trafficking. Once we collected sufficient
data,
we would like to create a brief report on this subject in order to influence the
 ongoing debates at the national and international levels about trafficking.
 
 We invite you to submit any examples that you know of (positive or
negative) of how state institutions (especially law enforcement
 agencies) have responded to cases of trafficking for forced prostitution or
 other kinds of forced labor.

 The GAATW definition of trafficking in women is:
"All acts involved in the recruitment or transportation of a woman within
and acrossnational borders, for work or services, by means of violence or
threat of violence,debt bondage, deception or other coercion."
  
 Many governments define trafficking differently or not at all.
 
 If you can submit information, please pass any press reports to us by email
 (gcrg@igc.org) with as much of the following detail as possible:

Date:
Place (City/Country):
Circumstances of the Case:
Response by state
1) Who, if anyone, was arrested?
2) Who, if anyone, was detained (imprisoned or otherwise)?
3) Who, if anyone, was charged and with what crimes or other charges?
4) Who, if anyone, was prosecuted? Was there a conviction or an acquittal?
5) If there was a conviction, what was the sentence?
6) Who, if anyone, was deported? Were they deported voluntarily or not?
 7) Were the [trafficking victims -do you want to call them that?] provided
access to a nongovernmental organization which could provide advice and
assistance? Were the trafficking victims provided access to legal
representation and a translator?
 [Other questions? I think you need to think this out some more so you are
 clear what info you want]
 
 Local Law that was used to justify action:
 Source of information:

We are interested in cases that date back to 1993, but we are
 especially interested in recent cases.
 
 Thank you very much for your assistance. We hope this will be a valuable
 contribution to the debate.

 Sincerely,

Steven Galster
 Executive Director
Global Survival Network
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