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astronautix.com NASDA Japanese Experiment Module

NASDA JEM 1999
NASDA JEM 1999 -

Credit: NASDA via Marcus Lindroos. 12,029 bytes. 320 x 199 pixels.



Nation: Japan. Agency: NASDA.

The Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) has been a rare island of stability in the often tumultuous Space Station program. Conceived in 1985, JEM consists of a pressurised laboratory mainly dedicated to advanced technology experiments, a logistics module, an unpressurised pallet for vacuum experiments in space plus a small robotic arm. The Japanese National Space Development Agency (NASDA) formally submitted the JEM proposal to NASA in March 1986. The Japanese Space Activities Commission recommended formal participation in the Space Station project five months later and the JEM design changed little since the mid-1980s.

In 1986 the Japanese contribution was estimated to be worth $1.9-3.2 billion for a JEM launch in 1995. By 1990, the schedule had slipped by three years due to NASA budget cuts and Space Station cost overruns. The delays increased the JEM's total cost slightly, from $2.3 billion in 1986 to $2.63 billion in 1993, when the launch was postponed to 1999. Final hardware production began in the mid-1990s and the Japanese robotic arm was tested on a NASA Space Shuttle flight in August 1997. According to current plans, the JEM will be launched in 2002-03.

Like the other International Space Station modules, the interior of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) consists of modular refrigerator-sized 'payload racks.' JEM has twelve such racks but some are required for the module's internal functions. Five racks are available for experiments.


NASDA JEM 1999NASDA JEM 1999

Credit: NASDA via Marcus Lindroos. 52,465 bytes. 631 x 427 pixels.


Article by Marcus Lindroos
Specification



NASDA JEMNASDA JEM - NASDA Japanese Experiment Module. Japanese Experiment Module (JEM).

Credit: NASDA via Marcus Lindroos. 40,834 bytes. 640 x 479 pixels.



Inside NASDA JEMInside NASDA JEM - Inside Japanese Experiment Module. Like the other International Space Station modules, the interior of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) consists of modular refrigerator-sized "payload racks." JEM has twelve such racks but some are required for the module's internal functions. Five racks are available for experiments.

Credit: NASDA via Marcus Lindroos. 33,810 bytes. 640 x 255 pixels.



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