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RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 3, No. 78, Part II, 22 April 1999


________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 3, No. 78, Part II, 22 April 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and
Southeastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central
Asia prepared by the staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio
Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning
Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.  Part I
covers Russia, Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is
distributed simultaneously as a second document.  Back
issues of RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are
online at RFE/RL's Web site:
http://www.rferl.org/newsline

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Headlines, Part II

* KUCHMA SAYS UKRAINE, RUSSIA UNANIMOUS ON KOSOVA

* SOLANA: NATO TO STICK TO AIR CAMPAIGN

* MONTENEGRO VOWS TO REOPEN BORDER
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EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

KUCHMA SAYS UKRAINE, RUSSIA UNANIMOUS ON KOSOVA...
Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma told regional
journalists in Kyiv on 21 April that Ukraine backs
Russia's peace plan for Kosova. Earlier the same day,
Kuchma met with former Russian Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin, who is now Russia's special envoy for
Yugoslavia. "Our positions [on Kosova] fully coincide.
This problem can be resolved only through preserving
Yugoslavia's territorial integrity, granting Kosova
broad autonomy, halting military actions, and
withdrawing the Serbian army from Kosova," he said. JM

...EXPLAINS GOAL OF VISIT TO WASHINGTON... Kuchma also
said he is going to attend the NATO summit in Washington
"not to celebrate NATO's anniversary but to resolve
Ukraine's problems," Ukrainian Television reported.
Kuchma is planning to talk with U.S. President Bill
Clinton, U.S. senators and businessmen, and
representatives of the IMF and the World Bank during the
summit. Kuchma said Ukraine condemns the military action
in Kosova, but he added that he "as a politician cannot
ignore today's realities, including the fact of NATO's
existence." JM

...SLAMS LEGISLATURE FOR BLOCKING REFORM. Also on 21
April, Kuchma accused the Supreme Council of blocking
reform and turning itself into a leftist rostrum for the
presidential election campaign, Reuters reported. "Our
system of power is absolutely paralyzed. The parliament
no longer fulfills its main, law-making function and is
preoccupied with political bickering," he commented.
Communist lawmakers have threatened to boycott the
session and paralyze the legislature unless it overrides
presidential vetoes on a law providing one-time
subsidies to war veterans and another on increasing the
minimum pension from the current 16.6 hryvni ($4.2) to
55 hryvni. Meanwhile, leftist deputies on 21 April
failed once again to pass an anti-NATO bill (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 21 April 1999). JM

BELARUSIAN COURT EXAMINES TERRORIST ACT AGAINST
LUKASHENKA. At the Belarusian Supreme Court, the trial
of three residents of Mahileu began on 21 April. One of
the defendants is charged with killing Yauhen
Mikalutski, head of the Mahileu branch of the State
Control Committee, in a bomb attack on 6 October 1997.
The other two are accused of plotting a terrorist act
against Belarusian President Alyaksandr Lukashenka. The
trial is taking place behind closed doors. Lukashenka
said last October that the assassination of Mikalutski
was connected to an attempt on the president's life (see
"RFE/RL Newsline," 7 October 1998). Lukashenka also
suggested at the time that a plan to assassinate the
Belarusian president was prepared in the Drazdy
residential compound, near Minsk, where several Western
ambassadors had their residences. JM

IMPRISONED OPPOSITIONIST'S WIFE CONDUCTS HIS ELECTION
CAMPAIGN. Yuliya Chyhir, the wife of former Belarusian
Premier Mikhail Chyhir, who is now in jail on charges of
grand larceny (see "RFE/RL Newsline, 9 April 1999), is
campaigning for her husband in the opposition
presidential elections scheduled for 16 May, Belapan
reported on 21 April. According to Mrs. Chyhir, the
voters she has met are ready to participate in the
opposition elections. Lukashenka's popularity rating is
falling "not by days, but by hours," she commented. Mrs.
Chyhir also said that people are skeptical about the
charges against her husband and tend to view them as
politically motivated. Mrs. Chyhir is scheduled to speak
on RFE/RL on 25 April, together with the other
presidential candidate, Zyanon Paznyak, to answer
Belarusian voters' questions on behalf of her husband.
JM

BELARUS'S POLISH MINORITY LEADER FINED OVER SCHOOL
PROTEST. Tadeusz Gawin, head of the Union of Poles in
Belarus, was fined 115 million Belarusian rubles ($477)
by a Belarusian court on 21 April for organizing an
unsanctioned picket and for defaming three officials
(see "RFE/RL Newsline," 19 April 1999), Polish Radio
reported. "That is as much as an average Belarusian
earns over a year. I feel that this is an unjust
verdict, since all our actions and protests concerned
the fundamental issue of the development of Polish
schools in Belarus," Gawin told Polish Radio. JM

