When two people communicate, they each can be enriched - and unlike traditional resources, the more you share the more you have. - U.S. Vice President Al Gore
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 180, Part II, 15 September 1999


___________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 3, No. 180, Part II, 15 September 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern
Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by the
staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe. Part I covers Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document. Back issues of RFE/RL
Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at RFE/RL's Web
site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part II

* U.S. AMBASSADOR TO MINSK RESUMES DUTIES AFTER 15 MONTHS

* RETURNING SERBIAN REFUGEES AMBUSHED IN KOSOVA

* DJUKANOVIC TO MEDIATE BETWEEN FEUDING SERBIAN OPPOSITION
LEADERS?

End Note: TEN YEARS LATER: HOW POLAND LED THE WAY
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

U.S. AMBASSADOR TO MINSK RESUMES DUTIES AFTER 15 MONTHS.
Daniel Speckhard returned to his post in Belarus on 14
September after being recalled to protest his eviction from
the ambassador's residence in June 1998. The U.S. State
Department said Speckhard's return was made possible by
Belarus's pledge to abide by the Vienna Convention and to
compensate for losses suffered by the U.S. embassy as a
result of Speckhard's eviction. "I'm very glad to return to
Belarus--we have fallen in love [with the country],"
Speckhard said at a Minsk airport. "Having Ambassador
Speckhard back in Minsk will enable us more effectively to
promote democracy and human rights, help those who support
and work for the restoration of democratic rule, and promote
other interests that we have in Belarus," the State
Department noted. JM

KUCHMA'S RIVALS APPEAL TO COUNCIL OF EUROPE OVER ELECTIONS.
Presidential hopefuls Yevhen Marchuk, Oleksandr Moroz,
Volodymyr Oliynyk, and Oleksandr Tkachenko have asked the
Council of Europe's Parliamentary Assembly to monitor the
campaign for the 31 October presidential election in Ukraine.
The four said they believe it is necessary to send observers
in early October to "make it possible to conduct the final
stage of the election campaign on the principles of
lawfulness," UNIAN reported on 14 September. They also
accused the government of illegally suspending the regular
radio broadcast of parliamentary sessions in order to
restrict the media access of President Leonid Kuchma's top
rivals, who are all lawmakers. JM

ESTONIAN OPPOSITION CALL FOR DIRECT PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION.
Opposition groups in the parliament have heeded the Center
Party's call for direct presidential elections. All factions
that do not belong to the ruling coalition supported a bill
calling for a referendum on changing the presidential
election system. Currently, the parliament elects the
president; in the event that it is unable to gain a two-
thirds majority, an electoral college is convened. The ruling
coalition has not made a statement on the opposition bill,
although many prominent members, such as Foreign Minister
Toomas Hendrik Ilves, have made similar proposals. In the
early 1930s, the Estonian Constitution was changed to provide
for directly elected presidents, which indirectly led to the
authoritarian regime of Konstantin Pats. MH

ESTONIAN GOVERNMENT APPROVES 2000 BUDGET. The government on
14 September approved the 2000 budget and will send it to the
parliament once final details have been resolved later this
month. The budget totals 17.1 billion kroons ($1.13 billion),
foresees 3.8-4 percent growth in GDP, and, as Prime Minister
Mart Laar stressed, is balanced. It also takes into
consideration the introduction of import tariffs and the
abolition of corporate income taxes. Only the Ministries of
Defense, Education, Culture, and Foreign Affairs will receive
more funds than in 1999. This year's budget totaled 17.46
billion kroons following the introduction of the 1 billion
kroons negative supplement (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 29 June
1999). MH

POLAND TO CRACK DOWN ON INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THEFT. The
Polish government on 14 September approved a bill aimed at
cracking down on bootleg copies of compact discs, videos, and
computer programs. The bill extends copyright ownership
rights from the current 25 years to 70 years and empowers
prosecutors to launch investigations without waiting for
complaints from producer or other interested parties, as is
the case now. Under the bill, those selling unlicensed audio,
video, and software material will face up to two years in
jail. According to government estimates, losses caused by
intellectual property theft in Poland amounted to $227
million last year. The bill must be approved by the
parliament and signed by the president. JM

WARSAW AUTHORITIES BAN MASS PROTEST. The Warsaw Municipal
Office on 14 September banned an anti-government protest that
the left-wing National Trade Union Alliance (OPZZ) planned to
hold in Warsaw on 24 September. The OPZZ had said it expected
100,000 people to take part in the protest. "The arrival in
Warsaw of several dozen protesters and a march along Warsaw's
main thoroughfares would paralyze the city transport," the
municipal office argued. JM

POLISH NURSES TO PROTEST AGAIN. Nurses and midwives will
launch protest actions throughout the country on 20
September, PAP reported on 15 September. Those actions will
include sit-ins at health care centers, pickets, marches,
road blocks, and hunger strikes. Bozena Banachowicz,
chairwoman of the trade union of nurses and midwifes, said
the government has not fulfilled the promises it made in July
following a wave of similar protests. "Some 90 percent of
nurses have not obtained their [promised] pay rises,"
Banachowicz said. JM

SUDETEN GERMANS WELCOME CZECH CONSTITUTIONAL COURT RULING.
Franz Neubauer, spokesman of the organization of expelled
Sudeten Germans, said a recent ruling by the Czech
Constitutional Court is "a step in the right direction," CTK
reported on 14 September, citing the Austrian news agency
APA. The court had ruled that people of German and Hungarian
origin whose property was confiscated under the 1945 Benes
decrees and who can prove their loyalty toward the former
Czechoslovakia and their innocence of collaboration with the
Nazi occupying forces are entitled to the restitution of
their confiscated property. At the same time, Neubauer said,
the decision is based on "the presumption of guilt," since
those affected must produce proof of their innocence. In a
state based on the rule of the law, he argued, this is
"inadmissible." MS

CZECH DEPUTIES OVERRIDE PRESIDENTIAL VETO. By a vote of 173
to 14, the Chamber of Deputies on 14 September overrode
President Vaclav Havel's veto of an amendment to a law that
removes from the list of lawyers those with less than four
years' professional experience, with the exception of
government and local government officials, senators, and
other civil servants (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 17 August 1999).
Social Democratic Party deputy Zdenek Jicinsky said the
presidential objections to the bill are "unsubstantiated"
because the law "serves public interest." MS

SLOVAK CABINET REVISES FOREIGN EXCHANGE REGULATIONS. The
cabinet on 14 September approved amendments to the Foreign
Exchange Act that liberalize the movement of foreign capital
on Slovak markets, SITA reported. Finance Minister Brigita
Schmognerova told journalists that the amendments, which must
be approved by the parliament, improve Slovakia's chance of
becoming a member of the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development. They also allow insurance
companies, investment companies, and trusts to own real
estate in Slovakia. Until now, this right was limited to
banks. Moreover, the range of foreign stocks that can be
traded without permission on the Slovak capital market is
widened. Schmognerova said the amendments bring the Slovak
crown close to full convertibility. MS

SLOVAK NATIONALIST LEADER DENIES HUNGARIAN 'ALLEGATIONS.'
Speaking to journalists in Bradlo on 13 September, Slovak
National Party (SNS) honorary chairman Vitazoslav Moric
denied Party of Hungarian Coalition (SMK) chairman Bela
Bugar's "allegations" that the defacement of a monument to
General Milan Rastislav Stefanik last month was a provocation
aimed at fomenting anti-Hungarian sentiment (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 9 September 1999). Moric said Bugar "must have
gone mad" and that no Slovak would deface that monument. He
said he felt "personally offended" because Bugar said the
deed was committed by a former policeman from Martin who is a
bodyguard to an opposition deputy. He pointed out that he
himself is the only deputy from Martin who employs a former
policemen as bodyguard. SNS chairman Jan Slota said that his
party "will not be intimidated" into keeping silent about
"those who anchored in their program this country's
[territorial] disintegration," SITA reported. MS

