Coleridge declares that a man cannot have a good conscience who refuses apple dumplings, and I confess that I am of the same opinion. - Charles Lamb
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 215, Part I, 4 November 1999


___________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 215, Part I, 4 November 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern
Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by the
staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part I, a compilation of news concerning Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia. Part II covers Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document.  Back issues of
RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at
RFE/RL's Web site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part I

* YELTSIN'S BACK

* MORE DISPLACED CHECHENS ALLOWED TO ENTER INGUSHETIA

* ARMENIAN PRESIDENT NAMES NEW PREMIER

End Note: WHEN 'SALVATION' IS DAMNATION
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

RUSSIA

YELTSIN'S BACK... President Boris Yeltsin's unexpected return
to Moscow on 3 November from a vacation in Sochi triggered
the usual speculation about whether a personnel reshuffle
should soon be expected. The website http://www.gazeta.ru
argues that Yeltsin will soon replace Prime Minister Vladimir
Putin with Emergencies Minister Sergei Shoigu. It notes that
Shoigu was recently recalled from his trip to the Far East
and Siberia to cope with the influx of Chechen displaced
persons into Ingushetia. "Nezavisimaya gazeta," which
receives funding from Boris Berezovskii's LogoVAZ group,
suggested Yeltsin may want to play a "more active" role in
the election process. On the other hand, "Izvestiya," which
is owned by Vladimir Potanin's Interros Group and LUKoil,
suggested that Yeltsin will not oust the premier since the
"Kremlin is holding onto Putin too tightly" to let him go
now. JAC

...AS PUTIN'S POPULARITY REPORTEDLY SOARS. According to a
recent survey conducted by the Public Opinion Foundation
among 1,500 people in 29 regions, 29 percent of Russians
would vote for Prime Minister Putin in presidential elections
if those elections were held on 6-7 November 1999, AP
reported. Foundation director Aleksandr Olson said the rating
exceeds the previous record, held by General Aleksandr Lebed
in 1996. According to AFP, the polling group VTsIOM will soon
release a survey also showing strong support for Putin.
Addressing a meeting of rectors of higher-education
institutions in Russia on 3 November, Putin suggested that
Russia needs a new national ideology based on patriotism,
Interfax reported. "One ideology was lost and nothing new was
suggested to replace it," Putin said. "Patriotism in the most
positive sense of this word" must be the backbone of the new
ideology. JAC

INFLATION TICKS DOWN, WHILE GASOLINE PRICES CONTINUE RISING.
Addressing cabinet members on 4 November, Putin said that the
country's macroeconomic indices for the current year are
"rather good," according to ITAR-TASS. Putin noted high
growth in industrial output, controlled inflation, and
increasing success collecting revenues for the budget,
Interfax reported. The same day, the Russian Statistics
Agency reported that inflation in October averaged 1.4
percent, compared with 1.5 percent in September, 1.2 percent
in August, and 2.8 percent in June. Prices of consumer goods
rose only 0.9 percent, but gasoline prices jumped 7.7 percent
in October. Some regions have witnessed sharper increases; in
Buryatia, for example, the price of various types of gasoline
rose 9-11 percent, "Nezavisimaya gazeta" reported on 4
November. Nationwide, the price of gasoline has increased 2.7
times since the beginning of the year. JAC

MORE DISPLACED CHECHENS ALLOWED TO ENTER INGUSHETIA. Some
1,300 fleeing Chechens were allowed across the border into
Ingushetia on 3 November, 10 times the number who crossed the
previous day, Reuters reported. Ingushetia's President Ruslan
Aushev again appealed to President Yeltsin and Prime Minister
Putin to ensure the normal functioning of the border
checkpoint, while an Ingush migration official told ITAR-TASS
that the delay in admitting the Chechens is due to the
complicated and time-consuming process of checking their
identification. Putin, for his part, ordered Minister for
Emergency Situations Shoigu to travel to Ingushetia and
evaluate the situation there. On 4 November, traffic at the
crossing point was moving far more swiftly after the
requirement that women and children fill out official papers
was suspended, Reuters reported. Ingushetia's border guard
commander said he hopes the estimated 50,000 Chechens still
waiting to enter Ingushetia will be able to do so by the end
of the day. LF

RUSSIAN DEFENSE MINISTER SAYS RUSSIA PLANS TO EXTEND CONTROL
THROUGHOUT CHECHNYA. Speaking on 3 November in Ferghana,
where he met with Central Asian colleagues to review joint
military exercises (see below), Igor Sergeev said that
Russian troops "are planning to free from terrorists not only
Grozny but the whole of Chechnya. This is the task set for us
by the president," ITAR-TASS reported. Sergeev predicted that
Russian forces will take control of the town of Gudermes
within days. He denied, however, that they will take Grozny
by storm. Sergeev also claimed that the Chechen fighters have
up to 70 Stinger anti-aircraft missiles, although he added
that "we are taking measures to reduce the supply" of those
weapons. Sergeev did not specify how those missiles are
transported to Chechnya. LF

RUSSIAN MILITARY CLAIMS CHECHENS RETREATING SOUTHWARD.
Chechen defenders are abandoning the towns of Gudermes and
Sunzha and retreating south into the mountains, where they
are setting up winter camps, Interfax and ITAR-TASS reported
on 3 November, quoting unnamed Russian military spokesmen.
The same day, Russian forces took control of the main highway
east from Gudermes to Daghestan, while Russian artillery
continued to shell Gudermes and the village of Berkat-Yurt
just east of Grozny. LF

NORTH CAUCASUS LEADERS AGAIN CALL ON MOSCOW TO BEGIN TALKS
WITH GROZNY. Adam Malsagov, who is an official Ingushetian
representative in Moscow, said on 4 November that Ingushetia,
Daghestan, and North Ossetia want the Russian leadership to
start negotiations immediately with unnamed "moderate"
Chechen leaders, as failure to begin such talks prolongs
hostilities and increases the number of casualties, Caucasus
Press reported. A meeting of North Caucasus leaders with
Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov planned for 28 October
failed to take place. LF

JUSTICE MINISTER SAYS TROOP DEPLOYMENT IN INGUSHETIA IS
LEGAL. Russian Deputy Minister of Justice Yevgenii Sidorenko
ruled on 3 November that the deployment of Russian troops in
Ingushetia is provided for by the law on terrorism, which
allows the use of the armed forces to combat a terrorist
threat, Interfax reported. Earlier that day, Ingushetia's
President Aushev had said that his republic's Ministry of
Justice was trying to determine whether the actions of
federal forces in Ingushetia are legal. Sidorenko denied that
the Ingushetian Justice Ministry has the authority to
challenge the legitimacy of the Russian Defense Ministry's
actions. LF

YELTSIN REWARDS SERGEEV AND CO? Reports are circulating that
President Yeltsin has conferred the Hero of Russia award on
Defense Minister Sergeev. "Nezavisimaya gazeta" on 3 November
quoted a source at the Defense Ministry's press service as
saying that such information is "highly plausible" and that
the title has also been conferred on Armed Forces General
Staff Chief Anatolii Kvashnin, Federal Security Service
Director Nikolai Patrushev, Internal Affairs Minister
Vladimir Rushailo. and Foreign Intelligence Service Director
Vyacheslav Trubnikov. The newspaper commented that it is
unclear whether Yeltsin wants to "boost his prestige" in the
eyes of the power structures ahead of the State Duma
elections or reward those structures for their part in the
"anti-terrorist operation" in Chechnya. Earlier this year,
Yeltsin awarded Emergencies Minister Shoigu the same title,
shortly before reportedly asking him to head the
interregional movement Unity. JC/JAC

ANOTHER PARTY BARRED FROM REGISTRATION... The Central
Election Commission on 3 November refused to register the
Russian Conservative Movement of Businessmen (RKPP) because
one of its top three candidates, singer and composer Yurii
Antonov, failed to declare all of his 1998 income, ITAR-TASS
reported. Under the election law, disqualification of one of
a party or bloc's top three candidates disqualifies the
entire party. RKPP was the fourth election association to
excluded. The others were Vladimir Zhirinovskii's Liberal
Democratic Party of Russia, Nur, and the National Salvation
Front. Zhirinovskii, however, succeeded in registering his
own eponymous bloc. JAC

...AS REFORM OF ELECTION LAW SUGGESTED... RFE/RL's Moscow
bureau reports that election commission head Aleksandr
Veshnyakov has been criticized for being a strict legalist
while neglecting the larger mission of ensuring a fair
election process. Sergei Ryabov of the Carnegie Moscow Center
told RFE/RL that "Veshnyakov's tactic is to stick to the
letter of the law" and this gives "imperfect results because
the law is imperfect." In an interview with "Izvestiya" on 4
November, Veshnyakov admitted that the law needs to be fine-
tuned but not overhauled. "Kommersant-Daily" suggested the
same day that certain provisions of the law may be amended,
particularly the one that requires an entire party to be
barred if any of the top three candidates are disqualified.
JAC

...AND FINAL TALLY SHOWS 35 PERCENT FEWER GROUPS THAN LAST
ELECTION. Also on 3 November, the commission registered seven
groups, including the Social Democrats, the Peace, Labor and
May movement, the Cedar (Kedr), movement, All Russian Party
of the People, Viktor Anpilov's Stalinist Bloc, Communists
for the Soviet Union and Ivan Rybkin's Socialist Party of
Russia. However, the commission excluded 25 percent of the
last-named party's list of candidates, according to "Vremya
MN" on 4 November. When the registration process concluded, a
total of five blocs and 23 associations had been registered,
compared with 43 blocs and associations in the last
elections. JAC

RUSSIA TEST-FIRES ANTI-MISSILE ROCKET. Commander of the
Russian Strategic Rocket Forces Colonel General Vladimir
Yakovlev said that the 3 November launch of an anti-missile
rocket from the Sary-Shagan test site in Kazakhstan may be
seen in the context of "possible symmetrical and asymmetrical
response measures" if the U.S. withdraws from the 1972 Anti-
Ballistic Missile Treaty. Yakovlev noted that "this latest
successful launch" was the first since 1993, adding that it
showed the missile is combat-ready, Interfax reported.
Reuters quoted a senior U.S. State Department official as
saying it is "distressing that Russia is raising the specter
of arms competition when what we're trying to do is work
cooperatively with them to focus on rogue states." JC

ALLEGED MOSCOW BOMBER CHARGED... Police in Moscow have filed
charges against one unidentified man in connection with the
explosions this summer of two apartment buildings in that
city, Interfax reported on 3 November. Aleksandr Tsarenko,
head of the Federal Security Service's Moscow directorate,
told the agency that the investigation into the bombings is
almost complete and the FSB believes the acts were carried
out by a group loyal to Chechen field commanders Shamil
Basaev and Khattab. He added that the FSB is searching for
two other suspects who are believed to be hiding in Chechnya.
JAC

...AS MOSCOW POPULATION LOSES SEVERAL THOUSAND. Almost 500
person have been deported from Moscow, while almost 8,000
left of their own accord, "Moskovskaya pravda" reported on 4
November. According to the daily, Moscow's municipal
immigration service pressed charges against 147 local
companies for illegal employment of "foreign" workers. The
deportations occurred, despite a recent ruling by the Russian
Constitutional Court Judge Gaddis Gadzhiev, who said that as
long as there is no emergency regime in place in the country,
"any restriction of citizens' rights and freedom is
intolerable." He added that the internal deportation of
citizens is "illegal" (see "RFE/RL Watchlist," 7 October
1999). JAC

MINERS TO STRIKE JUST IN TIME FOR ELECTIONS? The Kemerovo
Oblast Workers Council is planning a Kuzbass-wide protest
action in the near future, delegates to the All-Kuzbass
Congress of Workers Collectives told reporters on 3 November.
According to "Izvestiya" the next day, delegates believe such
a protest is justified to call attention to the continuing
deterioration of the socio-economic situation in the oblast.
They did not rule out also staging a protest in Moscow,
possibly on the bridge next to the government building.
Council chairman Vitalii Malanin expressed confidence that
the upcoming protest action will spark similar protests
across the country. He added that media in the Kemerovo
region "do not dare express their own opinion" against
[Kemerovo Governor Aman Tuleev]" because they are dependent
on him for financial support. JAC

PUTIN CALLS FOR VISA REGIME FOR AZERBAIJAN, GEORGIA. Speaking
at a cabinet session on 4 November, Prime Minister Putin
ordered the Foreign Ministry to begin negotiations with
Azerbaijan and Georgia on imposing a temporary visa
requirement for citizens of those countries wishing to enter
Russia, ITAR-TASS reported. Putin argued that such a step is
necessary to prevent Chechen gunmen freely crossing into the
Russian Federation from those two countries. Russian Border
Guard Commander Konstantin Totskii reported to the meeting on
his talks two days earlier with his Georgian counterpart,
Valerii Chkheidze. At those talks, Chkheidze refused to agree
to Russian and Georgian frontier guards joint patrolling the
Chechen sector of the Russian-Georgian border. Totskii said
that at present only 70 Georgian border guards patrol the 80-
kilometer stretch of border but that number will be increased
to 100. LF

POLAND REFUSES TO RANSOM RESEARCHERS ABDUCTED IN DAGHESTAN.
The Polish government has rejected a demand for a ransom of
$1 million for each of the two women researchers from the
Polish Academy of Sciences who were kidnapped in Daghestan in
August, Interfax reported on 3 November (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 17 August 1999). The two women are currently being
held captive in the Chechen town of Urus-Martan, according to
Caucasus Press. LF

TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

ARMENIAN PRESIDENT NAMES NEW PREMIER... Robert Kocharian on 3
November appointed Aram Sargsian to succeed his murdered
elder brother, Vazgen, as prime minister, RFE/RL's Yerevan
bureau reported. Sargsian's candidacy was proposed by the
majority Miasnutiun parliamentary faction, one of whose
leaders, Andranik Markarian, said there will be no changes in
Armenia's economic policy or its approach to resolving the
Karabakh conflict. Sargsian, who is 38, is a construction
engineer who, like his brother, fought as a volunteer in
Nagorno-Karabakh in the early 1990s. Since 1993, he has been
employed at the Ararat cement plant and became its director
in 1998, according to Noyan Tapan. A member of the Republican
Party, Sargsian was elected a deputy to the parliament in May
but has no other political experience. LF

...PLEDGES ECONOMIC CONTINUITY. Meeting on 3 November with a
group of Armenian bankers, President Kocharian vowed that
last week's murders of senior officials will not affect the
country's commitment to economic reform, RFE/RL's Yerevan
bureau reported. "We are able to overcome the existing
problems and continue the country's development in a
constitutional way," he said. Central Bank Chairman Tigran
Sarkisian told the gathering that the IMF and World Bank have
expressed their readiness to discuss possible additional
economic and technical assistance to help Armenia recover
from the aftermath of the shootings. The national currency
continues to strengthen gradually against the U.S. dollar,
but some analysts have expressed concern that the killings
may deter potential foreign investors. LF

MORE ARRESTS IN CONNECTION WITH ARMENIAN PARLIAMENT
SHOOTINGS. Military police have detained an unspecified
number of people in connection with the 27 October shootings
in the parliament, Noyan Tapan reported on 3 November, citing
an unnamed source close to the country's law enforcement
agencies. The five gunmen directly responsible for the
killings were taken into custody after surrendering on 28
October. LF

AZERBAIJAN'S OPPOSITION DEMANDS CLARIFICATION OF KARABAKH
NEGOTIATING STANCE. Members of the opposition parliamentary
Democratic Bloc called on parliamentary speaker Murtuz
Alesqerov on 2 November to answer questions related to the
ongoing negotiations with Armenia on a settlement of the
Karabakh conflict, Turan reported. Those questions include
which precise concessions the Azerbaijani leadership is
prepared to make; whether the degree of self-government given
to Nagorno-Karabakh includes the right to a separate
constitution, legal system, and national army; whether the
peace agreement under discussion provides for the return of
displaced persons to Shusha, Lachin, and Kelbadjar; and
whether the Azerbaijani leadership has taken into
consideration the possibility that concessions could spark
massive protests among the country's population. LF

GEORGIA EXPRESSES CONCERN AT RUSSIA'S VIOLATION OF CFE
CEILING. Shalva Pichkhadze, who is foreign policy adviser to
President Eduard Shevardnadze, said on 3 November that if
Russia continues its arms buildup in Chechnya in violation of
the limits imposed by the CFE treaty, then Georgia will
intensify its campaign for NATO membership, AP and Interfax
reported. Shevardnadze said last week that he hopes for
Georgian accession to the alliance by 2005. Also on 3
November, Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Vladimir
Rakhmanin told journalists in Moscow that Russian will
withdraw from the North Caucasus military equipment in excess
of its CFE quotas as soon as the situation in Chechnya is
"under control," according to Interfax. LF

TALKS ON CLOSURE OF RUSSIAN BASES IN GEORGIA DEADLOCKED.
Georgian parliamentary Defense and Security Commission
Chairman Revaz Adamia told Interfax on 3 November that Moscow
and Tbilisi are at odds over the timeframe for the closure of
Russia's military bases in Georgia. Adamia said that Georgia
wants those bases to be closed within six to 18 months, while
Russia insists they should remain for 25 years as provided
for under the terms of a 1995 bilateral treaty, which the
Georgian parliament has not ratified. LF

KAZAKH OFFICIAL PREDICTS CANCER CASES WILL DOUBLE AS RESULT
OF ROCKET EXPLOSION. A senior medical official predicted on 2
November that the incidence of cancer in the regions of
central Kazakhstan affected by the 27 October explosion of a
Russian Proton rocket will double over the next two or three
years, RFE/RL's Kazakh Service reported the following day.
Russian scientists have claimed that the adverse consequences
of the blast will be minimal (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 3
November 1999). LF

KAZAKH LEADERSHIP WANTS TO EXPAND ECONOMIC COOPERATION WITH
GERMANY, JAPAN. President Nursultan Nazarbaev and Prime
Minister Qasymzhomart Toqaev met separately on 2 and 3
November, respectively, with a visiting German delegation
from Sachsen-Anhalt, RFE/RL's Kazakh Service reported.
Delegation head Gerhard Glogowski told both Kazakh officials
in response to their plea for greater German investment in
Kazakhstan that the country should enact legislation
protecting foreign investors. Germany is one of Kazakhstan's
main trade partners, with annual trade turnover estimated at
$650 million. Also on 3 November, Toqaev told a visiting
delegation from Japan's Marubeni Corporation that Kazakhstan
considers expanding economic relations with Japan "a
priority," Interfax reported. Marubeni is interested in a
$300-400 million project for reconstructing the Atyrau oil
refinery. A feasibility plan for the plant's reconstruction
is nearing completion. An agreement on the project is likely
to be signed during Nazarbaev's visit to Japan at the end of
the year. LF

HEAD OF KYRGYZ PRESIDENTIAL STAFF NAMED TO HEAD AUDIT
COMMISSION. President Askar Akaev on 3 November named Medet
Sadyrkulov to head the Auditing Commission, a post that Akaev
said entails coordinating the activities of all public
organizations that support reform in the runup to the
February 2000 parliamentary elections, RFE/RL's Bishkek
bureau reported. Interfax quoted Akaev as saying that those
elections are crucial to Kyrgyzstan's image as a democratic
country. He told Sadyrkulov to ensure that criminal elements
are prevented from entering the new parliament and that
governors and ministers do not use budget funds to finance
their associates' election campaigns. LF

OSCE DECIDES AGAINST MONITORING TAJIK PRESIDENTIAL POLL. A
spokesman for the OSCE has said that organization will not
send a delegation to Tajikistan to monitor the 6 November
presidential poll, an RFE/RL correspondent reported on 3
November. The spokesman said that given the restrictions on
candidates and the activities of political parties, the
election process does not meet the standards set by the OSCE
for a democratic poll. Economics and Foreign Economic
Relations Minister Davlat Usmon, whom the Central Electoral
Commission has registered as a candidate, despite his failure
to submit the required 145,000 signatures in his support,
said on 3 November he will not formally withdraw his
candidacy as it is illegal, ITAR-TASS reported. The Central
Electoral Commission has confirmed that Usmon has not
withdrawn from the poll and that his name is on the ballot
sheet together with that of incumbent Imomali Rakhmonov. LF

DEFENSE MINISTERS REVIEW CENTRAL ASIAN JOINT MANEUVERS. The
defense ministers of Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan,
Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan have assessed the five-day joint
exercises held in Uzbekistan and Kyrgyzstan, Interfax and
Asia Plus-Blitz reported. Those maneuvers, which ended on 1
November, were aimed at coordinating measures to repulse a
terrorist attack. Russian Defense Minister Igor Sergeev told
his colleagues that Russian and Uzbek forces will be ready by
next spring to launch cross-border attacks into Tajik
territory in order to preempt an anticipated strike by Uzbek
Islamist forces. Sergeev added that Russia will extend
assistance to Kyrgyzstan within the framework of the CIS
Collective Security Treaty if those guerrillas launch a
further incursion into Kyrgyzstan. Meanwhile in Astana, a
Kazakh Interior Ministry press secretary denied that
unidentified gunmen have crossed into southern Kazakhstan
from neighboring Uzbekistan, Interfax reported on 3 November.
LF

END NOTE

WHEN 'SALVATION' IS DAMNATION

by Michael Shafir

	It hardly matters whether the neo-Nazi group in Russia
that calls itself Spas (Salvation) managed to have its list
approved by the Russian Central Electoral Commission (CEC)
for the 19 December State Duma elections as a result of
official incompetence or because its leader, Aleksandr
Barkashov, has cunningly calculated his moves. The second
scenario would be nothing more than yet another example of
the ongoing exploitation by extremist leaders of the
weaknesses of the system they want to destroy--democracy.
	On 18 October, the CEC registered the list of Spas,
which thereby became one of 31 organizations to submit
registration documents before the 24 October deadline. On 25
October, the Justice Ministry appealed to the Supreme Court
to bar Spas from running on the grounds that the group has
violated the law on public association. The ministry argued
that Spas provided false information about the number of its
regional branches. The law requires that nationwide movements
have organizations in at least half of the 89 federation
subjects, and Spas submitted data on 47 such organizations. A
check carried out by the ministry, however, failed to locate
such organizations in at least 10 of those regions, according
to "Kommersant-Daily" on 2 November. That begs the question
as to what the ministry was doing up to 25 October.
	It was certainly not in the dark about Barkashov's lack
of scruples. His Russian National Unity (RNE) party had been
set up in 1990, and if it acquired some notoriety, it was
precisely because it played "the democratic game" and at the
same time undermined democracy by, among other things,
setting up illegal paramilitary formations. Spas was
registered one year ago, to include RNE and two other small
and unknown groups. Those facts again raise the question as
to what Justice Ministry was doing until now.
	Justice Minister Yurii Chaika told Interfax on 2
November that Barkashov must be stopped because "people
sharing Nazi ideology cannot run for elected government
bodies in Russia." But Barkashov's identification with that
ideology is nothing new. In accordance with the law, the
ministry should have warned Spas twice before asking for the
organization to be outlawed. It failed to do so even once,
however. Had it taken those steps, appealing to the Supreme
Court to cancel Spas's registration might have been rendered
unnecessary. Hence the question: what has the ministry been
doing until now?
	After all, it could have followed the example set by
Moscow Mayor Yurii Luzhkov, who last December prevented RNE
from holding a congress in Moscow and, in response to
Barkashov's threats to stage a march by 100,000 sympathizers,
complained to the Prosecutor-General's Office. That agency
pressed charges against Barkashov for instigation to
violence. Furthermore, a court outlawed the Moscow branch of
RNE, and another court in the capital annulled the
registration of one of Barkashov's publications. While
Luzhkov is hardly the personification of democracy, in this
instance he acted correctly.
	To make matters even worse, the Russian Federation
Supreme Court on 1 November refused to examine the ministry's
appeal against the group's registration, referring it to a
raion court. But the lower court did not rule by 3 November,
meaning that the list approved by the CEC remains valid. Does
this mean that the bureaucrats at the Justice Ministry are
unaware of how justice is administered in their country?
	The name "Spas," chosen by Barkashov for his group,
speaks volumes about what he himself stands for. Roger
Griffin, a leading scholar on the history of fascism, defines
that movement as "a genus of political ideology whose mythic
core in its various permutations is a palingenetic form of
populist ultra-nationalism". The unusual term "palingenetic,"
according to Griffin, expresses "the myth of rebirth,
regeneration." This myth is common to all fascists--old and
new, eastern or western, southern or northern. What it
amounts to is a belief that democracy is a form of social and
moral decay and that "regeneration" or "revival" not only
justifies "drastic means" but is achieved by using such
means. And thus it is no accident that a recently published
book by Vladimir Tismaneanu, a Romanian-born political
scientist, dealing with this phenomenon in the post-communist
world, is called "Fantasies of Salvation."
	Spas is not the only dangerous fantasy to haunt Russia.
Among the no fewer than 81 parties, movements or associations
with extremist postures, there are groups called the Russian
Party of Spiritual Revival, the Union for the Revival of the
Fatherland, the Union of the Fatherland, and, of course, the
Front of National Salvation. Post-communist Poland has its
own National Rebirth of Poland party. In all likelihood,
there are more.
	And thus the final question: Do officials at the Russian
Justice Ministry understand that there comes a point in
history at which "salvation" almost certainly leads to
damnation?
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1999 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
hermanoval@rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 25 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour LIVE
Broadcast Studio. http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble via
email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Fabian Schmidt, SchmidtF@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Asta Banionis, Pete Baumgartner, Victor Gomez, Mel Huang,
Dan Ionescu, Jolyon Naegele, Matyas Szabo, Anthony
Wesolowsky, Martins J. Zvaners, Mato Zsolt-Istvan

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole