The trouble with being punctual is that nobody's there to appreciate it. - Franklin P. Jones
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 216, Part II, 5 November 1999


___________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 216, Part II, 5 November 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern
Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by the
staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe. Part I covers Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document. Back issues of RFE/RL
Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at RFE/RL's Web
site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part II

* UKRAINE'S MOROZ, VITRENKO SUPPORT SYMONENKO AGAINST KUCHMA?

* U.S., EU TO COORDINATE APPROACH TO YUGOSLAVIA

* POLL: MOST CROATS SAY TUDJMAN SHOULD RESIGN FOR HEALTH
REASONS

End Note: RADIO LIBERTY'S PETER DORNAN
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

IMF MISSION URGES BELARUS TO TAKE MORE LIBERAL STEPS. An IMF
mission headed by Thomas Wolf has concluded a two-week stay
in Belarus to assess that country's economic prospects,
RFE/RL's Belarusian Service reported on 4 November. In
particular, the mission examined the government's plan to
liberalize its monetary policy in 2000. While praising the
government's intent, Wolf told journalists that Belarus
should "go further" in liberalizing its hard currency market
and prices as well as expanding privatization and launching
agricultural reform. The IMF has not commented on Belarusian
President Alyaksandr Lukashenka's remark in the Russian State
Duma last week that Russia's economic woes result from the
country's cooperation with "those crooks from the IMF." JM

UKRAINE'S MOROZ, VITRENKO SUPPORT SYMONENKO AGAINST KUCHMA?
Ukraine's Central Electoral Commission officially confirmed
on 4 November that President Leonid Kuchma and Communist
Party leader Petro Symonenko will face each other in the 14
November presidential runoff. According to official results
of the 31 October first round, Kuchma won 36.49 percent of
the vote, Symonenko 22.24 percent, Oleksandr Moroz 11.29
percent, Natalya Vitrenko 10.97 percent, and Yevhen Marchuk
8.13 percent. Turnout was 70.15 percent. Moroz declared that
he and "most" of his supporters will vote for Symonenko in
the runoff but warned that a "large part" of his electorate
will "vote against" both Kuchma and Symonenko. Vitrenko said
she will back Symonenko if he offers her the post of premier
in a future cabinet. Meanwhile, Interfax reported that other
candidates in the elections--Oleksandr Tkachenko, Volodymyr
Oliynyk, Mykola Haber, Oleksandr Bazylyuk, and Yuriy
Karmazin--have also decided to support Symonenko against
Kuchma. JM

KUCHMA TO STRIKE ELECTION DEAL WITH MARCHUK? Kuchma said on 4
November that a dialogue with Marchuk about their
"cooperation" in the 14 November runoff is "possible,"
Interfax reported. "Marchuk has to make up his mind," Kuchma
added, noting that "talks with some of the former
presidential candidates are under way and the results will be
known shortly." Meanwhile, Mykhaylo Pohrebynskyy, head of the
Kyiv-based Center for Political Research, told journalists on
4 November that Symonenko could beat Kuchma if the turnout in
the second round is low. "If only 35 percent of the
electorate turns out, then Symonenko will be president,"
Pohrebynskyy said, adding that "Kuchma's problem is to
convince voters that Symonenko could win." JM

UKRAINE URGES RIGHT TO EU MEMBERSHIP. First Deputy Foreign
Minister Yevhen Bersheda urged the EU on 4 November to make a
clear pledge that Ukraine has the right to become a member of
the union, Reuters reported. It is expected that at the
Helsinki summit on 10-11 December, EU leaders will unveil a
new strategy for Ukraine, similar to that drawn up for Russia
earlier this year. Bersheda said Ukraine wants the strategy
to make clear that the country has a future in the EU once
Kyiv meets the union's economic and political conditions for
prospective members. Bersheda added that the first round of
the presidential elections in Ukraine proved that Ukrainians
want to move toward the West rather than turn back toward
Russia. JM

TALLINN ELECTS MOIS AS MAYOR. The Tallinn City Council on 4
November elected Interior Minister Juri Mois of the Pro
Patria union as mayor of Tallinn. Mois gained 33 votes in the
64-member Council in a second vote, having won only 32 in the
first vote, just short of the necessary majority. The
opposition voiced anger at the re-vote, and Siiri Oviir of
the Center Party called it a "legal infringement" on the
rules of electing a mayor and promised to "definitely
challenge this in court," "Eesti Paevaleht" reported. The
Reform Party's Rein Voog was elected as City Council chairman
on 28 October, thanks to the defection of an opposition
member, giving the four-party coalition a majority of 33
seats (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 29 October 1999). MH

LATVIAN PARLIAMENT PASSES AMENDMENTS AHEAD OF REFERENDUM.
Lawmakers on 4 November passed amendments to the law on
pensions, despite the fact that an earlier version of the
bill will be put to a referendum on 13 November (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 13 October 1999). Most of the opposition walked
out of the vote, BNS reported. The new amendments would slow
down the rise in the official retirement age and lift some
financial restrictions on working pensioners. Opposition
lawmakers said the passage of the amendments causes a
constitutional crisis, as it replaces a law blocked pending a
referendum. They noted that they will challenge the
amendments in court. MH

LITHUANIAN NUCLEAR REGULATORS REFUTE RUMOURS OF 'INCIDENT.'
The Lithuanian nuclear safety regulator VATESI has dismissed
rumors of a recent "incident" at the Ignalina Nuclear Power
Plant, ELTA reported. Ignalina director Viktor Shevaldin said
no "incidents" surpassing the INES rating of zero have
occurred at Ignalina for a long time, according to BNS. ELTA
noted that the German television station RTL reported the
possible incident on 3 November. Currently both reactors at
Ignalina are working to full capacity. MH

LITHUANIA NOT TO HOLD REFERENDUM? Opposition lawmakers' bid
to hold a referendum over the sale of Mazeikiai Oil to
Williams International (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 26 October
1999) may be in jeopardy after a chief supporter of such a
vote withdrew his support. Saulius Peceliunas said he
originally signed the petition calling for a referendum in
order to pressure the government for better conditions from
Williams; later, however, he recognized that it is too late
and that the costs of the referendum will be high, ELTA
reported. Lithuanian laws state that a referendum may be
called when more than one-third of total members of the
parliament, or 48 members out of 141, sign a petition. The
withdrawal of Peceliunas would lower the number of signatures
to 47. However, referendum supporters are questioning whether
the actual number of lawmakers is currently 138, as three
seats have been declared vacant for the remainder of the
legislative term. MH

POLISH COALITION STILL UNDECIDED ABOUT TAX REFORM. Finance
Minister Leszek Balcerowicz of the Freedom Union (UW) caused
the zloty exchange rate to plunge when he threatened on 3
November to quit the cabinet if the UW's coalition partner,
the Solidarity Electoral Action (AWS), does not accept his
tax-cutting proposal (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 3 November
1999). Polish Radio reported the following day that
Balcerowicz termed the AWS's proposal on individual income
tax brackets as "sufficiently close" to his own and
"supportable." However, a UW-AWS expert commission has not
yet agreed on a final tax bill to be submitted to the
parliament. The zloty exchange rate fell to an all-time low
of 4.35 to $1 on 4 November. JM

POLAND, CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY SUPPORT SLOVAKIA'S NATO BID.
Janusz Onyszkiewicz, Vladimir Vetchy, and Janos Szabo, the
defense ministers of Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary,
respectively, pledged at their 3-4 November meeting in Poland
to assist Slovakia in its efforts to integrate into NATO, PAP
reported. According to CTK, the ministers also discussed
cooperation in modernizing their countries' forces and combat
equipment. JM

EU COMMISSIONER CRITICIZES CZECH WALL. Speaking in The Hague
on 4 November, ahead of the 10th anniversary of the fall of
the Berlin Wall, EU commissioner in charge of enlargement
Guenter Verheugen said that now, when East and West are no
longer separated by an iron curtain whose symbol was the
Berlin wall, Europe wants "no more walls, neither between
East and West, nor inside countries, not in parts of a town,
and not on a single street," CTK reported. Verheugen
amplified this obvious allusion to the wall erected in Usti
nad Labem by saying that discrimination against Roma in
Eastern Europe is still strong and "represents one of the
many problems for the EU enlargement." MS

CZECH PARLIAMENT APPROVES INTRODUCING OMBUDSMAN. The Chamber
of Deputies on 4 November voted 101 to 70 to establish the
institution of ombudsman. The Senate must now vote on the
bill, CTK reported. The opposition Civic Democratic Party and
Freedom Union opposed the draft law, saying that citizens'
rights are already defended by regular courts and the
Constitutional Court. The bill stipulates that the
ombudsman's office is to be located in Brno, like the
Constitutional Court. It will have a staff of no more than 40
employees. The ombudsman will report cases of violation of
the law to the Chamber of Deputies and/or make them public.
MS

SLOVAK LABOR OFFICE ALSO MARKING ROMA WITH LETTER 'R.' Like
its Czech counterpart (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 27 October
1999), the Slovak National Labor Office (NUP) is marking the
files of unemployed Roma with the letter "R," NUP Director
General Jaroslav Sumny told CTK on 4 November. Sumny
emphasized that this does not signal discrimination. He said
that the letter is being used to point to what he called "a
risky group," explaining that a low level of education,
insufficient professional skills, and "complicated social
adaptability" characterizes that group. He said that if NUP
offices want to help them find jobs, they "must know
something about them." He also said this form of evidence
aids Slovakia to receive EU funds destined to help the Roma
population. MS

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

U.S., EU TO COORDINATE APPROACH TO YUGOSLAVIA. U.S. Secretary
of State Madeleine Albright and German Foreign Minister
Joschka Fischer agreed in Washington on 4 November that the
U.S. and the EU will coordinate their policies toward
Yugoslavia, Reuters reported. The two sides said U.S. and EU
officials will hold meetings in the coming weeks to work out
a coordinated strategy. While German officials said the
meetings will focus on deciding whether to lift the sanctions
on Yugoslavia before or after elections in Serbia, U.S.
officials said the meetings will focus merely on creating
"common objectives." Fischer stressed that the U.S. and
Germany see "eye to eye" on the need to remove Yugoslav
President Slobodan Milosevic from power. VG

EU OFFICIALS CALL FOR LIFTING OF SANCTIONS ON YUGOSLAVIA.
Various European officials have recently called for the
lifting of sanctions against Yugoslavia as a means of easing
the burden on average Serbs and supporting the opposition. On
3 November, Hans Koschnik, the German emissary to Bosnia-
Herzegovina, said the sanctions should be lifted and replaced
with "intensive cooperation" with the Serbian opposition,
"Die Woche" reported. Koschnik's call was supported by
officials in the Social Democratic and Christian Democratic
parties of Germany. On 4 November, French Foreign Minister
Hubert Vedrine sent a message to his EU colleagues in which
he called for gradual lifting of those sanctions that affect
average Serbs. At the same time, Vedrine said the sanctions
that "directly touch upon the leaders of the regime in
Belgrade" should be maintained and even tightened. VG

ALBRIGHT: U.S. HAS INTEREST IN MONTENEGRO'S SECURITY. U.S.
Secretary of State Albright on 4 November said the U.S. has
an "important interest" in the security of the Balkans,
"including that of Montenegro," Reuters reported. A senior
State Department official said the remark was a "carefully
worded" and "direct message" to the Belgrade leadership.
Albright also said the U.S. will seek new ways to offer
economic aid to Montenegro without propping up the regime in
Belgrade. On official suggested that the U.S. might allow
flights to and from Montenegro, but bypassing Serbia. VG

MONTENEGRIN PREMIER MEETS YUGOSLAV CHIEF OF STAFF. Filip
Vujanovic on 4 November said he met with Yugoslav Chief of
Staff Dragoljub Ojdanic in order to "establish an environment
in which any incident will be avoided," Reuters reported. The
meeting took place that day, despite Montenegrin President
Milo Djukanovic's pledge that he will hand over any war
criminal who happens to be on Montenegrin territory to the
Hague based war crimes tribunal. The tribunal indicted
Ojdanic for war crimes last May. Djukanovic said the arrest
of war criminals such as Ojdanic is "linked to a high degree
of risk, risk that the international community is cautioning
Montenegro not to take." In Washington, State Department
spokesman James Rubin expressed sympathy for Djukanovic's
position, indicating that the Montenegrin leader is not "free
to act" as he would like and that the U.S. believes his
intention to cooperate with the war crimes tribunal is
"genuine." VG

SERBIAN OFFICIALS SAY MONTENEGRO'S CURRENCY CHANGE A NATO
PLOT... Ivan Dacic, the spokesman for Milosevic's Socialist
Party, on 4 November described Montenegro's new currency
policy as a "move carried out by NATO which is using this
puppet creation only as a means to an end." Serbian Radical
Party head Vojislav Seselj said Montenegro's leadership is
heading for "all-out secession," which he called "a very
dangerous direction." Meanwhile, the National Bank of
Yugoslavia announced that it has halted transfers of funds to
firms in Montenegro from accounts of firms in Serbia. The
bank said it took the measure to prevent the "uncontrolled
issue of money in the territory of Montenegro," Beta
reported. VG

...REJECT U.S. PLEDGE TO LIFT SANCTIONS FOR ELECTIONS. Seselj
dismissed the recent U.S. pledge to lift most sanctions in
exchange for free and fair elections as an attempt by U.S.
Secretary of State Albright to ensure that "her bootlickers
will win" the vote. He described the strategy as "violence."
The official Yugoslav news agency Tanjug described the U.S.
offer as "new tactics and tricks" being prepared by the
Clinton administration. VG

POVERTY ON THE RISE IN YUG0SLAVIA. The UN's humanitarian
coordinator Steve Allen on 4 November said poverty has nearly
doubled in Yugoslavia over the past year. Allen said the
percentage of the population considered to be living in
poverty increased from 33 percent in July 1998 to 63 percent
in September 1999. The poverty level includes all people who
have a monthly income equivalent to $60 or less. The figures
do not include Kosova. Allen also noted that Yugoslavia's
national health insurance fund is on the verge of collapse.
VG

NEW ORGANIZATION PAYS FINE FOR SERBIAN EDITOR. An
organization calling itself Team 29 has paid the fine that
Cedomir Jovanovic received for violating the media law in
Yugoslavia (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 27 October 1999),
according to a Beta report monitored by the BBC. Jovanovic is
the editor of the opposition Alliance for Change's
publication "Promene." In a statement to the press, Team 29
pledged to "continue to assist in the struggle for a
democratic Serbia by the means which the regime of Slobodan
Milosevic allows." The Alliance for Change told Beta it is
not familiar with the new organization. VG

STUDIO-B SIGNS AGREEMENT WITH BANJA LUKA STATION. Belgrade's
independent Studio-B radio and television station has signed
an agreement with independent Banja Luka Radio-TV to share
news and cultural broadcasts, Studio-B reported on 4
November. Meanwhile, Studio-B director Dragan Kojadinovic
said some of his station's programs are still being jammed in
Serbia. VG

U.S. ASKS ISRAEL TO STOP BROADCASTING SERBIAN TV. The Israeli
Spacecom company, which operates the Amos-1 satellite, has
stopped allowing Serbian state television (RTS) to use its
satellite for broadcasting. That move comes after the U.S.
complained to Israel about the practice, AP reported. U.S.
Secretary of State Albright had asked Israeli Prime Minister
Ehud Barak at the recent Oslo summit to stop letting RTS use
the Israeli satellite for broadcasts, the newspaper "Yedioth
Ahronoth" reported. VG

PETRITSCH DISAPPOINTED WITH FAILURE TO SECURE BORDER
AGREEMENT. The international community's high representative
in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Wolfgang Petritsch, on 4 November said
he is disappointed over the failure of the joint presidency
of Bosnia to adopt a draft law on a multiethnic state border
service, Reuters reported. Bosnian Muslim President Alija
Izetbegovic said he supported the proposal but that his
Croatian and Serbian counterparts disagreed on how wide the
border under control of the state service should be. The
proposal called for the border belt to be 30 kilometers wide.
Last week, the head of the UN international police force in
Bosnia, Detlef Buwitt, said Petritsch will impose a law if
Bosnia fails to adopt one by December. VG

THREE PEOPLE SENTENCED IN MOSTAR CAR BOMB ATTACK. A Zenica
court handed down three foreign nationals prison sentences
ranging from five to eight years for their roles in planting
a car bomb that injured almost 50 people in Mostar in 1997,
ONASA reported on 3 November. The three men were also
sentenced to five years' expulsion from Bosnia following
their release. VG

DEL PONTE RAPS CROATIA FOR NOT COOPERATING WITH WAR CRIMES
TRIBUNAL. The chief prosecutor of the Hague-based war crimes
tribunal, Carla del Ponte, said on 4 November in Zagreb that
she is "very disappointed" that Croatia is not cooperating
fully with the tribunal. She was reacting to Croatia's
refusal to hand over documents regarding Zagreb's Flash and
Storm military operations in 1995. Del Ponte threatened to
"report Croatia's noncompliance" with the UN Security Council
unless it starts cooperating. Croatian Justice Minister
Zvonimir Separovic said Croatia believes the tribunal has no
jurisdiction over the operations, which he described as a
"legitimate liberation of our land." Del Ponte said she is
not questioning Croatia's right to carry out the operations.
She said the tribunal wants to investigate whether war crimes
were committed in the course of the operations, which sparked
a mass exodus of Serbs from Croatia. VG

POLL: MOST CROATS SAY TUDJMAN SHOULD RESIGN FOR HEALTH
REASONS. More than 60 percent of Croats say President Franjo
Tudjman should resign for health reasons, according to an
Media Metar poll cited by AP on 5 November. VG

OPPOSITION DEMONSTRATION HELD IN TIRANA. As Prime Minister
Ilir Meta's cabinet outlined its priorities in the parliament
on 4 November, some 3,000 demonstrators gathered in Tirana's
main square to demand new elections, AP reported. Opposition
Democratic Party leader Sali Berisha addressed the crowd,
saying "new elections are the only way out of the deep crisis
this country is in." In the parliament, Meta said the new
government will focus on fighting corruption, stabilizing the
country, and improving public order. The Democratic Party
boycotted the session. VG

ROMANIAN STUDENTS RENEW PROTESTS. Thousands of students again
took to the streets in Bucharest and other towns on 4
November to protest small grants and bad living conditions in
dormitories. Prime Minster Radu Vasile met with Daniel
Onisor, leader of the Students' League, and signed an
agreement stipulating that grants will be increased by 10
percent every month from January to May 2000 and by 50
percent in October 2000. But two student organizations from
Bucharest announced that the agreement does not meet their
minimum demands and that they will picket university
buildings and go on a strike as of 5 November, RFE/RL's
Bucharest bureau reported. MS

HISTORY TEXTBOOK SCANDAL TO BE DEBATED BY ROMANIAN
PARLIAMENT. Democratic Party and independent deputies joined
lawmakers from the nationalist Greater Romania Party and
Party of Romanian National Unity on 4 November to initiate a
motion for debate in the Chamber of Deputies of the dispute
over the "de-mythicized" history textbooks (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 13 October 1999). The 55 deputies said in their
motion that by allowing these optional textbooks to be used
in classrooms, the Education Ministry condones "the gross
affront of Romania's historical past, the trivialization,
marginalization, and falsification of historical truth" and
thereby risks "the danger of losing our national identity,"
Romanian radio reported. MS

MOLDOVAN PARLIAMENT AMENDS BUDGET. The parliament on 4
November approved the amendments to the 1999 budget that it
had rejected one week earlier, Infotag reported. The amended
budget increases the deficit from 383 to 583 million lei ($52
million) and proposes covering the shortfall by borrowing on
the international financial market, Infotag reported. Earlier
on 4 November, Prime Minister Ion Sturza told legislators
that they have 12 days to approve the amended budget and
government-proposed privatization laws. He said he and his
cabinet will resign if these changes are not approved. "The
government needs a vote of confidence or one of no
confidence. We are ready for any outcome," Reuters quoted him
as saying. MS

BULGARIAN PARLIAMENT MANDATES GOVERNMENT TO NEGOTIATE
KOZLODUY SHUTDOWN. The parliament on 4 November voted 146 to
68 with five abstentions to mandate the government to
negotiate the early closure of the Kozloduy nuclear plant.
The legislators said that the government must seek EU
compensation for the closure, AP reported. The same day,
Guenter Verheugen, EU commissioner in charge of expansion,
told Bulgarian Foreign Minister Nadezhda Mihailova in The
Hague that Sofia is in an "excellent position" to begin
accession talks with the EU, BTA reported. Verheugen said
Bulgaria "fully meets political criteria" for EU membership
and has started the process of economic reform. MS

BALKAN LEADERS URGE INVESTMENTS. Meeting in Borovets on 4
November, the presidents of Bulgaria, Romania, and Greece
urged the implementation of the Balkan Stability Pact,
proposing that various projects be financed by international
financial institutions. In a joint declaration, Petar
Stoyanov, Emil Constantinescu, and Kostas Simitis pledged
that "their countries will contribute to the substantiation
[sic] of the Stability Pact." Simitis said Greece intends to
mobilize over the next five years $500 million from the
private sector to finance transport, energy, and
telecommunication projects in the region, Reuters and AP
reported. The three leaders urged the EU to raise funds to
help remove from the River Danube debris from bridges bombed
by NATO earlier this year. MS

END NOTE

RADIO LIBERTY'S PETER DORNAN

By Mario Corti

	On All Saints Day (1 November), in Springfield in the
U.S. state of Pennsylvania, the former head of Radio
Liberty's Samizdat Unit, Peter Dornan, died of cancer at the
age of 76. He was the first editor of "Materialy Samizdata,"
a weekly Radio Liberty publication that became the biggest
collection of annotated documents on human rights violations
in the Soviet Union.
	"Materialy Samizdata," originally created for internal
use only, was soon made available to external subscribers. It
became the main source of information for scholars and
journalists interested in the subject of human rights
violations in the USSR. It was also a key source on Soviet
dissidents' struggle for their individual, political, social,
national, and cultural rights.
	Dornan joined Radio Liberty in 1956 as a research
analyst. He was instrumental in the creation of a samizdat
archive at Radio Liberty in 1968 and was its custodian until
1988, when he retired. He was also the author of the most
exhaustive study on Andrei Sakharov at the beginning of the
1970s (which was included in "Dissent in the USSR: Politics,
Ideology, and People," ed. Rudolf Tokes, Johns Hopkins
University Press). Thanks to Peter Dornan, samizdat documents
played a key role in Radio Liberty broadcasts.
	Indeed, it was thanks to samizdat and the efforts of
Dornan that Radio Liberty's broadcasts became a real
"domestic" service, broadcasting to the Soviet Union
documents about and authored by people living inside the
country.
	Dornan also acted as a talent scout for other
departments of Radio Liberty: it was on his initiative that
the current editor of "RFE/RL Newsline," who began her career
as a freelance translator of Georgian samizdat, was signed up
in 1980 by Radio Liberty Research.
	The samizdat archive, comprising more than 5,000
documents, is now housed at the Central European University
in Budapest. Dornan recently donated his personal archive to
the Drew University Library in the U.S. state of New Jersey.

Mario Corti is acting director of RFE/RL's Russian Service.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1999 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
listmanager@list.rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 25 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour LIVE
Broadcast Studio. http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble via
email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Fabian Schmidt, SchmidtF@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Asta Banionis, Pete Baumgartner, Victor Gomez, Mel Huang,
Dan Ionescu, Jolyon Naegele, Matyas Szabo, Anthony
Wesolowsky, Martins J. Zvaners, Mato Zsolt-Istvan

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole