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G. Yavlinski about Yeltsin on January 9, 1997.

The following text is an excerpt from
OMRI Daily Digest, Vol. 3, No. 7, 10 January 1997.
Copyright 1997 OMRI. All Rights Reserved.

YAVLINSKII: SICK OR WELL, YELTSIN UNABLE TO RUN RUSSIA.
Yabloko leader Grigorii Yavlinskii told "Ekho Mosvky" on 9 January that President Yeltsin is incapable of ruling Russia -- not because of his illness, but because of "the way he sees the political situation, grasps it, selects people, makes decisions, assigns tasks, and his general abilities to resolve the problems our country is facing." He claimed that since nobody in the president's circle understands what policies are needed, it is irrelevant whether Yeltsin is in the Kremlin or the Central Clinical Hospital. However, Yavlinskii did not call for the president to resign, noting that citizens had elected Yeltsin and their choice must be respected. Commenting on repeated calls for Yeltsin's resignation by former Security Council Secretary Aleksandr Lebed, Yavlinskii pointed out that Lebed helped Yeltsin get re-elected by joining his team after the first round of the presidential race. -- Laura Belin

Russian newspapers about Yeltsin.

IZVESTIYA: RUSSIA FENDS FOR ITSELF WHILE YELTSIN IS ILL.
While officials play down Yeltsin's illness, some journalists are expressing skepticism about the president's health. In an editorial on 10 January, "Izvestiya" said it is clear that Yeltsin is seriously ill, and expressed concern for the country's stability. Like many other papers, Izvestiya avoided covering Yeltsin's health problems during his re-election campaign. Vitalii Tretyakov, editor of Nezavisimaya gazeta, wrote in the paper's 10 January edition that "The country is much sicker than the president." Meanwhile, the weekly Obshchaya gazeta for 9-15 January wrote that a Kremlin censor vetted all television footage of Yeltsin's meeting with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl to delete everything that betrayed the true state of Yeltsin's health. -- Nikolai Iakoubovski
This material was reprinted with permission of the
Open Media Research Institute, a nonprofit organization
with research offices in Prague, Czech Republic.
For more information on OMRI publications, please write to:
info@omri.cz


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