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astronautix.com Mars 2MV-4

Mars 1 / 2MV-4
Mars 1 / 2MV-4 - Mars 2MV-4. Other spacecraft in the 2MV series were similar.

Credit: NASA. 22,262 bytes. 329 x 229 pixels.



Manufacturer's Designation: 2MV-4. Class: Planetary. Type: Mars. Nation: USSR. Manufacturer: Korolev.

Mars probe intended to photograph Mars on a flyby trajectory. It carried various scientific and communications equipment including a magnetometer probe, a high-gain antenna, an omnidirectional antenna, a semi-directional antenna, and photographic equipment.


Specification

Total Mass: 894 kg.


Mars 2MV-4 Chronology


24 October 1962 Sputnik 22 Program: Mars. Launch Site: Baikonur . Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78. FAILURE: 16 seconds after ignition of Stage 4, Block L's S1.5400A1 engine exploded. A lubricant leak resulted in the jamming of a shaft in the turbopump gearbox and break up of the turbine. Mass: 6,500 kg. Perigee: 202 km. Apogee: 260 km. Inclination: 65.1 deg.

Mars probe intended to photograph Mars on a flyby trajectory. The spacecraft broke into many pieces, some of which apparently remained in Earth orbit for a few days. This occurred during the Cuban missile crisis and was picked up by U.S. military radar installations, who originally feared it might by the start of a Soviet nuclear attack.


01 November 1962 Mars 1 Program: Mars. Launch Site: Baikonur . Launch Vehicle: Molniya 8K78. Mass: 894 kg.

Mars probe intended to photograph Mars on a flyby trajectory. Sixty-one radio transmissions were held in which a large amount of data was collected. On March 21, 1963, when the spacecraft was at a distance of 106 million km communications ceased, possibly due to a malfunction in the spacecraft orientation system. Mars 1 closest approach to Mars occurred on June 19, 1963 at a distance of approximately 193,000 km, after which the spacecraft entered a heliocentric orbit. Announced mission: Prolonged exploration of outer space during flight to the planet Mars; establishment of inter-planetary radio communications; photgraphing of the planet Mars and subsquent radio-transmission to Earth of the photographs of the surface of Mars thus obtained.



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Last update 12 March 2001.
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