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astronautix.com Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft

Gemini Lunar SRS
Gemini Lunar SRS - Cutaway model of the Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft, with landing gear in stowed position. This version of Gemini would allow a direct lunar landing mission on a single Saturn V flight. It was proposed as an Apollo rescue vehicle. A single Gemini LSSS would be landed near the planned lunar landing site before an Apollo mission. In the event of a failure of the Apollo lunar module, the Gemini LSSS would return the two Apollo astronauts on the surface directly to earth.

Credit: McDonnell Douglas. 38,225 bytes. 228 x 437 pixels.



Manufacturer's Designation: McDonnell-Douglas. Class: Manned. Type: Lunar Rescue. Nation: USA. Agency: NASA. Manufacturer: McDonnell-Douglas.

This version of Gemini would allow a direct lunar landing mission to be undertaken in a single Saturn V flight, although it was only proposed as an Apollo rescue vehicle. The unmanned spacecraft would make a landing near a stranded Apollo lunar module. An extended Gemini reentry capsule had a passenger compartment for up to three rescued astronauts. The basic LSRS design used three modified Apollo Lunar Module descent stages for lunar orbit insertion, lunar landing, and lunar ascent.

An alternate configuration used two Apollo Service Modules and a repackaged LM descent stage. The first Service Module completed the translunar injection maneuver begun by the S-IVB stage; the second SM accomplished lunar orbit insertion and then functioned as a 'lunar crasher' stage, bringing the Gemini to just above the lunar surface. The Gemini and the third transearth-lunar landing stage would then hover to a landing near the stranded lunar module. The same final stage then boosted the Gemini capsule into a transearth trajectory.


Specification

Craft.Crew Size: 3. Total Length: 12.6 m. Maximum Diameter: 6.2 m. Total Habitable Volume: 5.00 m3. Total Mass: 46,000 kg. Total Propellants: 36,400 kg. Primary Engine Thrust: 8,980 kgf. Main Engine Propellants: N2O4/UDMH. Main Engine Isp: 311 sec. Total spacecraft delta v: 5,600 m/s.


Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft Chronology


11 May 1966 Plans for Apollo space rescue discontinued Program: Apollo.


Gemini Lunar SRSGemini Lunar SRS - Exploded view of the Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft. From top to bottom: the Gemini reentry module; the lunar ascent stage; the lunar descent stage; the lunar orbit insertion stage.

Credit: McDonnell Douglas. 23,395 bytes. 183 x 465 pixels.


MSC Deputy Director George M. Low recommended to Maxime A. Faget, MSC, that, in light of Air Force and Aerospace Corp. studies on space rescue, MSC plans for a general study on space rescue be discontinued and a formal request be made to OMSF to cancel the request for proposals, which had not yet been released. As an alternative, Low suggested that MSC should cooperate with the Air Force to maximize gains from the USAF task on space rescue requirements.

Gemini Lunar SRSGemini Lunar SRS - Cutaway model of the Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft, in the lunar surface configuration, with the landing gear in extended position. The ascent stage would boost the two astronauts in their Gemini capsule into a transearth trajectory for an ocean splashdown and recovery.

Credit: McDonnell Douglas. 26,414 bytes. 390 x 466 pixels.



Bibliography:



Gemini ULRV MissionGemini ULRV Mission - Mission Summary for Gemini Universal Lunar Rescue Vehicle.

Credit: Mark Wade. 9,018 bytes. 715 x 559 pixels.



Gemini Lunar SRSGemini Lunar SRS - Gemini Lunar Surface Rescue Spacecraft. This spacecraft would be piloted by two crew to a landing near a stranded Apollo lunar module. The extended Gemini reentry capsule had a passenger compartment for the two rescued astronauts. The LSRS used three Lunar Module descent stages for lunar orbit insertion, lunar landing, and lunar ascent.

Credit: McDonnell Douglas. 51,464 bytes. 538 x 408 pixels.



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Last update 12 March 2001.
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© Mark Wade, 2001 .