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astronautix.com Graphics Index Volume 126

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SECOR Credit: NASA. File Name: secor.jpg. Image width: 323 pixels. Image height: 309 pixels. Image size: 21,732 bytes.
Sedsat Credit: NASA. File Name: sedsat1.jpg. Image width: 288 pixels. Image height: 163 pixels. Image size: 11,092 bytes.
SERT Credit: NASA. File Name: sert.jpg. Image width: 328 pixels. Image height: 259 pixels. Image size: 21,856 bytes.
Apollo LES Test Credit: NASA. File Name: sestest.jpg. Image width: 194 pixels. Image height: 325 pixels. Image size: 12,235 bytes.
Dual Keel Station Dual Keel Space Station - 1986-87. The number of American crew modules was also reduced from four to two while European and Japanese laboratories were incorporated in the design for the first time. The habitable volume remained the same, though, since the length of the US modules was increased to 13.3 meters. Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sff2b.jpg. Image width: 628 pixels. Image height: 464 pixels. Image size: 58,262 bytes.
Fred Station Modules Fred Space Station Crew Modules. The length of the crew modules was reduced to 8.2 meters to reduce the weight while allowing them to be tested, integrated and outfitted on the ground rather than in space. The US laboratory and habitation modules are in the foreground. Two node modules were also deleted. The total pressurized volume was now 878 cubic meters. Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sff3.jpg. Image width: 601 pixels. Image height: 418 pixels. Image size: 80,488 bytes.
Lockheed Station-'80 Early 1980s Space Station Study (Lockheed). Lockheed's space station definition proposal from 1982-83 featured a spacecraft servicing facility (right) and several pressurized crew modules.
Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sffl84.jpg. Image width: 632 pixels. Image height: 479 pixels. Image size: 68,122 bytes.
Martin Station-'84 Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sffmm84.jpg. Image width: 361 pixels. Image height: 480 pixels. Image size: 34,391 bytes.
Dual Keel Station/86 Dual Keel Space Station - 1986-87. Rockwell "Dual Keel" Space Station proposal.
Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sffri86.jpg. Image width: 589 pixels. Image height: 437 pixels. Image size: 44,905 bytes.
Manned Flight Trends Annual Total Manned Spaceflight Hours 1961-2006
Credit: Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sflight1.gif. Image width: 640 pixels. Image height: 438 pixels. Image size: 6,558 bytes.
Manned Flight Trends Cumulative Total Manned Spaceflight Hours 1961-2006
Credit: Marcus Lindroos. File Name: sflight2.gif. Image width: 640 pixels. Image height: 438 pixels. Image size: 6,798 bytes.
SFU Space Flyer Unit Credit: NASDA. File Name: sfu.jpg. Image width: 150 pixels. Image height: 146 pixels. Image size: 6,957 bytes.
Spacehab Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. File Name: shabi.jpg. Image width: 626 pixels. Image height: 261 pixels. Image size: 39,615 bytes.
Shavit Credit: © Mark Wade. File Name: shavit.gif. Image width: 46 pixels. Image height: 137 pixels. Image size: 382 bytes.
Shavit File Name: shavitj.jpg. Image width: 98 pixels. Image height: 389 pixels. Image size: 10,965 bytes.
10 Crew Shelter File Name: sheltsta.jpg. Image width: 286 pixels. Image height: 327 pixels. Image size: 16,557 bytes.
Shenzhou Model Aft Unique view of the aft end of Shenzhou. The main propulsion system consists of four large expansion ratio main engines. Four groups of two large pitch / yaw thrusters are spaced around the inside of the flared service module skirt, with complementary groups of smaller thrusters mounted on the exterior of the skirt. The radiator loops of the service module wind around the module seven times (the same number as the early Soyuz 7K-OK design). The service module is 2.8 m in diameter at the flared base, 2.5 m in diameter over the radiator section, 2.4 m in diameter at the top, and 3.05 m in length (excluding the engines). This compares to 2.72 m base diameter, 2.15 m centre diameter, and 2.60 m length for the Soyuz. Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shenaft.jpg. Image width: 412 pixels. Image height: 385 pixels. Image size: 32,321 bytes.
Shenzhou Model Bot'm View of the 'bottom' of the Shenzhou model. Noteworthy, from left to right: probable orientation instruments (horizon, ion flow and/or stellar/sun sensors) at the middle of the service module; the robust pylons supporting the moveable solar panels; the thruster groups at the centre of gravity of the spacecraft, below the re-entry capsule, which would be used for rolling the spacecraft and for horizontal / vertical translation manoeuvres; the blue patch on the re-entry module (meaning unclear); the four groups of four thrusters at the base of the orbital module, which would provide auxiliary propulsion for the spacecraft and autonomous propulsion for the orbital module after separation; the white patch on the orbital module, indicating the entry hatch location; the forward porthole in the orbital module. The re-entry capsule is 2.4 m in diameter at the base, and, 2.0 m long (excluding the heat shield). This compares to 2.17 m diameter x 1.90 m for the Soyuz capsule. Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shenbotm.jpg. Image width: 622 pixels. Image height: 512 pixels. Image size: 37,634 bytes.
Shenzhou Model Fwd Forward view of Shenzhou model. Notice the unique configuration of the instrument pallet at the forward end; the arrangement of the reaction control thrusters at the base of the orbital module, which allow autonomous orientation and possibly manoeuvre of the module in orbit; and the rectangular package mounted opposite the entry hatch. The service module measures 2.2 m diameter x 2.8 m long. The complex equipment arranged at the top of the module is 0.95 m x 1.3 m and 0.8 m long. The semi-circular ring has a 1.1 m inner diameter and seems to provide mounting for rectangular instruments or processing samples around its exterior. The three perpendicular 0.4 m extendible probes are of uncertain purpose. They may be instrument booms; a part of the orientation system; or part of a docking system. Extendible booms were explored by the United States as a docking device for the Apollo spacecraft. It was expected that Shenzhou would have a Russian-style androgynous docking system at the forward end of the orbital module. It may be that the current model instead provides an external instrument pallet for experiments, which could be replaced on eventual station ferry missions with a docking system. Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shenfwd.jpg. Image width: 430 pixels. Image height: 510 pixels. Image size: 39,631 bytes.
Shenzhou Model Left View of the left side of Shenzhou. The re-entry capsule has the same aerodynamic surfaces on the upper part of the capsule, and the same cylindrical housing at the bottom as Soyuz. The capsule clearly took advantage of thirty years of Russian experience and refinement of the Soyuz capsule aerodynamic design. The purpose of the tan probe next to the rectangular housing at the top of the orbital module is not known. The arrangement of instruments arranged in an arc in the semicircular pallet mounted on the front of the orbital module is quite mysterious. Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shenleft.jpg. Image width: 609 pixels. Image height: 286 pixels. Image size: 38,197 bytes.
Shenzhou Model View of a 1/40 scale module of Shenzhou at the Chinese Astronautical Technology Research Group. Excluding the triangular sections, the lower solar panels of the service module measure 2.0 m x 7.5 m. Those of the orbital module are 2.0 m x 3.4 m. This indicates that the complete spacecraft can generate three times more power than Soyuz, providing an average of over 1.5 kW of electricity. In autonomous flight the orbital module would generate over 0.5 kW average. Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shenover.jpg. Image width: 546 pixels. Image height: 306 pixels. Image size: 39,332 bytes.
Shenzhou Model Right View of the right side of Shenzhou. The meaning of the second blue patch on the re-entry capsule is unknown. The entry hatch at the top of the orbital module can be seen, and the extendible probes mounted 90 degrees to one another at the forward end of the orbital module. Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shenrite.jpg. Image width: 599 pixels. Image height: 186 pixels. Image size: 22,300 bytes.
Shenzhou Model Top V View of the top side of Shenzhou. Note the large rectangular external package on the orbital module and the three extendible probes mounted at the forward end of the orbital module.
Credit: Steven S. Pietrobon. File Name: shentop.jpg. Image width: 604 pixels. Image height: 332 pixels. Image size: 32,377 bytes.
Shenzhou 2 Credit: © Simon Zajc. File Name: shenzac1.jpg. Image width: 751 pixels. Image height: 573 pixels. Image size: 36,855 bytes.
Shenzhou 2 Credit: © Simon Zajc. File Name: shenzac2.jpg. Image width: 497 pixels. Image height: 461 pixels. Image size: 49,022 bytes.
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