RUSSIAN-LATVIAN COMISSION TO RESUME WORK SOON? On
returning from Moscow, Latvian Transport Minister
Anatolijs Gorbunovs told journalists in Riga on 21 April
that his meeting with Russian Minister for National
Minorities Ramazan Abdulatipov was "very successful" and
"very constructive," LETA reported. Gorbunovs also
commented that in order to maintain "normal economic
relations" with Russia, Latvia should be "more yielding
and guarantee equal rights for Russian businessmen, as
Lithuania and Estonia do." The previous day, "Diena" had
quoted Abdulatipov as saying there are no "political
barriers" to resuming the work of the Russian-Latvian
intergovernmental commission. According to Abdulatipov,
all working groups of the commission will begin work
soon. Abdulatipov and Gorbunovs are co-chairmen of the
commission. JC

LITHUANIAN PARLIAMENT BACKS PREMIER... By a vote of 77
to 46 with five abstentions, the parliament has given
its backing to Prime Minister Gediminas Vagnorius,
following President Valdas Adamkus's expression of no
confidence in the premier earlier this week (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 20 April 1999). The vote on the non-binding
motion, proposed by the ruling Conservatives, was
secret, as requested by Vagnorius, ELTA reported.
Earlier, the premier had told lawmakers that if he
resigned now, the new government would be "subservient"
to the president. According to parliamentary chairman
Vytautas Landsbergis, the vote was "logical and
responsible" and gives the premier the green light to
continue in office. JC

...BUT PRESIDENT STILL WANTS HIM TO RESIGN. Responding
to the outcome of the vote in the parliament, Adamkus
expressed regret that the Conservatives did not seize
the opportunity to "take a step favorable for
Lithuania." He added that "all I can do now is wait for
the prime minister to make a decision." His spokeswoman,
Violeta Gaizauskaite, indicated that Adamkus had already
made clear in his 19 April television address that he
expects Vagnorius to resign, ELTA and BNS reported. The
premier, for his part, has said he will respond to the
president's charges within the next week. In the
meantime, Adamkus will attend the NATO summit in
Washington, before returning to Vilnius on 26 April. JC

LUSTRATION PROSECUTOR INVESTIGATES ALLEGATIONS AGAINST
POLISH PREMIER. Lustration prosecutor Boguslaw Nizienski
on 21 April questioned parliamentary deputy Tomasz
Karwowski, who has filed an application to lustrate
Polish Premier Jerzy Buzek (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 21
April 1999). "I never said that Buzek was a collaborator
of the [communist-era] special services, I said that I
have doubts about this matter," Karwowski told Polish
Radio later. Nizienski has decided to call other
witnesses before making any decision on Buzek.
Meanwhile, Solidarity leader Marian Krzaklewski has said
he is convinced that Buzek was not a collaborator.
Krzaklewski added that he "absolutely precludes" the
possibility that Buzek's denial that he collaborated can
be called into question and submitted to the lustration
court for further scrutiny. JM

CZECH, SLOVAK PARLIAMENTS GIVE GREEN LIGHT TO NATO. Both
houses of the Czech parliament voted overwhelmingly on
21 April to allow the Atlantic alliance to use Czech
airfields, roads, and rail facilities in conjunction
with its efforts in the Balkans. In Bratislava, the
Slovak government signed an agreement that will enable
NATO to use Slovakia's rail system. Foreign Minister
Eduard Kukan said that the alliance now has Bratislava's
permission to use "any Slovak means of transportation,"
AP reported. In Prague, Czech Foreign Minister Jan Kavan
said on 22 April that Czech media pay too much attention
to the suffering of the Serbs and not enough to that of
the Kosovars. Kavan suggested that this might help
explain why Czech public opinion is less than fully
supportive of NATO's policy in the Balkans, CTK
reported. PM

HUNGARY WILL NOT PARTICIPATE IN GROUND ATTACKS AGAINST
YUGOSLAVIA. Leaders of all six parliamentary parties in
Hungary agreed on 21 April that Budapest will not
participate in the possible launching of NATO ground
attacks on Yugoslavia, Hungarian media reported. Foreign
Minister Janos Martonyi said it is unlikely that any
decision taken at the forthcoming NATO summit would make
Hungary change its stand. Prime Minister Viktor Orban
told journalists that so far Hungary has received no
request to allow NATO trains carrying ammunition and
technical equipment to transit the country. MSZ

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

SOLANA: NATO TO STICK TO AIR CAMPAIGN... NATO Secretary-
General Javier Solana said in Brussels on 22 April that
the Atlantic alliance's "strategy [in the Balkans] is
not going to change" at the 50th anniversary summit in
Washington on 23 April. "The question of [introducing]
ground troops [in Kosova] will not be debated at all. No
decision will be taken at the summit. The strategy is
clear. It is the air campaign. It will continue to be
so," AP quoted him as saying. Asked about reports that
NATO is updating contingency plans for possible ground
troop deployment, Solana said that "all the options have
been contemplated several months ago and all the options
are kept updated." PM

...BUT WILL IT? Solana told the "Washington Post" of 21
April that it is necessary to show Yugoslav President
Slobodan Milosevic that "all options are on the table."
In London, "The Guardian" wrote that British Prime
Minister Tony Blair will seek to convince President Bill
Clinton at the summit that land forces should go to
Kosova "soon." In Washington, Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright and Defense Secretary William Cohen
said that NATO can update contingency plans to introduce
ground troops "very quickly." An unnamed White House
official told AP that NATO may soon reconsider its
earlier decision not to introduce ground troops. Other
unnamed U.S. officials added that Solana has asked NATO
commander General Wesley Clark to prepare plans for
sending in land forces. The BBC noted that "momentum is
building" in Washington and among the U.S. public at
large to introduce ground troops. In Ottawa, Prime
Minister Jean Chretien told Parliament that "if some day
we're confronted with the necessity to send some ground
troops, we'll do so." PM

FISCHER TO PUSH PEACE PLAN IN WASHINGTON. German Foreign
Minister Joschka Fischer recently discussed in Paris
developing a joint approach to Kosova with his British,
French, and Italian counterparts, the "Berliner Zeitung"
reported on 22 April. Fischer and his European
counterparts are determined to make Fischer's peace plan
"the basis" of joint NATO policy at the upcoming summit,
the Berlin daily continued. U.S. officials are skeptical
of certain aspects of the plan, including a halt in air
strikes as soon as Milosevic begins to withdraw his
forces from the province. Washington prefers to continue
the strikes until the withdrawal is complete or nearly
so. PM

MILOSEVIC TO DISRUPT NATO SUMMIT? Unnamed "senior NATO
sources" are concerned that Milosevic may seek to
disrupt the summit by accelerating the ethnic cleansing
of Kosova or by provoking a new crisis with Albania or
Montenegro, "The Daily Telegraph" reported on 22 April.
NATO officials also fear Milosevic might provoke
fighting in Bosnia or on the Montenegrin frontier with
Croatia. Elsewhere, Milosevic told a Texas radio station
by telephone that NATO is waging both "a military war
and a media war" against him. He denied that the
Kosovars are fleeing Serbian forces, arguing that they
are running from NATO air strikes. PM

NATO DESTROYS MILOSEVIC'S RESIDENCE. Milosevic's Tanjug
news agency reported on 22 April that a NATO air strike
destroyed the Serbian leader's home in Belgrade's
fashionable Dedinje district. Neither Milosevic nor his
family were in the residence at the time. This is the
latest in a series of attacks directed against property
or interests of the Serbian leader and people close to
him (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 21 April 1999). PM

SHEA: MOST KOSOVARS AWAY FROM HOME. NATO spokesman Jamie
Shea said in Brussels on 21 April that some 1,052,000
Kosovar remain in the province and that 850,000 of them
are internally displaced persons. He added that Serbian
forces are shelling positions of the Kosova Liberation
Army (UCK) west of Peja, where some 15,000 displaced
persons have taken shelter. Shea noted that several non-
NATO countries have sent medical or engineering units to
help NATO relief operations in Albania. They include
Latvia, Lithuania, Slovakia, Austria, Slovenia, and
Romania. PM

AIRLIFT OF SICK REFUGEES BEGINS. Ten NATO helicopters
evacuated about 90 refugees from the northern town of
Kukes to Burrel in central Albania on 21 April, an
RFE/RL correspondent reported from Tirana. The sick
refugees are in a critical condition. Evacuations also
continued by road, but there are still about 130,000
refugees in Kukes living in poor hygienic conditions and
often camping in the open. An OSCE spokesman in Tirana
said that only 150 refugees arrived in Kukes from Kosova
that day. At the Hani i Hotit border crossing near
Shkodra, however, 2,700 refugees entered Albania via
Montenegro, Reuters reported. It was the largest number
of refugees arriving from Montenegro on a single day so
far. Most came from Peja and Gjakova. Local authorities
in Shkodra said they are running out of supplies and
cannot accommodate more refugees in the area. FS

NATO DEPLOYS FORCES IN KUKES. NATO military equipment
arrived in Kukes on 21 April, mostly artillery pieces
and armored vehicles, to prepare for the arrival of
Apache helicopters from Tirana, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported from the capital. Albanian authorities have
expressed concern that following the deployment of the
Apaches, the northern mountains may become the scene of
more serious clashes with Yugoslav forces in coming
weeks and that the combat may pose a threat to the
remaining refugees there. Fighting in the region
continued on 21 April but at a lower intensity than the
previous day, when 200 Serbian soldiers entered Albania
and exchanged fire with Albanian forces, according to
NATO spokesman Giuseppe Marani. An OSCE spokesman,
however, told Reuters that four UCK fighters were killed
and 18 wounded in fighting along the border near Tropoja
on 21 April. FS

ALBANIAN PRESIDENT URGES 'MARSHALL PLAN.' Rexhep Meidani
told "Le Figaro" of 22 April that only extensive
financial aid can guarantee lasting peace in the Balkans
and contain nationalism, AP reported. He stressed that
"we absolutely need an international initiative, a
Marshall Plan for the Balkans." Meidani also accused
Yugoslav forces of trying to drag Albania into a war by
violating its borders. He added that "we don't want to
get into this game. But in the event of a major foray on
our territory, Albania will react vigorously." FS

UN: MACEDONIA LEAVES REFUGEES CUT OFF. Officials of the
UN's World Food Program said in Skopje on 22 April that
Macedonian authorities have denied aid workers access
for three days to some 6,000 Kosovars in the remote
mountain hamlet of Malina. A spokesman told Reuters that
"we are extremely worried about the plight of thousands
of refugees now stranded. We fear we could have a major
catastrophe on our hands. We can't wait any longer. We
have to get food in. We are looking at saving lives."
Another UN official added that "it's the same old story
as Bosnia. The higher authorities give us the nod but
police at the [local] checkpoint say 'no.'" Elsewhere,
the government admitted several thousand refugees who
had been stranded at the border. PM

GEORGIEVSKI: GLIGOROV EXAGGERATES DANGER. Macedonian
Prime Minister Ljubco Georgievski said in Skopje on 21
April that President Kiro Gligorov has "spread an
atmosphere of uncertainty" by calling recently for the
introduction of a state of emergency (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 21 April 1999). Georgievski, whose center-
right coalition government "cohabits" with the Social
Democratic president, charged that Gligorov spread fear
by publicly describing what the prime minister called
"fictitious situations" involving possible ethnic
conflict in Macedonia, AP reported. PM

TENSION CONTINUES AT PREVLAKA. On 21 April, the UN
monitoring mission in the demilitarized area between
Croatia and Montenegro protested the incursion by
Yugoslav forces into that zone (see "RFE/RL Newsline,"
21 April 1999). A UN spokesman said that some 20
soldiers remain at the border crossing. In Zagreb,
Foreign Minister Mate Granic noted that Croatia is
"carefully monitoring the situation" and is "fully
capable of defending its interests" if need be. Unnamed
military analysts told AP that Milosevic may be
attempting to provoke a coup in Montenegro by fomenting
tensions along the border. Unnamed Croatian officials
added that Croatia may respond to the Yugoslav army move
into the Montenegrin portion of the zone by sending its
own forces into the Croatian portion. PM

MONTENEGRO VOWS TO REOPEN BORDER. President Milo
Djukanovic told the "Financial Times" of 22 April that
"what we have here is a permanent attempt by Milosevic
to destabilize Montenegro and overthrow the government
by force." Djukanovic stressed that Montenegro will
control its own frontier. Deputy Prime Minister Dragisa
Burzan told Reuters in Podgorica the previous day that
the Yugoslav army roadblock on the Montenegrin-Croatian
frontier "will not last long because we will clear it."
He charged that the army is "trying step-by-step to
become a parallel authority in Montenegro." Elsewhere,
army troops arrested a French television team and a
journalist for the Croatian weekly "Globus." The troops
also expelled journalists from the Split weekly "Feral
Tribune," whom the Montenegrin authorities had admitted
to Montenegro, RFE/RL's South Slavic Service reported.
PM

STRIKES IN CROATIA. Staff at the Tisak press
distribution agency began a strike on 21 April to
protest mismanagement and increasing financial problems
facing the firm. The strike affects the nationwide
distribution of the dailies "Vecernji list," "Vjesnik,"
"Jutarnji list," and "Sportske Novosti." Elsewhere,
union and management representatives failed to reach an
agreement in Zagreb aimed at ending the ongoing railway
strike, RFE/RL's South Slavic Service reported. PM

ROMANIAN PARLIAMENT BACKS NATO AIRSPACE BID. The
parliament on 22 April voted by 225 to 21 with 99
abstentions to approve a request by NATO for unlimited
use of Romanian airspace in connection with the strikes
against Yugoslavia, Mediafax reported. Yugoslav
ambassador to Bucharest Desimir Jevtic had warned on the
eve of the vote that the decision to offer NATO such
access would constitute a flagrant violation of the
basic treaty between the two countries. Meanwhile, a
public opinion poll staged by the CURS shows that the
number of Romanians supporting their country's
membership in NATO has dropped from 67 percent in
December 1998 to 52 percent since the alliance bombings
began. Of the respondents, 84 percent said that the best
solution to the Yugoslav conflict would be to
immediately stop the war and return to the negotiating
table. ZsM

ROMANIA, IMF WRAP UP LOAN TALKS. The Romanian cabinet
and the IMF on 21 April reached a preliminary agreement
on a $500 million stand-by loan to help the country out
of its current economic crisis, RFE/RL's Bucharest
bureau reported. The accord came after weeks of
difficult talks. Romania's Finance Minister Decebal
Traian Remes said that his government agreed to an
annual inflation rate of up to 32 percent and a budget
deficit not exceeding 2.5 percent of GDP. According to
IMF chief negotiator Emanuel Zervoudakis, the IMF board
of directors will examine the agreement in June. Also on
21 April, Romanian Prime Minister Radu Vasile met with
trade union representatives and used the IMF accord as
an argument to persuade them to abandon plans for a
general strike beginning 26 April. The government-unions
negotiations lasted 10 hours. ZsM

MOLDOVA, RUSSIA SIGN AGREEMENTS. A Russian delegation
led by First Deputy Premier Vadim Gustov signed in
Chisinau on 21 April more than a dozen bilateral
agreements, an RFE/RL correspondent in the Moldovan
capital reported. The delegation attended a two-day
session of the Joint Inter-Governmental Committee for
Economic and Trade Cooperation. Among the signed
documents were a Program for Economic Cooperation from
1999-2008 and an agreement allowing Moldova to pay some
of its debt for Russian natural gas in food and
agricultural products. The two sides also agreed to
expedite the withdrawal of Russian military equipment
and ammunition from the Transdniester region. According
to Moldovan Premier Ion Sturza, the first 12 convoys are
expected to leave the region soon. Also on 21 April,
Moldovan President Petru Lucinschi left for Washington
to attend the NATO 50th anniversary celebrations. He is
accompanied by Foreign Minister Nicolae Tabacaru and
Defense Minister Valeriu Pasat. DI

BULGARIA TO ALLOW NATO LIMITED ACCESS TO AIR SPACE. On
returning to Sofia on 21 April after talks in Brussels
with senior NATO officials, Prime Minister Ivan Kostov
said Bulgaria will grant NATO aircraft access to a 70-90
mile (112-144 kilometer) band of airspace along its
western frontier with Yugoslavia and Macedonia, BTA
reported. That ruling must be endorsed by the
Constitutional Court and parliament, whose opposition
deputies walked out in protest on after the speaker
refused to schedule a debate on Kosova. AP quoted Kostov
as saying that NATO will give Bulgaria guarantees of its
security comparable to those granted Macedonia and
Albania. Kostov added that NATO Secretary-General Solana
had assured him NATO has no plans to deploy ground
troops in the conflict. LF

DONOR STATES PLEDGE ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FOR BULGARIA. In
Brussels, 22 donor states meeting with the World Bank
and other international institutions pledged $275
million in balance-of-payments support for Bulgaria, an
RFE/RL correspondent in Washington reported. Prime
Minister Kostov on 21 April estimated that as a result
of the Kosova conflict, Bulgaria's financial losses to
date total DM 25 million ($13.54 million), predicting
they could rise to more than $1 billion if the war
continues for seven or eight months, Reuters reported.
LF

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