HUNGARIAN NATIONAL BANK'S VIENNA SUBSIDIARY INVOLVED IN MONEY
LAUNDERING? Several former East European secret services made
use of CW Bank in Vienna, and billions of German marks may
have been smuggled out of the former East Germany to Austria
in money-laundering operations, Hungarian National Bank (MNB)
President Gyorgy Suranyi told journalists on 14 September.
Suranyi was responding to Prime Minister Viktor Orban's
recent decision not to nominate any official at the MNB until
the matter of a 70 billion forint ($300 million) loss
suffered by the bank's Vienna subsidiary is cleared up.
Suranyi said the loss is due to "irresponsible and
outrageous" mismanagement at CW Bank between 1991-1995. MSZ

HUNGARIAN '56 REVOLUTION TRIAL OPENS IN BUDAPEST. The trial
of Istvan Dudas, a former border guard commander in
Mosonmagyarovar, western Hungary, and three of his former
subordinates began in Budapest on 14 September. The four men
are accused of crimes against humanity. In particular, the
75-year-old Dudas is charged with ordering his soldiers to
open fire on a crowd of peaceful demonstrators on 26 October
1956; some 100 people died in that incident. In June, the
Supreme Court overruled a lower court's decision saying that
the statute of limitation does not apply to crimes against
humanity and ordering the re-opening of legal proceedings.
MSZ

'MEIN KAMPF' PUBLISHER TO BE INDICTED IN HUNGARY? Hungarian
police have recommended that the Prosecutor-General's Office
indict Aron Monus for publishing a Hungarian-language version
of Adolf Hitler's "Mein Kampf," Hungarian media reported on
15 September. In 1997, the Federation of Jewish Communities
in Hungary protested the book's publication, saying it
incited racial hatred. MSZ

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

RETURNING SERBIAN REFUGEES AMBUSHED IN KOSOVA. Unidentified
attackers fired at a convoy of returning Serbian refugees
near Ranilug, in the U.S. sector of Kosova, on 14 September,
AP reported. One unidentified person was killed and two Serbs
injured. Elsewhere, KFOR soldiers found two elderly
Montenegrin women killed in their home in Peja. In Prishtina,
unidentified attackers fired a rocket-propelled grenade into
a Serbian cafe, injuring three Serbs, Reuters reported.
Tanjug reported that 13 prisoners in Mitrovica--11 Serbs, one
Montenegrin, and one ethnic Albanian--went on a hunger strike
to protest what they called "total disregard" of Serbian
criminal law in proceedings that the recently established UN
court has launched against them. In an open letter, the
prisoners said they were jailed on the basis of "unfounded
reports and testimonies" by anonymous ethnic Albanians. FS

ETHNIC ALBANIAN REPRESENTATIVES AGREE ON DEMOCRACY PLAN. A
group of 39 ethnic Albanians representing four political
parties, various social organizations, and media outlets in
Kosova agreed in Washington on 14 September on "a framework
of basic principles, practices, and procedures to help guide
Kosova during and after its transition to democratic self-
rule," Reuters reported. The Kosovars, including the Kosova
Liberation Army's Hashim Thaci, were invited by the U.S.
Institute of Peace at the State Department's request. In a
10-page document, the Kosovars agreed to support a "multi-
ethnic society that includes equal opportunity for all." U.S.
Secretary of State Madeleine Albright told the delegation:
"You must combat the temptations of revenge, corruption, and
criminality.... Evidence of unchecked criminality would lose
you the support of the international community and the trust
of your people." FS

PRODI URGES BALKAN PEOPLE TO OVERCOME HATRED. President-
designate of the European Commission Romano Prodi told the
European Parliament in Strasbourg on 14 September that the
people of the Balkans must overcome conflicts among
themselves in order to be included in the process of European
integration, an RFE/RL South Slavic Service correspondent
reported. The parliamentary commission on Southeastern
Europe, headed by German legislator Doris Pack, is scheduled
to submit a proposal to the European Parliament on 15
September on financing Kosova's reconstruction. The plan
envisages annual expenses of 500 million euros ($519.5
million) up to the year 2004. Pack recently voiced sharp
criticism of the EU agency for the reconstruction of Kosova
and demanded that the EU office in Prishtina become largely
independent of its counterpart in Thessaloniki (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 22 July 1999). FS

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT SETS UP FUND FOR SERBIAN REFUGEES. The
European Parliament has agreed to set up a special fund to
help Serbian refugees from Kosova, Vladan Batic of the
opposition Alliance for Change told the Frankfurt-based
Serbian daily "Vesti" of 15 September. Batic added that the
alliance recently proposed setting up the fund. Strasbourg's
approval is the first success of the alliance on the
international stage, he noted. PM

NO SERBIAN JUDGES ON KOSOVA COURT. UN Special Representative
Bernard Kouchner swore in five judges and two prosecutors for
a newly formed court of appeals in Prishtina on 14 September,
Reuters reported. All are ethnic Albanians and some are legal
professionals whom Milosevic fired in 1989. Kouchner said
that he has been unable to find any Serbs who are qualified
for jobs with the appeals court. He added that he will
continue to look for suitable applicants and "hold open" an
unspecified number of positions for Serbs. PM

ANNAN 'ALARMED' OVER HUMANITARIAN SITUATION IN SERBIA. UN
Secretary-General Kofi Annan is "alarmed" over the
"deteriorating humanitarian situation" in Serbia, his
spokesman said in New York on 14 September. He noted that
"the sharp contraction of the economy in 1999, coupled with
inflation, is compounding severe pension and salary problems
and dramatically reducing the population's resources. There
is a real threat of rising food prices and dwindling drug
supply, problems which will be exacerbated by plummeting
household income, partly due to a dramatic increase in
unemployment." This is the first time that Annan has raised
such concerns in public, AP reported. PM

SERBIAN PREMIER TELLS OPPOSITION NOT TO EXPECT OUTSIDE AID.
Prime Minister Mirko Marjanovic said in Belgrade that
hyperinflation will not return (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 13
September 1999). He called unnamed opposition leaders
"Lilliputians" whom NATO is using to "destroy the
government," "Danas" reported on 15 September. He added that
the government "does not have time to respond to mindless
criticism from compromised politicians and leaders of tiny
political parties." Marjanovic stressed that only the
government is working for the benefit of Serbia's population.
He warned opposition-controlled cities and towns not to
expect any reconstruction aid from abroad. The EU recently
pledged aid to "democratically controlled" cities and towns
(see "RFE/RL Newsline," 14 September 1999). PM

CLINTON AND CO. FAIL TO APPEAR IN NIS. Judge Miloje Micic of
the Nis County Court canceled a hearing on war crimes on 14
September because 14 indicted persons failed to respond to
their respective summonses. The 14 included U.S. President
Bill Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State Albright, British Prime
Minister Tony Blair, French President Jacques Chirac, former
German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, and NATO Secretary-
General Javier Solana. The judge said that he will announce a
new date for a hearing once he has determined that the
indicted persons have indeed received their summonses,
"Danas" reported. PM

DJUKANOVIC TO MEDIATE BETWEEN FEUDING SERBIAN OPPOSITION
LEADERS? Vojvodina opposition leaders Miodrag Isakov and
Nenad Canak said that Montenegrin President Milo Djukanovic
has offered to mediate between Serbia's factious opposition
leaders, "Vesti" reported on 15 September. The two Vojvodina
leaders added that they support Montenegro's proposals for
changing the legal relationship between Serbia and
Montenegro. On 15 September, Djukanovic said in Budapest that
he fully supports the Serbian opposition. He stressed that
only Serbs can bring democracy to Serbia. PM

KILIBARDA: MILOSEVIC MANIPULATING MONTENEGRIN CLANS.
Montenegrin People's Party leader and Deputy Prime Minister
Novak Kilibarda said that Milosevic and Momir Bulatovic, who
is his chief ally in Montenegro, have "manipulated" several
recent meetings of traditional clan organizations for their
own political ends. At the clan gatherings, many speakers
called for the preservation of unity between Montenegro and
Serbia, "Danas" reported on 15 December. Most recently,
leaders of the Piper clan said they will secede from
Montenegro if the government declares independence from
Serbia. The Piper clan officials said that independence would
render null and void the 1796 agreement under which the
Pipers joined Montenegro. PM

MUSLIMS RETURN TO PALE. Some 30 Muslim families received keys
to their rebuilt houses in the Pale area on 14 September,
Reuters reported. It was the first organized return of Muslim
residents to the ski resort, which became the Bosnian Serb
capital during the 1992-1995 war (see "RFE/RL Balkan Report,"
14 September 1999). The UNHCR's Werner Blatter called the
return a "breakthrough." PM

KARADZIC IN SREBRENICA? Wartime Bosnian Serb leader and
indicted war criminal Radovan Karadzic recently gave a speech
in Srebrenica in the company of his long-time ally Momcilo
Krajisnik, Reuters reported on 15 September. Karadzic praised
the "heroism" of Serbian forces during the 1992-1995 war and
urged Serbs not to leave the town "where the most glorious
pages of Serbian history have been written." Srebrenica was
the scene of the largest massacre in post-1945 Europe after
Serbian forces captured it from the Muslims in July 1995. An
agreement between the international community and Bosnian
Serb leaders specifies that Karadzic is not to make any
public appearances. Unconfirmed reports occasionally appear
in the regional or international media that he has been
sighted in Belgrade, Montenegro, or eastern Bosnia. He is one
of the most wanted war criminals sought by the Hague-based
tribunal. PM

BOSNIAN SERBS TO RETURN TO MILITARY TALKS. A spokeswoman for
the international community's Wolfgang Petritsch said in
Sarajevo on 14 September that Bosnian Serb military officials
have agreed to resume attending regular meetings of the
Standing Committee on Military Matters with Muslim, Croatian,
and international representatives (see "RFE/RL Balkan
Report," 31 August 1999). PM

MAJKO PROMISES SECURITY IN TROPOJA. Albanian Prime Minister
Pandeli Majko, visiting Tropoja on 14 September, promised
local inhabitants that he will restore the rule of law there,
an RFE/RL South Slavic Service correspondent reported. Majko
said that it is necessary that the government and opposition
communicate with each other and put an end to rhetoric of
hate and "politics of the street." Majko accepted his
administration's responsibility for the delayed
implementation of public order in Tropoja region. He stressed
that it is unacceptable that Tropoja is becoming an "oasis of
crime." Majko rejected the view that in Albania there is
antagonism between the north and the south, and he thanked
the citizens of Tropoja for helping border guards and
refugees during the Kosova conflict. FS

ROMANIAN ORTHODOX CHURCH IS 'NATIONAL' AFTER ALL. Government
spokeswoman Adriana Saftoiu said on 14 September that Prime
Minister Radu Vasile has "used his prerogatives" to send to
the parliament a draft law on religious denominations in
which the Romanian Orthodox Church is defined as a "National
Church." The government last week decided not to grant that
status to the Church, prompting a strong protest by Patriarch
Teoctist (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 10 and 13 September 1999).
MS

MOLDOVAN DEFENSE MINISTRY DENIES MERCENARIES FOUGHT IN
KOSOVA. The Defense Ministry on 14 September denied that
Moldovan mercenaries fought on the side of Yugoslavia during
the Kosova crisis, Flux reported (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 14
September 1999). The ministry said allegations by the
Moldovan Helsinki Committee on Human Rights chairman Stefan
Uratu "tarnish the image of Moldova's army and of Moldova as
a whole." However, the ministry indirectly confirmed Uratu's
declaration the previous day that retired officers applied to
serve in Yugoslavia. The ministry noted that those officers
believed the Moldovan peace-keeping force about to be set up
under the Partnership for Peace program would be sent there
to serve with Yugoslav forces. MS

END NOTE

TEN YEARS LATER: HOW POLAND LED THE WAY

by Jan de Weydenthal

	Ten years ago, the Polish Communists voluntarily stepped
down from power, after losing the first partly free elections
in a Soviet bloc country. The largest of the East European
countries, Poland led the way in bringing about the demise of
communism in the region. As Poland took step after step
toward democracy without provoking a response from Moscow,
other communist countries were emboldened to follow suit.
	It was in Poland that the Communists were first forced
by popular protests to accept a major breach in their power.
In September 1980, the labor union, Solidarity, was
established as the first independent union in a communist
country. Solidarity was suppressed by military force 16
months later, but public opposition to communist rule neither
disappeared nor weakened. Solidarity rebounded at the end of
the 1980s.
	It was also in Poland that the Communists were first
forced by public pressure to accept free parliamentary
elections. Such elections took place in June 1989, and the
Communists were declared the losers.
	And it was in Poland that the first democratic
government in East Central Europe took office after decades
of communist rule. In fact, the Polish Communists themselves
voted it into office on 12 September 1989.
	In the process, Poland's Communists, who had long
claimed for themselves the right to determine all aspects of
society's development, were gradually forced into obscurity.
They dissolved their party in 1990 and became social
democrats.
	The communists' downfall in Poland was a long time
coming. Years of divisiveness, managerial inefficiency, and
political corruption had weakened their control.
	Already in the 1970s, the Communists suffered severe
political setbacks twice (in 1970 and 1976) when they were
forced to change policies under pressure of workers'
protests.
	Their authority was further undermined when former
Cracow Cardinal Karol Wojtyla was elected pope in October
1978. Less than a year later, the pope, now known as John
Paul II, paid a visit to his native country, prompting an
outburst of national pride. In the eyes of most Poles, it was
the pope, rather than any communist leader, who had the right
to guide the nation.
	But ultimately, communism in Poland collapsed because
its proponent did not secure effective support from the
Soviet Union. Moscow declined to intervene to put down
Solidarity, instead pressing their Polish allies to do so.
The Soviet Union merely watched in early 1989 as the
Communists in Poland negotiated away political control. And
Soviet leaders eagerly opened a dialogue with the first
democratic, non-communist Polish government.
	These developments were not lost on other countries in
Central Europe. Dissidents in various countries had kept
close contacts with their Polish colleagues. They all took
note of Moscow's passive attitude toward Poland. And all were
determined to put it to the test in their own countries.
	Kestutis Girnius, the coordinator of RFE/RL's Baltic
services, notes that Soviet passivity toward Polish reform
was encouraging to democrats in neighboring Lithuania
"Similar processes were taking place in Lithuania, which
began to become more free in 1989," he said. "And the fact
that Moscow did not resort to violence to stop change in
Poland and prevent Solidarity from coming to power encouraged
Lithuania to believe that Moscow would eventually let them
go."
	Some analysts say Moscow's paralysis was the result of a
conscious policy guided by the widely proclaimed strategy of
perestroika. Others say Moscow was unable to intervene
because its economy was in decline and its army tied up in
the Afghan war.
	The legendary leader of Solidarity, Lech Walesa, said at
the time that communism collapsed because it was simply
outdated. In November 1989, he told a press conference in
Washington that political changes in the region merely
reflected the spirit of the times: "The reforms in Eastern
Europe are not happening because [Soviet leader Mikhail]
Gorbachev or Walesa or somebody else wants them. The
irreversibility of reform is based on the fact that those
reforms are part of the development of civilization. After
satellites, computers, and calculators, we are just following
the steps of technology. So there is no question about
reversibility or irreversibility of reforms. The question is
not if, but how. The question is in what time span and what's
the price going to be."
	Pro-democracy activists in other communist countries
supported those moves. Within months of the emergence of a
democratic government in Poland, an unstoppable wave of
change swept the entire region. And the system that dominated
Central European politics, economics and societies for
decades became history.

The author is an RFE/RL correspondent based in Prague.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1999 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
hermanoval@rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 25 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour LIVE
Broadcast Studio. http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble via
email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Fabian Schmidt, SchmidtF@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Asta Banionis, Pete Baumgartner, Victor Gomez, Dan Ionescu,
Zsolt-Istvan Mato, Jolyon Naegele, Matyas Szabo, Anthony
Wesolowsky, Martins J. Zvaners

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole