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Jews in the Russian Empire

Renewed Oppression - the "May Laws," cont.


Group of Jewish soldiers...



The worsening of the situation...



In all major cities...



The Great or Central Synagogue
in Arkhipova Street...


The anti-Semitic campaigns intensify after Alexander III and his family miraculously survive a railway accident in 1888. The head of the Holy Synod and the Czar's spiritual adviser, K. Pobedonostsev, interprets this as a "sign from above" to turn away from the path of reform.

In 1887, the number of Jewish students entering secondary schools in the Pale is restricted to 10 percent. As in some towns Jews constitute 50 to 70 percent of the population, many high school classes remain half empty. In 1891 a degree is passed that the Jews of Moscow, who had settled in the city since 1865, are to be expelled. Within a few months about 20,000 people are forced to give up their homes and livelihood and deported to the already overcrowded Pale.

Alexander III dies in 1894 during a holiday in Yalta, some weeks after he had ordered the Jews from that city expelled as a precautionary measure.


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