U N I T E D S T A T E S

I N F O R M A T I O N A G E N C Y

Training Program with the Newly Independent States: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan

ACTION: Notice - Request for Proposals

SUMMARY

The Office of Citizen Exchanges, Division of Russia/Eurasia of the United States Information Agency's Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs announces a competitive grants program. Public or private non-profit organizations meeting the provisions described in IRS regulation 501 (c) (3) may apply to develop training programs in (1) local government and public administration, (2) business administration and business development, (3) rule of law, and (4) independent media development for the following countries: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.

Overall grant making authority for this program is contained in the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, Public Law 87-256, as amended, also known as the Fulbright-Hays Act. The purpose of the Act is "to enable the Government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries...; to strengthen the ties which unite us with other nations by demonstrating the educational and cultural interests, developments, and achievements of the people of the United States and other nations....and thus to assist in the development of friendly, sympathetic and peaceful relations between the United States and the other countries of the world." The funding authority for the program cited above is provided through the Fulbright-Hays Act and the Freedom Support Act.

Programs and projects must conform with Agency requirements and guidelines outlined in the Application Package. USIA projects and programs are subject to the availability of funds.

ANNOUNCEMENT NAME AND NUMBER

All communications with USIA concerning this announcement should refer to the above title and reference number E/PN-95-16.

DATES

Deadline for proposals: All copies must be received at the U.S. Information Agency by 5 p.m. Washington, D.C. time on Wednesday, November 30, 1994. Faxed documents will not be accepted, nor will documents postmarked on November 30, 1994 but received at a later date. It is the responsibility of each applicant to ensure that proposals are received by the above deadline.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT

Office of Citizen Exchanges, Russia/Eurasia Division, E/PN, Room 216, U.S. Information Agency, 301 4th Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20547, tel: 202-619-5326, fax: 202-619-4350, to request an Application Package, which includes more detailed award criteria; all application forms; and guidelines for preparing proposals, including specific criteria for preparation of the proposal budget. Please specify USIA Program Specialist Ruth Leeb on all inquiries and correspondence. Interested applicants should read the complete Federal Register announcement before addressing inquiries to the Office of Citizen Exchanges, Russia/Eurasia Division or submitting their proposals. Once the RFP deadline has passed, the Office of Citizen Exchanges, Russia/Eurasia Division may not discuss this competition in any way with applicants until after the Bureau proposal review process has been completed.

ADDRESSES

Applicants must follow all instructions given in the Application Package and send only complete applications to:

U.S. Information Agency

Ref.: E/P-95-16

Office of Grants Management, E/XE, Room 336

301 4th Street, S.W.

Washington, D.C. 20547

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION

Pursuant to the Bureau's authorizing legislation, programs must maintain a non-political character and should be balanced and representative of the diversity of American political, social, and cultural life. "Diversity" should be interpreted in the broadest sense and encompass differences including but not limited to race, gender, religion, geographic location, socio-economic status, and physical challenges. Applicants are strongly encouraged to adhere to the advancement of this principle.

Overview: USIA is interested in proposals that encourage the growth of democratic institutions in the NIS. The main areas are local government and public administration; rule of law; business management; and media.

The projects may include: internships; study tours; short-term, non-technical training; consultations; and extended, intensive workshops taking place in the United States or in the countries listed in this announcement.

We encourage applicants to design creative training programs aimed at non-English speakers both for in-country as well as for U.S.-based training projects. USIA is interested in proposals whose designs take into account the need for ongoing sharing of information and training. Examples include: "train the trainers" models; the creation of indigenous training centers; plans to create professional networks or professional associations to share information.

NOTE: While this competition may fund programs in which American universities work with NIS counterparts, it is not intended to be a university linkage program. Such programs are funded by USIA's Office of Academic Programs (E/A) and proposals whose purpose is to exchange faculty or otherwise support direct academic links should be submitted under the E/A RFP for the University Linkage Programs.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

USIA is interested in proposals for training programs that foster effective administration of local and regional governments.

Programs in Public Administration for Kazakhstan will not be accepted.

Proposals are encouraged for the following themes/topics which have been requested by USIA's posts in Ukraine and Russia:

* RUSSIA: Projects that build the capacity of local training institutions and that use Russian language materials are strongly encouraged. Proposals that show support from local administrations in Russia -- city or oblast -- will receive priority. USIA is particularly interested in exchange programs designed for regional legislators. A principle preoccupation of Russian lawmakers at the moment is the relationship between national and regional governments and the division of power between them. Programming that takes place in the United States for these local officials should include meetings and discussions in Washington, DC and in state capitols. Programs that emphasize the practical ramifications of a federated system of government will receive particular consideration. Proposals should be very specific, emphasizing concrete, tangible results that leave something behind in Russia once projects are completed.

* UKRAINE: Priority will be given to programs on themes such as: setting up a civil service and the concept of merit-based recruitment; the relationship between government and business; how to create a business-friendly environment through local laws and practices; combatting corruption in law enforcement officials; governmental budgeting processes; taxation; privatization of government services; models of local government, including city manager, city council, county government; regional planning at multi-city, multi-county level; and administration of civic organizations such as library school boards, community centers. Ukrainian partner institutions might include the Institute of Public Administration in Kiev, the Lviv Management Institute, the International Management Institute in Kiev, or similar institutions.

RULE OF LAW

For all NIS countries, USIA is interested in proposals for parliamentary exchanges that offer a substantive professional visit to the United States for groups of elected legislators and their staffs, at both national and regional levels. The focus of these programs should be essentially political in nature since other US Government funders are providing technical assistance to NIS parliaments. Programs can be designed around a specific theme (e.g., budget and finance, legislative and parliamentary procedure, oversight of law enforcement) or can serve as a vehicle to introduce leaders of NIS parliaments to US Congressional leadership. Establishing contacts with US Members of Congress is a major goal of the program. Proposals for groups composed of deputies or a combination of deputies and professional staff are acceptable, but mixing of local and national officials in one group is not encouraged (unless a compelling program rationale is given). Visits to state legislatures in the United States are encouraged. Particular care must be taken to coordinate participant lists with the American Embassy in the given NIS country. In general, the American Embassies will issue the formal invitations to parliamentarians to participate in a given program.

For Russia, USIA is interested in programs in civics education that focus on the role of citizenry in fostering good government and the importance of ethics in government. Seminars in Russia and the development of materials in Russian are encouraged.

For Ukraine, USIA is interested in programs that offer training in the administration of local courts.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND DEVELOPMENT

USIA will consider projects in Business Administration and Development for all NIS countries except Russia and Kazakhstan. Preference will be given to projects in Ukraine and the Central Asian countries.

USIA's definition of business development and administration is broad. It includes: small business development, economic privatization and agri-business development, including food distribution systems or the role of family farms. USIA is interested in projects that strengthen university business departments and provide management training for people already in the work place. In addition, the following USIS posts have expressed interest in the following specific themes:

* UKRAINE: Proposals are encouraged on the following themes: Business ethics; entrepreneurship; how to start a small business; how to promote business; and business curriculum development.

INDEPENDENT MEDIA DEVELOPMENT

USIA is interested in media training proposals that focus on journalistic training, management of media organizations and foster independent media. Journalistic training in basic skills and concepts could include: effective writing, investigative reporting, objectivity, the clear labeling of editorials and opinion pieces, intellectual property issues and ethics.

Media management training (both print and electronic) should focus on management of media as a business: management techniques, desk top publishing, advertising, marketing, distribution, personnel, public relations, and the financial benefits and pitfalls of journalistic advocacy. USIS posts in the following countries have indicated their priority themes:

* RUSSIA: Special consideration will be given to media training projects that offer US-based internships for Russian journalists and media managers. USIA is interested in proposals that employ an open competition mechanism in Russian to select participants. Interested organizations should have experience placing both journalists and media managers in internships in the United States.

* GEORGIA: Proposals in media training that include a U.S.-based internship for six to eight weeks for print and TV journalists. The participants would be selected directly by the U.S. Embassy.

* UKRAINE: The following topics have priority: ethics in journalism; straight news reporting; marketing and advertising in print and broadcast media.

* KYRGYZSTAN: Media proposals for Kyrgyzstan will not be accepted in this competition.

Guidelines: Programs must comply with J-1 visa regulations. Please refer to program specific guidelines in the Application Package for further details.

Proposed budget: Organizations must submit a comprehensive line item budget based on the specific guidance in the Program and Budget Guidelines sections of the Application Package. Proposals for less than $200,000 will receive preference.

Grants awarded to eligible organizations with less than four years of experience in conducting international exchange programs will be limited to $60,000.

Applicants are invited to submit an all-inclusive budget as well as separate sub-budgets for each program component, phase, location, or activity in order to facilitate USIA decisions on funding.

REVIEW PROCESS

USIA will acknowledge receipt of all proposals and will review them for technical eligibility. Proposals will be deemed ineligible if they do not fully adhere to the guidelines stated herein and in the Application Package. Eligible proposals will be forwarded to panels of USIA officers for advisory review. All eligible proposals will also be reviewed by the Agency contracts office, as well as the USIA Office of East European and NIS Affairs and the USIA post overseas, where appropriate. Proposals may also be reviewed by the Office of the General Counsel or by other Agency elements. Funding decisions are at the discretion of the USIA Associate Director for Educational and Cultural Affairs. Final technical authority for grant awards resides with the USIA grants officer.

REVIEW CRITERIA

Technically eligible applications will be competitively reviewed according to the criteria stated below. These criteria are not rank ordered:

1. Quality of the program idea: Proposals should exhibit originality, substance, precision, and relevance to Agency mission.

2. Program planning: Detailed agenda and relevant work plan should demonstrate substantive undertakings and logistical capacity. Agenda and plan should adhere to the program overview and guidelines described above.

3. Ability to achieve program objectives: Objectives should be reasonable, feasible, and flexible. Proposals should clearly demonstrate how the institution will meet the program's objectives and plan.

4. Multiplier effect/impact: Proposed programs should strengthen long-term mutual understanding, including maximum sharing of information and establishment of long-term institutional and individual linkages.

5. Cross Cultural/Area Expertise: Proposals should reflect the institution's expertise in the subject area and should address specific areas of concern facing countries involved in the project. Additionally, projects should show evidence of sensitivity to historical, linguistic and other cross cultural factors and should demonstrate how this sensitivity will be used in practical aspects of the program, such as pre-departure orientations or briefings of American hosts.

6. Support of Diversity: Proposals should demonstrate the recipient's commitment to promoting the awareness and understanding of diversity throughout the program. This can be accomplished through documentation (such as a written statement or account) summarizing past and/or on-going activities and efforts that further the principle of diversity within both the organization and the program activities.

7. Institutional Capacity: Proposed personnel and institutional resources should be adequate and appropriate to achieve the program or project's goals.

8. Institution's Record/Ability: Proposals should demonstrate an institutional record of successful exchange programs, including responsible fiscal management and full compliance with all reporting requirements for past Agency grants as determined by USIA's Office of Contracts. The Agency will consider the past performance of prior recipients and the demonstrated potential of new applicants.

9. Follow-on Activities: Proposals should provide a plan for continued follow-on activity (without USIA support) which insures that USIA supported programs are not isolated events.

10. Project Evaluation: Proposals should include a plan to evaluate the activity's success, both as the activities unfold and at the end of the program. USIA recommends that the proposal include a draft survey questionnaire or other technique plus description of a methodology to use to link outcomes to original project objectives. Award-receiving organizations/institutions will be expected to submit intermediate reports after each project component is concluded or quarterly, whichever is less frequent.

11. Cost-effectiveness: The overhead and administrative components of the proposal, including salaries and honoraria, should be kept as low as possible. All other items should be necessary and appropriate.

12. Cost-sharing: Proposals should maximize cost-sharing through other private sector support as well as institutional direct funding contributions.

13. Value to U.S.-Partner Country Relations: Proposed projects should receive positive assessments by USIA's geographic area desk and overseas officers of program need, potential impact, and significance in the partner country(ies).

NOTICE

The terms and conditions published in this RFP are binding and may not be modified by any USIA representative. Explanatory information provided by the Agency that contradicts published language will not be binding. Issuance of the RFP does not constitute an award commitment on the part of the Government. The needs of the program may require the award to be reduced, revised, or increased. Final awards cannot be made until funds have been appropriated by Congress, allocated and committed through internal USIA procedures.

NOTIFICATION

All applicants will be notified of the results of the review process on or about March 15, 1995. Awards made will be subject to periodic reporting and evaluation requirements.

Published in the Federal Register September 15, 1994.

* * * * * *

Statement of Work / Program Specific Guidelines

Training Program with the Newly Independent States: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.

Reference number: E/P-95-16

The Statement of Work/Program Guidelines apply specifically to the Request for Proposals (RFP) issued by the Russia/Eurasia Division, E/PN, for the NIS Training Program. Proposals must conform to the Federal Register announcement, the Guidelines stated in this document, and other components of the Application Package. Applications not adhering to the conditions set forth herein may be deemed technically ineligible.

These guidelines are specific to the program mentioned above and are IN ADDITION TO the Standard Guidelines for Bureau assistance awards which are also in this Application Package. In any instance that there is a perceived disparity between the standard or program specific Guidelines and the program information supplied in the accompanying Federal Register RFP, the RFP is to be the dominant reference.

Consultation with USIS or American Embassy staff in the development of a training proposal is encouraged. In some countries the Embassies play an active role, from participant selection to development of topics and program content. As noted above, applicants should consult the USIS office at the U.S. Embassies before submitting proposals.

The decision to submit a proposal should not be taken lightly. Competition for USIA funding is always keen and this program is among the most highly competitive. The selection of grantee institutions will depend on program substance; cross-cultural sensitivity; the applicant's familiarity with the substantive issues in the grant proposal; and proven ability to carry out the program successfully. Since USIA grant assistance constitutes only a portion of the total project funding, proposals should list and provide evidence of other anticipated sources of financial and in-kind support. Cost-sharing is strongly recommended; it indicates a commitment on the part of the prospective grantee institution to the project.

Proposals for less than $200,000 will receive preference. Organizations with less than four years of not-for-profit status are limited to grants of $60,000. All applicants must demonstrate successful experience in managing international exchange programs.

I.STATEMENT OF WORK

Institutions should present a detailed work plan, including a reasonable time table; a description of all phases in the project; and implementation (day-to-day handling of logistics and management of the delegation).

Selection of Participants

The proposal should clearly describe the type of person who will participate in the program and the reasons for participation. The process used to identify prospective candidates should be described (e.g., nominations from employers, open competition, applications, interviews, etc.).

Selection of US and foreign participants should reflect all forms of diversity (race, gender, geographic region, etc.)

Grantee institutions are expected to develop the initial slates of candidates. However, USIS or American Embassies retain the right to make the final choice and to accept or deny participants recommended by the grantee institution. In some cases, the USIS office may wish to control selection completely. Again, as noted above, consultation with USIS officers is encouraged before drafting a proposal.

Materials Development

USIA encourages the development of written materials in Russian, Ukrainian, or other local languages to enhance the training programs. Organizations should canvas their own resources and, to the extent possible, use already translated material.

If not already available, glossaries of specialized terms in the fields of public administration, business, rule of law and media should be developed in Russian, Ukrainian and, if feasible, other local languages.

In developing written materials, consideration should be given to their wider use, beyond the immediate training program at hand. USIA is interested in organizations' ideas on how to "reuse" specialized materials by providing them to universities, libraries or other institutions for use by a larger audience.

II.PROGRAM SPECIFIC GUIDELINES

Pursuant to the Bureau's authorizing legislation, programs must maintain a non-political character and should be balanced and representative of the diversity of American political, social and cultural life.

USIA will give careful consideration to proposals that demonstrate:

1) in-depth, substantive knowledge of the issues of concern to these countries;

2) first-hand connections with the institutions in the country and a commitment to continue the institutional relationship after the completion of the grant period;

3) the capacity to organize and manage the exchange, including appropriate orientation for the participants, handling of all pre-departure arrangements and coordination of the program in the United States. Specific arrangements will vary by country; please consult USIS posts before preparing proposals.

NOTE: While this competition may fund programs in which American universities work with NIS counterparts, it is not intended to be a university linkage program. Such programs are funded by USIA's Office of Academic Programs (E/A) and proposals whose purpose is to exchange faculty or otherwise support direct academic links should be submitted under the E/A RFP for the University Linkage Programs.

COST-SHARING

A proposal's cost-effectiveness -- including in-kind contributions and ability to keep administrative costs low -- is a major consideration in the review process. Cost-sharing may be in the form of allowable direct or indirect costs. The Recipient must maintain written records to support all allowable costs which are claimed as being its contribution to cost participation, as well as costs to be paid by the Federal government. Such records are subject to audit. The basis for determining the value of cash and in-kind contributions must be in accordance with OMB Circular A-110, Attachment E, "Cost-Sharing and Matching" and should be described in the proposal. In the event that the Recipient does not provide the minimum amount of cost-sharing as stipulated in the Recipient's budget, the Agency's contribution will be reduced in proportion to the Recipient's contribution.

FUNDING

The following program and administrative items are eligible for consideration for funding:

1. International and domestic air fares; transit costs; ground transportation costs.

2. Per diem. Organizations should use the published federal per diem rates for the individual American cities as well as for the NIS cities included in the proposal. Please keep in mind that the per diem rates in the NIS can be significantly reduced if in-country expenses are cost-shared with partner institutions.

3. Escort-Interpreters. Interpretation for foreign participants is provided by the State Department's Language Services Division. USIA grants do not pay for foreign interpreters to accompany delegations from their home country. Grant proposal budgets should contain a flat $140/day per diem for each State Department interpreter, as well as home-program-home air transportation of $400 per interpreter and any U.S. travel expenses during the program itself. Salary expenses are covered separately and are not part of a grantee's budget proposal.

4. Book and cultural allowances. Participants are entitled to a one-time book allowance payment of approximately $200; a cultural allowance of $150 is also allowed per participant. Accompanying staff do not get these benefits. Escort interpreters are reimbursed for actual expenses incurred for accompanying participants to cultural events.

5. Consultants. Consultants from outside the grantee organizations may be used to provide specialized expertise or to make presentations. Daily honoraria generally do not exceed $250/day. Subcontracting organizations may also be used. The written agreement between the prospective grantee and subcontractor must be included in the proposal. Principal administrative responsibility must reside with prospective grantee institutions, not subcontractors or consultants.

6. Materials development. Proposals may contain costs to purchase, develop and translate materials for participants. Grant funds may not be used to purchase equipment.

7. Room rental, generally not to exceed $250/day.

8. One working meal per project. Per capita costs may not exceed $5-8 for a lunch and $14-20 for a dinner. The number of invited guests may not exceed number of participants by more than a factor of two.

9. Travel allowances of $70 each way for each participant which will be used for incidental expenditures incurred during international travel.

10. Other costs necessary for the effective administration of the program, including salaries for grant organization employees, benefits and other direct and indirect costs, per detailed instructions in the Application Package.

All participants are covered under the terms of a USIA-sponsored health insurance policy. The premium is paid directly to the insurance company by USIA.

PROPOSAL CONTENTS

Applicants should submit a carefully written proposal that describes their program in a convincing and comprehensive manner. Applicants should relate the proposal to the criteria set forth in the solicitation and the Statement of Work as clearly as possible, since there is no opportunity for applicants to meet with reviewing officials.

Proposals should address succinctly, but completely, the elements described below and must follow all format requirements. Proposals should include the items highlighted in these Guidelines in the following numerical and/or alphabetical order outlined.

Executive Summary

In one double-spaced page, provide the following information about the project:

1. Name of organization/participating institutions

2. Beginning and ending date of the program

3. Proposed theme

4. Nature of activity

5. Funding level requested from USIA, total program cost, total cost-sharing from

applicant and other sources

6. Scope and Goals

a. Number and description of participants

b. Wider audience benefitting from program (overall impact)

c. Geographic diversity of program, both US and overseas

d. Fields covered

e. Anticipated results (short and long-term)

Narrative

Within 20 double-spaced, single sided pages, provide a detailed description of the project addressing the areas listed below.

1. Vision (statement of need, objectives, goals, benefits)

2. Participating Organizations

3. Program Activities (advertisement, recruitment, orientation, academic component,

cultural program, participant monitoring)

4. Program Evaluation

5. Follow-on

6. Project Management

7. Project Direction

8. Work Plan/Time Frame

Additional Material to be Submitted

1. Letters of Endorsement

2. Calendar of Activities/Itinerary

3. Other

Budget Submission

Resumes

Resumes of all program staff should be included in the submission. No one resume should exceed two pages.

Technical Format Requirements

1. Submit the original, signed cover sheet

2. Provide 15 copies of the proposal package

3. Include double-spaced, single-sided executive summary and narrative

4. Provide proposal budget per guidelines in the Application Package

5. Submit all necessary information (Application cover sheet, required forms, additional

information)

6. Number all pages, including budget and addenda, and provide a Table of Contents

7. Use 8 1/2" x 11" paper for entire proposal package

Optional--Provide proposal on DOS formatted disk; this must be accompanied with a memo explaining software used. This is in addition to the original and 14 hard copies.

REVIEW PROCESS

Proposals are reviewed for adherence to legal and budgetary requirements by USIA offices responsible for these functions. For program content and cost-effectiveness, the review is conducted by an advisory, grant-review panel composed of USIA officers. Additional USIA officers, including geographic area personnel, also review proposals for feasibility as well as potential for short- and long-term impact. The Associate Director for Educational and Cultural Affairs approves conferring the assistance award (grant or cooperative agreement) to an applicant. Final technical authority for assistance awards resides with an Agency Grants Officer.

In addition, panels review proposals according to the following criteria:

1. Quality of the program idea: Proposals should exhibit originality, substance, precision, and relevance to Agency mission.

2. Program planning: Detailed agenda and relevant work plan should demonstrate substantive undertakings and logistical capacity. Agenda and plan should adhere to the program overview and guidelines described above.

3. Ability to achieve program objectives: Objectives should be reasonable, feasible, and flexible. Proposals should clearly demonstrate how the institution will meet the program's objectives and plan.

4. Multiplier effect/impact: Proposed programs should strengthen long-term mutual understanding, including maximum sharing of information and establishment of long-term institutional and individual linkages.

5. Cross Cultural/Area Expertise: Proposals should reflect the institution's expertise in the subject area and should address specific areas of concern facing countries involved in the project. Additionally, projects should show evidence of sensitivity to historical, linguistic and other cross cultural factors and should demonstrate how this sensitivity will be used in practical aspects of the program, such as pre-departure orientations or briefings of American hosts.

6. Support of Diversity: Proposals should demonstrate the recipient's commitment to promoting the awareness and understanding of diversity throughout the program. This can be accomplished through documentation (such as a written statement or account) summarizing past and/or on-going activities and efforts that further the principle of diversity within both the organization and the program activities.

7. Institutional Capacity: Proposed personnel and institutional resources should be adequate and appropriate to achieve the program or project's goals.

8. Institution's Record/Ability: Proposals should demonstrate an institutional record of successful exchange programs, including responsible fiscal management and full compliance with all reporting requirements for past Agency grants as determined by USIA's Office of Contracts. The Agency will consider the past performance of prior recipients and the demonstrated potential of new applicants.

9. Follow-on Activities: Proposals should provide a plan for continued follow-on activity (without USIA support) which insures that USIA supported programs are not isolated events.

10. Project Evaluation: Proposals should include a plan to evaluate the activity's success, both as the activities unfold and at the end of the program. USIA recommends that the proposal include a draft survey questionnaire or other technique plus description of a methodology to use to link outcomes to original project objectives. Award-receiving organizations/institutions will be expected to submit intermediate reports after each project component is concluded or quarterly, whichever is less frequent.

11. Cost-effectiveness: The overhead and administrative components of the proposal, including salaries and honoraria, should be kept as low as possible. All other items should be necessary and appropriate.

12. Cost-sharing: Proposals should maximize cost-sharing through other private sector support as well as institutional direct funding contributions.

13. Value to U.S.-Partner Country Relations: Proposed projects should receive positive assessments by USIA's geographic area desk and overseas officers of program need, potential impact, and significance in the partner country(ies).

APPLICATION SUBMISSION

The complete application, including the original and 14 copies, should arrive at USIA NO LATER than 5:00 p.m. Washington, D.C. time on November 30, 1994. Send the material to:

U.S. Information Agency

Ref: E/P 95-16

Office of Grants Management, E/XE, Room 336

301 Fourth Street, S.W.

Washington, D.C. 20547

For further information on the proposal for the program, or questions regarding the guidelines, call Ruth Fair Leeb at (202) 619-5326, E/PN; Facsimile: (202) 619-4350; internet address: rleeb@usia.gov