He who receives an idea from me receives instruction himself without lessening mine; as he who lights his taper at mind, receives light without darkening me. - Thomas Jefferson
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 217, Part I, 8 November 1999


___________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 217, Part I, 8 November 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern
Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by the
staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part I, a compilation of news concerning Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia. Part II covers Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document.  Back issues of
RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at
RFE/RL's Web site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part I

* RUSSIAN MILITARY DENY SCHISM OVER CHECHEN WAR

* OVR RELEASES PARTY PLATFORM

* TAJIK PRESIDENT RE-ELECTED

End Note: RUSSIAN ECONOMY IMPROVING WHILE MOSCOW REMAINS
STUBBORN
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

RUSSIA

RUSSIAN MILITARY DENY SCHISM OVER CHECHEN WAR. In a joint
statement released in Moscow on 6 November, Defense Minister
Igor Sergeev and Chief of General Staff Anatolii Kvashnin
rejected as "lies, slander, and misinformation" Russian media
reports that some senior generals have threatened to resign
to protest plans by the presidential administration to begin
peace talks in Chechnya. The previous day, Kvashnin's first
deputy, Colonel-General Valerii Manilov, had said that he is
confident that the Russian military and civilian leadership
will act in tandem and that the military operation will
continue until "terrorists" and "bandits" on Chechen
territory are wiped out. But the next day, the commander of
the western Chechen front, Major-General Vladimir Shamanov,
again affirmed in an interview with Russian state television
that he will resign if ordered to halt his troops' advance in
Chechnya (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 5 November 1999). LF

CHECHEN PRESIDENT APPEALS TO CLINTON, UN... Aslan Maskhadov
has written to U.S. President Bill Clinton to ask the U.S. to
"use its influence as a defender of the rights...of peoples"
to stop "the genocide of the Chechen people," Reuters and
Interfax reported on 7 November. Maskhadov said in that
missive that Moscow launched the war in Chechnya to deflect
attention from internal problems within the Russian
leadership. That move, he said, was in violation of the May
1997 bilateral agreement, in which Moscow pledged not to use
force against Chechnya. Maskhadov has also sent a similar
appeal to the UN and has written to the leaders of states
that will attend the OSCE Istanbul summit in 18-19 November
to ask them to raise the Chechen issue at that forum. LF

...EXPRESSES READINESS FOR PEACE TALKS. On 6 November,
Chechen Premier Kazbek Makhashev quoted Maskhadov as saying
at a cabinet session that he is ready for "any form of
negotiations" to stop the war and the death of civilians"
Interfax reported. Maskhadov added that his North Caucasus
colleagues could contribute to resolving the crisis. But the
"Frankfurter Rundschau" on 4 November quoted Ingushetia's
President Ruslan Aushev as saying that the Russian Defense
Ministry sabotaged a meeting between Maskhadov and other
North Caucasus leaders scheduled for late October by refusing
to guarantee Makhsadov's safe transit to Yessentuki, in
Stavropol Krai, where that meeting was to take place.
Speaking in Moscow on 5 November, Russian First Deputy Chief
of General Staff Colonel-General Manilov said Maskhadov must
first distance himself from "terrorists" such as Basaev and
Khattab before any peace talks can begin, ITAR-TASS and
Interfax reported. LF

RUSSIA RESUMES BOMBING OF GROZNY. Russian aircraft and
artillery subjected Grozny and other Chechen towns, including
Bamut, Gudermes, Urus-Martan, and Gekhi, to intensive bombing
and artillery attack on 6- 7 November. Chechen spokesmen said
that 38 civilians were killed and more than 100 injured in
Grozny, while Reuters reported that four died in Gekhi.
Chechen field commander Shamil Basaev said on 6 November that
few Chechen fighters have been hit by the bombing, but other
Chechen military sources told Reuters the following day that
they have withdrawn from Bamut, west of Grozny, and 28 of
their men were killed and 26 wounded in heavy fighting in the
villages of Samashki, Alkhan-kala, and Zakan-Yurt. In Mozdok,
a spokesman for the Russian military command told Interfax on
5 November that Russian troops control approximately 40
percent of Chechnya. LF

SHOIGU PLANS TO SEND DISPLACED PERSONS BACK TO CHECHNYA.
Russia's Minister for Emergency Situations Sergei Shoigu told
journalists in Moscow on 6 November that a list is shortly to
be made public of 17 localities in the Russian-controlled
districts of Chechnya to which displaced persons may return
from Ingushetia and North Ossetia, ITAR-TASS reported. Shoigu
added that there is a reserve of tents, bedding, and
equipment to house 30,000 people in those localities, and
that the Russian authorities will guarantee the safety of
those who choose to return. The previous day, Russian
Interior Minister Vladimir Rushailo had said that the "main
task" of Russian federal agencies in the "liberated"
districts of Chechnya is to create a "normal standard of
living" for the Chechen population there. Despite such
assurances, another 4,000 civilians crossed the border from
Chechnya into Ingushetia on 6 November, raising the number of
displaced persons to more than 199,000, according to
Interfax. LF

FORMER GROZNY MAYOR PARDONED... President Boris Yeltsin has
pardoned former Grozny mayor Beslan Gantemirov, who was
sentenced in 1998 to six years' imprisonment on charges of
having embezzled 54 billion undenominated rubles allocated to
Chechnya from the state budget for reconstruction, Caucasus
Press reported. Gantemirov is a former commander of the late
Djokhar Dudaev's bodyguards. He split with Dudaev in 1993 and
joined the domestic Chechen opposition. He has repeatedly
claimed that the charges against him were fabricated to
protect senior Russian officials. In a lengthy interview
published in "Nezavisimaya gazeta" last December, Gantemirov
said he believes that at some stage he will be in a position
again "to serve Chechnya" (see "RFE/RL Caucasus Report," Vol.
1, No. 43, 23 December 1998). LF

...AND IS IN LINE FOR LEADING POSITION? Malik Saidullaev, who
heads the pro-Moscow Chechen State Council, told Interfax on
5 November that he considers Gantemirov "a most acceptable
figure" for the post of Chechen premier. "An energetic and
courageous person must hold the post of the prime minister
and restore order in the republic," Saidullaev said. He added
that he considers Gantemirov was made "a scapegoat."
Gantemirov might be named premier at a congress of the
Chechen diaspora to be held in Moscow on 12 November,
according to ITAR-TASS. LF

OVR RELEASES PARTY PLATFORM. The Fatherland-All Russia
alliance released its election manifesto on 5 November. The
alliance, which is headed by former Prime Minister Yevgenii
Primakov, declared its goals as promoting a strong
government, socially oriented market reform, the crackdown on
crime, and powerful armed forces, according to Interfax. More
specifically, according to "Kommersant-Daily" on 6 November,
the group calls for lowering taxes and freezing rents and
gasoline prices. The daily, which is controlled by business
magnate Boris Berezovskii, a prominent foe of OVR, concluded
that the party's economic policy promises to be "no more
destructive than the November theses of [Soviet leader]
Vladimir Illyich [Lenin]." However, Mikhail Dmitriev of the
Carnegie Moscow Center suggested recently that all major
parties appear to have more realistic tax policies than was
the case during the last State Duma election. Those parties
believe that a priority of economic reform should be reducing
some of the tax burden on producers at the expense of
consumers. JAC

INVESTIGATORS DROP BEREZOVSKII CASE... An investigator at the
Prosecutor-General's Office, Nikolai Volkov, announced on 5
November that his office has dropped the criminal
investigation" into business magnate Berezovskii on charges
of money laundering and "illegal entrepreneurship." The
investigation of two former executives of Aeroflot, Nikolai
Glushkov and Boris Krasnenker, will continue, Volkov said.
Suspended Prosecutor-General Yurii Skuratov told "The Moscow
Times" the next day that he was aware of "pressure applied to
Volkov" by Berezovskii. Volkov denied that either the
instigation of charges against Berezovskii or the subsequent
dropping of those charges was politically motivated. JAC

...AS BEREZOVSKII DUBS PUTIN PRESIDENTIAL SUCCESSOR.
Berezovskii told reporters on 6 November that Prime Minister
Putin "is better than the other candidates on today's
political market." He added that Yeltsin's successor must be
strong-willed and that Putin is the most suitable person from
that point of view. In an interview with "Kommersant-Daily"
the same day, Putin rejected some media outlets' attempts to
portray him exclusively as a law-enforcement official. He
noted that he also spends a significant amount of time on
economy policy (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 5 November 1999). Also
on 6 November, Russian newspapers continued to speculate on
Putin's possible dismissal, with "Izvestiya" suggesting that
Emergencies Minister Shoigu or Interior Minister Vladimir
Rushailo might replace him. JAC

COMMUNISTS GATHER TO REMEMBER REVOLUTION. The 82nd
anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution on 7 November drew
crowds across Russia, the largest of which appeared to be in
St. Petersburg. Around 18,000 people marched down that city's
Nevskii Prospekt to Dvortsovoi Square and sang the
"Internationale," Interfax reported. In Moscow, according to
that agency, some 5,000-7,000 people gathered to hear
Communist Party leader Gennadii Zyuganov and others on the
square located opposite the former KGB headquarters. The
western city of Belgorod and the industrial Urals city of
Chelyabinsk also attracted crowds of 5,000 and 4,000,
respectively, ITAR-TASS reported. Attendance was thinner in
the Far Northern cities of Murmansk and Petrozavodsk, where
about 500 turned out. Also on 7 November, Western agencies
reported that the granddaughter of former Soviet leader Iosif
Stalin, Nadezhda Stalin, died. Stalin's second wife, who was
her grandmother, also died on 7 November. JAC

HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES EXPLORE NEW AREAS. Human rights
activists in Ufa, the capital of the Bashkortostan Republic,
filed a lawsuit in a Moscow district court saying that the
rights of Russian television viewers are being violated,
"Kommersant-Daily" reported on 5 November. Those activists
claim that television commercials on Russian Public
Television, Russian Television, and NTV account for 30-50
percent of air time, compared with the world average of only
10-13 percent. The district court has refused to hear the
case and referred it to a municipal court. If rejected there,
the activists plan to take the case to the European Court of
Human Rights. Meanwhile in Ulan Ude, the capital of the
Republic of Buryatia, a human rights center succeeded in
arranging for a telephone to be installed in the home of
local resident Ivan Tabituev, according to "Izvestiya" on 6
November. Tabituev first applied for a phone in 1965. JAC

GERMANY URGES RUSSIA, NATO TO REPAIR RELATIONS. Speaking two
days before the 10th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin
wall, German Ambassador to Moscow Ernst-Joerg von Studnitz
urged Russia and NATO to seek to improve their relations. The
ambassador told Interfax on 7 November that if one side
refuses to do so, the situation in the world "may become
complicated again." "We have tried to make relations between
the West and Russia move for the better but have been unable
to make this come true so far," the agency quoted him as
saying. JC

BALLOT ORDER READIED FOR DUMA ELECTIONS. Representatives of
28 movements or blocs drew lots on 5 November to determine
the order in which their groups will appear on the ballot for
the 19 December State Duma elections. The small Conservative
Party of Russia drew the top spot, followed by Duma Deputy
Sergei Baburin's Russian All-People's Union and Women of
Russia. None of these parties is expected to attract enough
votes to overcome the 5 percent barrier for entry to the
Duma. Of the major parties, Yabloko is listed sixth, Unity
14th, OVR 19th, the Communist Party 20th, and Our Home Is
Russia 25th. JAC

U.S. EMBASSY'S Y2K PLANS CRITICIZED. "The New York Times"
reported on 8 November that "although the State Department is
planning to withdraw hundreds of government employees and
their families from Russia and other former Soviet republics
before 1 January, experts at the U.S. embassy in Moscow have
concluded there is virtually no risk to diplomats from the
year 2000 computer problem." The daily also reports that the
estimated cost to the U.S. government is $5,000 per person
for 15 days of leave and that estimates for the total cost of
withdrawing personnel range from $8-$1.25 million. The
newspaper noted that "the U.S. is spending $7.5 million this
year under its program to create civilian jobs for scientists
in Russia's closed nuclear cities." Interfax reported on 5
November that the U.S. appears to be the only leading Western
country considering changes to the operation of its embassy
in Russia during the millennium transition. JAC

TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

ARMENIAN PRESIDENT IN MOSCOW. Robert Kocharian met with Prime
Minister Vladimir Putin and Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov
Moscow on 5 November. Kocharian also had what ITAR-TASS
described as a "very warm and cordial" meeting with Russian
President Boris Yeltsin at the latter's Ogarevo residence, at
which Kocharian expressed thanks for Russia's expressions of
support following the killings of eight senior Armenian
officials in late October. The talks focused on bilateral
relations and the prospects for resolving the Karabakh
conflict. Armenian Foreign Minister Vartan Oskanian and
Defense Minister Vagharshak Harutiunian, who accompanied the
Armenian president, held meetings with their Russian
counterparts. LF

NEW SUSPECT DETAINED IN ARMENIAN PARLIAMENT SHOOTINGS.
Armenian parliamentary deputy Mushegh Movsisian was detained
for questioning on 4 November in connection with the 27
October shootings in the Armenian parliament, RFE/RL's
Yerevan bureau reported on 6 November. On 5 November,
opposition parliamentary deputy Arshak Sadoyan told RFE/RL
that legislators will propose creating an ad hoc committee to
conduct an independent investigation into the killings and
deliver a "political assessment." Also on 5 November,
replacements were named for five of the slain Miasnutyun
deputies who were elected to the parliament on the bloc's
party list in the 31 May poll. LF

AKSENENKO DISCUSSES CHECHNYA, VISAS WITH AZERBIJANI
PRESIDENT... Russian First Deputy Prime Minister Nikolai
Aksenenko and Energy Minister Viktor Kalyuzhnyi met with
senior Azerbaijani officials in Baku on 5 November. President
Heidar Aliev told Aksenenko that Azerbaijan condemns
terrorism and regards the fighting in Chechnya as Russia's
internal affair, according top Interfax. But Aliev also
denied that arms and mercenaries are entering Chechnya via
Azerbaijani territory. He said the proposed introduction of
visas for Azerbaijanis wishing to enter Russia will aggravate
the situation on Azerbaijan's border with the Russian
Federation as the large Lezgin, Dargin, and Avar minorities
are divided between the two countries. Aliev added that
according to the Bishkek agreement on visa-free travel
between CIS states, Azerbaijan should be notified 90 days in
advance of the introduction of a visa requirement. LF

...FAILS TO PERSUADE AZERBAIJAN TO SHIP MORE OIL VIA RUSSIA.
Meeting with Natik Aliev, president of Azerbaijan's state oil
company SOCAR, Aksenenko failed to persuade the oil chief
that it would be advantageous for Azerbaijan to agree to
export oil via the northern pipeline bypassing Chechnya,
which is scheduled for completion by mid-2000, rather than to
continue lobbying for construction of the planned Baku-Ceyhan
export pipeline. (Turkey, Azerbaijan, and Georgia are
scheduled to sign a framework legal agreement on that project
at the upcoming OSCE Istanbul summit, and Georgian President
Eduard Shevardnadze discussed the project with his Turkish
counterpart, Suleyman Demirel, in a telephone conversation on
6 November, ITAR-TASS reported.) Kalyuzhnyi offered to allow
Azerbaijan to increase from 5 million tons to 12-15 million
tons the amount of oil it exports annually via Russia. But
SOCAR President Aliev said his company will abide by its
agreement to export 5 million tons annually until 2003,
according to ITAR-TASS. LF

GEORGIA AGAIN CONDEMNS RUSSIAN VISA REQUIREMENT. Speaking on
Georgian state television, Minister of State Vazha
Lortkipanidze said Russia's plans to introduce visas for
Georgian citizens wishing to enter Russia is aimed at drawing
Georgia into the conflict in the North Caucasus, Caucasus
Press reported on 6 November. The previous day, Georgian
Ambassador to Moscow Malkhaz Kakabadze said Russia proposed
introducing those visas as of 1 January. Kakabadze added that
Georgia sees no reason for the visa requirement but will
begin talks with Moscow on its implementation. Of the 2,202
Russians who took part in a recent poll, the overwhelming
majority (2,048) expressed support for the introduction of
visas for citizens of Georgia and Azerbaijan entering the
Russian Federation, according to "Segodnya" on 5 November. LF

THIRD PARTY QUALIFIES FOR REPRESENTATION IN GEORGIAN
PARLIAMENT. Georgian Central Electoral Commission officials
on 7 November announced updated results of the party-list
vote in the 31 October parliamentary elections, Caucasus
Press reported. According to those data, three parties will
be represented in the new parliament. The Union of Citizens
of Georgia will retain its absolute majority, having polled
41.85 percent of the party list vote to receive 85 of the 150
seats allocated under the proportional system. The Union for
the Democratic Revival of Georgia polled 25.65 percent (51
seats) and the bloc Industry Will Save Georgia 7.8 percent
(14 seats). LF

KAZAKHSTAN'S PARLIAMENT PASSES DRAFT BUDGET FOR 2000. A joint
session of both chambers of Kazakhstan's parliament passed
next year's budget in the second and final reading on 5
November, Interfax reported. The budget provides for
expenditures of 404.8 billion tenge ($276 million) and
revenues of 340.3 billion tenge, the deficit being equal to 3
percent of GDP. Passage of the budget removes the final
obstacle to a new three-year IMF loan program. Prime Minister
Qasymzhomart Toqaev thanked parliamentary deputies for their
"realism" in endorsing the draft, adding that it might have
to be amended to meet social requirements. But "Nezavisimaya
gazeta" predicted on 4 November that the IMF demand for more
effective tax collection will drive many Kazakh industrial
enterprises to bankruptcy. LF

ARCHIVES OF HUMAN RIGHTS BUREAU IN KAZAKHSTAN DESTROYED BY
FIRE. Records dating back six years were destroyed by fire at
the Human Rights and Legality Bureau in Almaty on 4 November,
RFE/RL's bureau in the former capital reported on 8 November,
quoting the bureau's director, Yevgenii Zhovtis. The cause of
the blaze is unclear. LF

KAZAKHSTAN'S FOREIGN MINISTER WARNS AGAINST ISLAMIC THREAT.
Speaking in Moscow on 6 November, Yerlan Idrisov said that
Kazakh security forces have launched an operation against
"foreign bandit formations" that infiltrated southern
Kazakhstan from neighboring Uzbekistan, AP reported. Three
days earlier, a Kazakh Interior Ministry press secretary in
Astana denied that unidentified gunmen crossed into
Kazakhstan from neighboring Uzbekistan (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 4 November 1999). LF

TAJIK PRESIDENT RE-ELECTED... Imomali Rakhmonov polled 96
percent of the vote in the 6 November presidential poll, in
which 98 percent of the country's 2.8 million electorate
participated, Reuters reported on 7 November, quoting Central
Electoral Commission spokesman Davlatali Davlatov. Russian
and CIS observers said they registered no violations of
voting procedure. The OSCE did not send election observers,
saying that democratic conditions had not been created for
the vote. LF

...AFTER TAJIK OPPOSITION WITHDRAWS BOYCOTT. Hours before
polling stations opened on 6 November, United Tajik
Opposition (UTO) leader Said Abdullo Nuri lifted the
opposition boycott on the poll in return for the release from
prison of 93 Tajik fighters and for unspecified concessions
related to the conduct of the parliamentary elections
scheduled for February 2000, Reuters and AP reported.
Affirming that "peace and reconciliation are more important
than personal ambition," Nuri also agreed that the UTO will
resume its participation in the work of the Commission for
National Reconciliation. The opposition had withdrawn from
that body and declared a boycott of the elections to protest
restrictions on the participation of opposition candidates in
the presidential poll. LF

TAJIK OPPOSITION FIGURE CLAIMS POLL WAS RIGGED. Davlat Usmon
of the Islamic Renaissance Party, which forms the backbone of
the UTO, told journalists in Dushanbe on 7 November that he
believes the outcome of the poll was rigged and that only 20-
30 percent of voters had participated. A minimum turnout of
50 percent is required for the poll to be valid. Usmon said
he will call for the poll to be annulled. Usmon had been
registered as a candidate by the Central Electoral
Commission, despite having failed to collect the required
145,000 signatures in his support, and insists that his
registration was illegal According to official returns, Usmon
garnered just 2 percent of the vote, losing even in the
Karategin valley in eastern Tajikistan where support for the
Islamic Renaissance Party is traditionally strong, according
to ITAR-TASS. LF

UZBEK GUERRILLAS WITHDRAW FROM TAJIKISTAN. Some 450 Uzbek
Islamic militants who had seized a dozen hostages in southern
Kyrgyzstan in August left Tajik territory on 5-6 November,
together with some 100 Uzbek civilians, ITAR-TASS reported on
6 November. The militants belong to a group headed by Djuma
Namangani, who had promised during talks on 4 November with
UTO leader Nuri to withdraw from Tajikistan to Uzbekistan.
Tajikistan's Minister for Emergency Situations Mirzo Zieyev,
a former UTO commander who helped negotiate the release of
the hostages seized in Kyrgyzstan, monitored the Uzbek
withdrawal. According to him, the withdrawal proceeded
without incident, according to ITAR-TASS. LF

END NOTE

RUSSIAN ECONOMY IMPROVING WHILE MOSCOW REMAINS STUBBORN

by Sophie Lambroschini

	The IMF delegation arriving in Moscow on 8 November will
seek to determine the extent of Russia's progress in making
its financial transactions easily traceable or what
economists call "transparent."
	The world lending institution has set conditions that
Russia must meet in order to receive the second installment,
worth $640 million, of a $4.5 billion loan. The IMF released
the first installment in July, but the second one was frozen
in September after several financial scandals suggested
possible misuse of previous loans.
	The conditions include tighter spending policy, regular
audits of the Russian Central Bank's dealings with its
affiliated structures in other countries, an audit of the
Russian Savings Bank, and the adoption of international
accounting standards.
	According to Russian media reports, Russian authorities
have balked at these new conditions. Aleksandr Livshits, the
Russian minister responsible for relations with international
financial organizations, complained last month that the West
is imposing higher standards of transparency on Russia than
it is applying to itself.
	Russia's relations with the fund have been increasingly
strained over the past several months amid allegations that
the country has misused earlier loans and increased its
military budget to finance the war in Chechnya.
	But Russian authorities express optimism that they will
receive the installment. And they also express a stiff-necked
determination to continue their economic policies, despite
IMF criticism.
	Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin announced at a
cabinet meeting last week that positive economic trends are
continuing: GDP growth totaled 1.8 percent in the third
quarter of 1999, inflation is under control, and tax revenues
are higher than expected. All these indicators are plus
points for a country struggling to emerge from the economic
crisis of 1998.
	John Paul Smith is a London-based expert in emerging
markets with the investment firm Morgan Stanley. In a
presentation to investors last week, he was guardedly
optimistic about the Russian economy, saying "there is a
clear potential for a shift to more positive factors." He
noted that the economic situation is better than anyone could
have predicted.
	Smith attributed this to a pick-up in industrial
production and the rise in global oil prices. He added that
there has been an improvement in the fiscal situation owing
to small-scale reform in collecting taxes.
	Smith warned, however, that Russian policymakers should
not interpret this improvement as the start of an overall
economic regeneration. He said the rise in industrial
production is mainly owing to the devaluation of the ruble
and the resulting cheapness of Russian goods on world
markets.
	Smith also noted that Russia should build on the
benefits of the devaluation by implementing further economic
reforms. He warned that if the federal government increases
expenditures too much, these advantages might be squandered.
	This is precisely what the IMF is worried about. A tough
budgetary policy was one of the IMF's conditions for
releasing the loan installment. But budgetary restraint is
one of Russia's main "little sins," as the finance minister
puts it.
	Last month, Russia increased its military budget to fund
the war in Chechnya, triggering complaints from the IMF.
Russia argued that the Chechen war is being financed by the
extra revenues collected. And this month, the State Duma
approved an extra $6 billion rubles on spending. The
government said it has to accept the increase to get the
budget past the leftist-dominated Duma.
	So far, these explanations have not convinced the IMF.
Russian officials are suspecting the West of using financial
blackmail to force Moscow to compromise on Chechnya. Putin,
for his part, has said that Russia will not sacrifice its
national interests for what he called "financial lollipops."
	Unified Energy Systems head Anatolii Chubais, who is
also a former prime minister and former Russian contact
person for the international financial organizations, has
tried to defuse these tensions.
	"In the list of conditions it is not written that the
Bank of New York will not work with Russian importers," he
commented at a press conference in Moscow last week. 'In the
list of conditions it does not say that Russia should not
fight terrorism in Chechnya. I am categorically against
pulling the IMF into semi-political decisions on that
[issue]. If this does not happen, if the IMF fulfills its
obligations, if Russia fulfills its obligations in regard to
its interest, then there is a real chance of solving the
problem [of releasing the second loan installment] by early
December.
	But even if the second installment of the loan is
released, it will not provide Russia with any cash. The loan
would be used exclusively to repay Russia's debt to the fund,
bypassing Russian institutions completely and ending up back
in IMF coffers.

The author is an RFE/RL correspondent based in Moscow.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1999 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
hermanoval@rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 25 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour LIVE
Broadcast Studio. http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble via
email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Fabian Schmidt, SchmidtF@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Asta Banionis, Pete Baumgartner, Victor Gomez, Mel Huang,
Dan Ionescu, Jolyon Naegele, Matyas Szabo, Anthony
Wesolowsky, Martins J. Zvaners, Mato Zsolt-Istvan

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole