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Spacedock 1988
Spacedock 1988
Space Station Spacedock. This 1988 illustration depicts a large "Drive-thru" spacedock facility for assembly and checkout of manned lunar spacecraft.

Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. 40,581 bytes. 578 x 475 pixels.


Nation: USA. Agency: NASA.

After the 1986 Space Shuttle Challenger accident, a number of space policy reports ('Pioneering the Space Frontier', 'Leadership and America's Future in Space') advocated an aggressive manned lunar/Mars program to restore America's lead in space. NASA now embarked on a number of studies to see how the downscaled Space Station Freedom could assist this goal. This would involve use of a large spacedock facility for assembly and checkout of manned lunar or planetary spacecraft.


SpacedockSpacedock - Space Station Spacedock. This free-flying "spacedock" would be constructed from Space Station subsystems such as solar thermodynamic power generators, radiators, truss segments etc.. The white tanks contain rocket propellant for the space tug.

Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. 73,035 bytes. 599 x 479 pixels.


Three designs were considered:

The 'Platform' and 'Atrium' versions would have been bigger than the 'Drive-Thru', but their overall operation (e.g. attitude control/stability) and maintenance might have been easier. Most NASA studies preferred to develop a separate spacecraft assembly and checkout facility in order to minimise the impact on sensitive experiments onboard Space Station Freedom. One version of the 'spacedock' would be connected to the Space Station by a long tether. A space tug could receive a free boost from the centrifugal forces when it was released from such a tether. An alternative free-flying 'spacedock' could be constructed from Space Station subsystems such as solar thermodynamic power generators, radiators, truss segments etc.. Tanks would contain rocket propellant for a space tug. The large walls on the side of the spacedock's box-like structure provided thermal protection.


Tether and SpacedockTether and Spacedock - Space Station Spacedock. Most NASA studies preferred to develop a separate spacecraft assembly & checkout facility in order to minimize the impact on sensitive experiments onboard Space Station Freedom. This "spacedock" would be connected to the Space Station by a long tether. The space tug (top) will receive a free boost from the centrifugal forces when it releases the tether

Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. 30,353 bytes. 535 x 404 pixels.


Article by Marcus Lindroos
Specification



SpacedockSpacedock - Space Station Spacedock. The "Drive-thru" spacedock would have weighed more than twice as much as the basic Space Station Freedom, which had an in-orbit mass of 200 metric tons. Lunar transfer vehicles would have been assembled, serviced and refueled inthe rectangular enclosure on top.

Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. 25,766 bytes. 640 x 480 pixels.



SpacedockSpacedock - Space Station Spacedock. The "Platform" spacedock would have featured a large gravity gradient-stabilized extension at the bottom. The Canadian MobileServicing Center would have been capable of moving up and down this structure,transporting the lunar spacecraft stack along the way.

Credit: NASA via Marcus Lindroos. 12,315 bytes. 640 x 350 pixels.



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Last update 12 March 2001.
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© Mark Wade, 2001 .