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astronautix.com Graphics Index Volume 55

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Gemini Docks with LM Gemini rendezvous above lunar surface with open cockpit Lunar Module after first lunar landing in 1966
Credit: © Mark Wade. File Name: gemlmlun.jpg. Image width: 373 pixels. Image height: 288 pixels. Image size: 36,780 bytes.
Gemini Lunar SRS Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft. This spacecraft would be piloted by two crew to a landing near a stranded Apollo lunar module. The extended Gemini reentry capsule had a passenger compartment for the two rescued astronauts. The LSRS used three Lunar Module descent stages for lunar orbit insertion, lunar landing, and lunar ascent. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemlulsr.jpg. Image width: 538 pixels. Image height: 408 pixels. Image size: 51,464 bytes.
Gemini lunar Gemini-Centaur docked configuration. Launched seperately, the Gemini would have docked with the Centaur stage in low earth orbit. The Centaur would then fire, placing the Gemini on a circumlunar trajectory.
Credit: © Mark Wade. File Name: gemluna.gif. Image width: 774 pixels. Image height: 517 pixels. Image size: 13,775 bytes.
Gemini Lunar SRS Alternate configuration for a Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Vehicle. In place of 3 LM descent stages , this version uses 2 Apollo Service Modules and a repackaged LM descent stage. The first SM completes the translunar injection begun by the S-IVB stage. The second SM brakes into lunar orbit and then acts as a 'lunar crasher' stage, burning out just above the lunar surface. The third stage hovers to a landing near a stranded lunar module, and later boosts the Gemini capsule intotransearth trajectory. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemlunal.jpg. Image width: 546 pixels. Image height: 315 pixels. Image size: 26,593 bytes.
Lunar Orbit Gemini Lunar Orbit Gemini. In this version a Gemini docks with a Titan 3C-launched transtage, which maneuvers the Gemini into a lunar orbit and then returns it to earth.
Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemlunor.jpg. Image width: 469 pixels. Image height: 164 pixels. Image size: 11,822 bytes.
Gemini LORV Gemini Lunar Orbit Rescue Vehicle, studied for rescue of an Apollo crew stranded in lunar orbit. Gemini would be launched by Saturn V. Following lunar orbit insertion it would rendezvous with the disabled Apollo. The three Apollo crew members would transfer by spacewalk to a compartment in the stretched Gemini capsule. It would then boost itself on a transearth trajectory. This was rejected in favor of the more flexible Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Vehicle. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemluorv.jpg. Image width: 407 pixels. Image height: 286 pixels. Image size: 20,861 bytes.
Gemini Lunar SSS Drawing of the Gemini Lunar Surface Survival Shelter. The shelter would be landed, unmanned, near the landing site of a stranded Apollo Lunar Module. In the event the LM ascent stage would not light to take the crew back to the Apollo CSM in lunar orbit, the two astronauts could go to the shelter and await a rescue mission. The astronaut in the CSM would return alone in the Apollo spacecraft. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemlusss.jpg. Image width: 522 pixels. Image height: 395 pixels. Image size: 28,505 bytes.
Gemini Light Suit Gemini Lightweight Suit
Credit: USAF. File Name: gemlwsut.jpg. Image width: 160 pixels. Image height: 332 pixels. Image size: 14,144 bytes.
Gemini with MORL Gemini docked with MORL. Note lack of a docking hatch in Gemini is accomodated by having docking collar as large as the base of the Gemini reentry vehicle itself.
Credit: US Air Force. File Name: gemmorl.jpg. Image width: 517 pixels. Image height: 305 pixels. Image size: 43,064 bytes.
Gemini Observatory Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemobsvy.jpg. Image width: 347 pixels. Image height: 255 pixels. Image size: 9,260 bytes.
GE MOSES General Electric Manned Orbiting Shuttle Escape System proposed for use with the shuttle in the 1970's.
File Name: gemoses.jpg. Image width: 257 pixels. Image height: 308 pixels. Image size: 22,403 bytes.
Gemini Control Panel Control panel of the basic Gemini (903 x 765 pixel image).
Credit: NASA. File Name: gempa100.jpg. Image width: 903 pixels. Image height: 765 pixels. Image size: 146,321 bytes.
Gemini Control Panel Control panel of the basic Gemini (454 x 383 pixel image).
Credit: NASA. File Name: gempan50.jpg. Image width: 454 pixels. Image height: 383 pixels. Image size: 42,640 bytes.
Gemini Control Panel Gemini control panel - closeup of the pedestal controls between the two astronauts.
Credit: NASA. File Name: gempanbm.jpg. Image width: 685 pixels. Image height: 617 pixels. Image size: 79,207 bytes.
Gemini Control Panel Gemini Control Panel - closeup of the command astronaut (left hand seat) controls.
Credit: NASA. File Name: gempanl.jpg. Image width: 686 pixels. Image height: 846 pixels. Image size: 96,192 bytes.
Gemini Control Panel Gemini Control Panel - closeup of the second astronaut (right hand side) controls.
Credit: NASA. File Name: gempanr.jpg. Image width: 675 pixels. Image height: 697 pixels. Image size: 85,400 bytes.
Gemini Control Panel Gemini Control Panel - closeup of the center panel and overhead controls.
Credit: NASA. File Name: gempantm.jpg. Image width: 529 pixels. Image height: 927 pixels. Image size: 119,581 bytes.
Gemini Paraglider Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemparag.jpg. Image width: 286 pixels. Image height: 318 pixels. Image size: 13,879 bytes.
Gemini preflight Gemini spacecraft being prepared in the shop.
Credit: NASA. File Name: gemprefl.jpg. Image width: 395 pixels. Image height: 480 pixels. Image size: 42,452 bytes.
Rescue Gemini A version of Gemini was proposed for rescue of crews stranded in Earth orbit. This version, launched by a Titan 3C, used a transtage for maneuvering. The basic Gemini reentry module was extended to 120 inches (3.05 m) diameter to provide a passenger compartment for the rescued crew. The same concept would eventually be used for Big Gemini. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemrescu.jpg. Image width: 414 pixels. Image height: 136 pixels. Image size: 8,998 bytes.
Gemini ULRV Mission Mission Summary for Gemini Universal Lunar Rescue Vehicle.
Credit: Mark Wade. File Name: gemulrv.gif. Image width: 715 pixels. Image height: 559 pixels. Image size: 9,018 bytes.
Gemini Variants Modest modifications of Gemini proposed by McDonnell Douglas as a follow-on to the basic program (927 x 723 pixel version).
Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemvar1.jpg. Image width: 927 pixels. Image height: 723 pixels. Image size: 43,356 bytes.
Gemini Advanced More advanced versions of Gemini proposed by McDonnell Douglas as a follow-on to the basic program (927 x 723 pixel version).
Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemvar2.jpg. Image width: 872 pixels. Image height: 745 pixels. Image size: 44,467 bytes.
Winged Gemini Top view of Winged Gemini, the most radical modification proposed. Drawing on the results of the ASSET subscale winged reentry vehicle program, McDonnell proposed a version of the spacecraft using the same internal systems but capable of a piloted runway landing. The spacecraft was designed for launch by the standard Titan 2 Gemini Launch Vehicle. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemwin1.jpg. Image width: 355 pixels. Image height: 336 pixels. Image size: 18,315 bytes.
Winged Gemini Rear view of Winged Gemini, the most radical modification proposed. The Gemini propulsion systems contained in the basic Gemini retrograde and equipment modules would be repackaged within the jettisonable adapter section of the spacecraft. Five instead of four reentry rockets were required for retrofire due to the increased mass of the return vehicle. Swing wings would be deployed after reentry to allow for a runway landing. Credit: McDonnell Douglas. File Name: gemwin2.jpg. Image width: 388 pixels. Image height: 340 pixels. Image size: 28,131 bytes.
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