The highest possible stage in moral culture is when we recognize that we ought to control our thoughts. - Charles Darwin
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 3, No. 50, Part II, 12 March 1999


________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 3, No. 50, Part II, 12 March 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and
Southeastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central
Asia prepared by the staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio
Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning
Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.  Part I
covers Russia, Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is
distributed simultaneously as a second document.  Back
issues of RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are
online at RFE/RL's Web site:
http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
NATO MARKS 50TH YEAR
Special reports from NATO's London conference as well as
coverage of the ceremony inducting Poland, Hungary, and
the Czech Republic into the military alliance are
available online:
http://www.rferl.org/nca/special/madrid-nato/index.html

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part II

* BELARUSIAN OPPOSITIONIST SAID TO HAVE BEEN TORTURED IN
JAIL

* CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, POLAND TO BECOME NATO MEMBERS

* RUSSIA'S IVANOV SIDES WITH BELGRADE ON NATO TROOPS IN
KOSOVA

End Note: UKRAINE'S INDEPENDENT MEDIA SUFFER MORE WOES
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

BELARUSIAN OPPOSITIONIST SAID TO HAVE BEEN TORTURED IN
JAIL. Viktar Hanchar, head of the opposition Central
Electoral Commission, was released on 11 March after 10
days in prison, during which he kept up a hunger strike
(see "RFE/RL Newsline," 9 March 1999). His wife told
RFE/RL's Belarusian Service that her husband was
tortured while in custody. She added that there is blood
in his urine and he "can barely speak." On the sixth day
of his hunger strike, Hanchar was tied up by jail
authorities and forced to take 400 grams of glucose.
When he was released, Hanchar was thrown out of a car
into snow some 2 kilometers from where he lives and had
to return home on foot. The authorities have charged him
with "usurping official duties," an offense that can
carry two years in prison or a penal labor colony. JM

BELARUSIAN GOVERNMENT AFFIRMS READINESS FOR 'DIALOGUE'
WITH OPPOSITION. The Belarusian Foreign Ministry has
issued a statement saying that the Belarusian government
"is ready for a dialogue with the opposition and
interested international organizations," Belarusian
Television reported on 11 March. The statement came as a
response to an OSCE appeal to seek dialogue and abstain
from confrontation in Belarus. The Foreign Ministry
added that the dialogue should be continued on the basis
of the "existing constitution," which stipulates that
presidential elections in Belarus are to be held in
2001. The Belarusian opposition does not recognize that
constitution, adopted in the 1996 controversial
referendum, and has scheduled presidential elections for
16 May, in accordance with the constitution promulgated
in 1994. JM

LUKASHENKA FIRES MAHILEU OBLAST GOVERNOR. "You are not a
governor from this moment, good bye, you are free to
go," Belarusian President Alyaksandr Lukashenka told
Alyaksandr Kulichkou in a televised government meeting
on 11 March. "We have nothing to talk about, you have
betrayed my trust, you have disgraced me in my native
Mahileu Oblast," Lukashenka added. The president has
accused Kulichkou of tolerating economic offenses in his
region. JM

POLL SHOWS 39 PERCENT 'CRYSTALLIZED' SUPPORT FOR
LUKASHENKA. A poll taken in January and February by the
Novak Sociological Laboratory shows President Lukashenka
has 39 percent backing, while support for any of his
political opponents does not exceed 3 percent. At the
same time, 78 percent of respondents said that the
economic situation worsened in January, compared with
the previous month. Novak director Andrey Vardamatski
commented that Belarus has a "crystallized electorate
that will vote for Lukashenka as a person regardless of
whatever takes place in the economy." JM

UKRAINIAN GOVERNMENT RAISES ELECTRICITY, GAS RATES. The
National Commission for Electricity Regulation on 10
March ordered that beginning 1 April the prices of
electricity and gas be increased by 20 percent and 25
percent, respectively. Meanwhile, the Ukrainian Trade
Union Federation has said some 70 percent of the
country's population will not be able to pay the new
rates on a regular basis. Deputy Economy Minister Viktor
Kalnyk predicted on 11 March that tariffs for utility
payments--including rent, heat, and water supplies--will
be increased by 25-30 percent. JM

ESTONIAN RIGHT-WING ALLIANCE TO NAME CABINET WITHIN
WEEK. The Reform Party, the Fatherland Union, and the
Moderates have begun official talks on forming a new
government, ETA and BNS reported on 11 March. A
spokesman for the Moderates said after the talks that
the three parties hope to reach agreement on the
distribution of portfolios next week. With regard to the
possible inclusion of the Coalition Party in the
alliance, the spokesman said that the three parties are
agreed that their current parliamentary majority of 53
members is "too risky." The Coalition Party won seven
seats in the 7 March elections. JC

LOSSES OF ESTONIAN BANKING SECTOR EXCEEDED $43 MILLION
LAST YEAR. The total losses of the Estonian banking
sector last year, excluding those banks that were closed
down, exceeded 600 million kroons (some $43 million),
ETA reported on 11 March, citing data released by
Hansapank. Uhispank suffered the biggest loss, 383.4
million kroons (compared with a 211 million kroons
profit in 1997) owing to the crisis on world financial
markets and the collapse of the Russian economy. Optiva
Pank, created as a result of the merger of Eesti
Forekspank and Eesti Investeerimispank, registered
unaudited losses totaling 255.9 million kroons, mainly
owing to bad short- and long-term securities
investments. JC

LATVIAN PARLIAMENT REJECTS ALLOWING NON-CITIZENS TO FORM
POLITICIAL PARTIES. Lawmakers on 11 March voted down a
proposal by the For Human Rights in a United Latvia
parliamentary group that would have allowed non-citizens
who are permanent residents of the country to form
political parties. The same day, Russian Foreign
Minister Vladimir Rakhmanin positively evaluated the
Latvian government's initiative to put the issue of the
integration of society to a public debate (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 11 March 1999). "We hope that the Latvian
government will implement in practice its readiness to
launch a broad debate and will take into full
consideration the opinions of all ethnic minorities
residing in Latvia as well as basic pan-European
standards," BNS quoted him as saying. JC

CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY, POLAND TO BECOME NATO
MEMBERS... The foreign ministers of the Czech Republic,
Hungary, and Poland will hand U.S. Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright their countries' "protocols of
accession" to NATO on 12 March. The joining ceremony
will take place at the Truman Library in Independence,
Missouri. Once Albright accepts the protocols, the three
countries are immediately considered official NATO
members. Their air defense systems will be included into
that of the alliance. Originally, it had been planned
that the three would join NATO at the April summit in
Washington celebrating the 50 anniversary of the
alliance. But according to the U.S. State Department,
all three countries pressed to join NATO before that
summit in order to participate in it as full members. JM

...HAIL NATO ENTRY AS HISTORIC EVENT. "We will make sure
that freedom and democracy become common values of all
members of the community that is called NATO," Polish
Premier Jerzy Buzek said in a nationwide address on
Polish Television on 11 March. "I think we can now say
that in the next years and decades Hungary will enjoy a
level of security it has never enjoyed before,"
Hungarian Foreign Minister Janos Martonyi said before
leaving to attend the ceremony in Independence. And
Czech President Vaclav Havel on 12 March hailed the
entry of his country into NATO as one of the most
important moments in Czech history. JM

CZECH PREMIER FAVORS TEMELIN COMPLETION. Milos Zeman
told journalists on 11 March that while he favors
completing the construction of the controversial Temelin
nuclear plant, the government as a whole will decide on
the matter later this month. He noted that his vote in
the cabinet "weighs the same as that of any other of its
members." Zeman said a report recently submitted by a
government commission on the completion of the plant
does not present the cabinet with a recommendation "one
way or the other" (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 9 March 1999).
MS

FORMER SLOVAK INTERIOR MINISTER COMPLAINS OF POLICE
BIAS. Gustav Krajci, who is under investigation for his
role in hindering the 1997 referendum on accession to
NATO and direct presidential elections, told journalists
on 11 March that the police investigator examining his
case is "biased," CTK reported. He also contested the
investigation's legality on the grounds that the
Constitutional Court has yet to rule on the validity of
Premier Mikulas Dzurinda's decision to annul the amnesty
granted to those involved in hindering the referendum by
his predecessor, Vladimir Meciar. Former Slovak Counter-
Intelligence chief Ivan Lexa complained that two
policemen tried to seize his personal notebook in the
parliament building, which he called a "clear case of
power abuse." The parliament is to decide whether to
strip Lexa of his immunity for his alleged involvement
in the 1995 kidnapping of former President Michal
Kovac's son. MS

ITALIAN PRIME MINISTER IN HUNGARY, CZECH REPUBLIC.
Massimo D'Alema told journalists in Budapest on 11 March
that Italy is not preparing to tighten visa requirements
for Hungarians. He said problems that resulted from
changes to the Schengen agreement have been dealt with,
and Hungarians will be able to enter Italy with their
identity cards only once those cards conform with EU
standards. Prime Minister Viktor Orban said both Rome
and Budapest agree that NATO must maintain its "open-
door" policy. Italy sees Slovenia and Romania as new
member candidates, while Hungary argues in favor of
Slovakia's admission. Also on 11 March, D'Alema and
Czech Premier Milos Zeman discussed in Prague how to
boost Italian investments in the Czech Republic as well
as cooperation in fighting organized crime, corruption,
and economic crime. MSZ/MS

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

RUSSIA'S IVANOV SIDES WITH BELGRADE ON NATO TROOPS IN
KOSOVA. Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov said on 11
March that any international military force in Kosova
should first be approved by Belgrade, dpa reported.
Ivanov, who was in Tirana for talks with government
officials, made it clear that Moscow sees the political
and military portions of the Rambouillet peace agreement
as separate issues--as does Belgrade. "The political
document should be signed," he said. "But the way the
implementation of the agreement will be enforced is
another problem." Ivanov met with Premier Pandeli Majko
and his Albanian counterpart, Paskal Milo, as well as
with President Rexhep Mejdani before leaving for
Belgrade for talks with Yugoslav President Slobodan
Milosevic. PB

UCK SEEMS AGREEABLE TO SIGNING ACCORD. The Kosova
Liberation Army (UCK) gave equivocal support to the
Rambouillet peace agreement on 12 March, AP reported. In
a statement released after a meeting of top UCK
officials--including political leader Hashim Thaqi--in
the Drenica region of Kosova, the UCK said the plan "was
not the solution that we would want the most. But it
does not close all doors to future roads." The statement
went on to say that "the future of Kosova depends mostly
on the [ethnic] Albanians themselves and their
cooperation with the international community." Thaqi
reportedly urged "all political forces" to accept the
plan. The previous day, Kosovar journalist Veton Surroi,
who was also a member of the Albanian side at
Rambouillet, said "if we don't sign the agreement we
will be isolated from the world and our future will
resemble [that of] the Kurdish people." Kosova Albanian
leader Ibrahim Rugova stressed his support for the peace
plan, saying "we'll go to Paris to sign because there is
no more time to negotiate." PB

NATO SUPREME COMMANDER WARNS OF 'DEVASTATING STRIKES.'
U.S. General Wesley Clark said on 12 March in London
that NATO has a "vast air armada" ready to make a
"devastating series of strikes" against Serbian targets,
Reuters reported. Clark, who later flew to France for
talks with government officials, said Yugoslav President
Milosevic will not be allowed to "smash the civilian
populace and their villages in Kosova." He said the NATO
strikes will begin if Belgrade continues to block the
peace accord. PB

UN REFUGEE AGENCY SAYS SOME 4,000 KOSOVARS MISSING. The
UNHCR said on 12 March that up to 4,000 ethnic Albanians
are unaccounted for after fleeing fighting near their
villages in southern Kosova, Reuters reported. UNHCR
spokeswoman Paula Ghedini said between 800 and 1,000
people from each of the villages of Ivaja, Straza, Ljoc,
and Pustenik have fled but have not arrived in nearby
towns. She said abandoned camp sites have been found,
adding that she believes that the people are hiding in
the forests from Serbian forces. Macedonian Radio
reported on 11 March that 1,200 Kosovars fled to
Macedonia in the past two days. The UN high commissioner
for refugees, Sadako Ogata, said in Washington that
30,000 people have been displaced in Kosova since the
end of the Rambouillet peace talks. Meanwhile, fighting
between Serbian security forces and the UCK erupted in
southwestern Kosova after a respite of several months.
Fierce fighting continued north of the capital,
Prishtina, and in the south. PB

POPLASEN THREATENS VIOLENCE IF ATTEMPT IS MADE TO REMOVE
HIM. The sacked president of Republika Srpska, Nikola
Poplasen, vowed on 11 March to stay in office and
threatened violence against Western officials if they
press on with efforts to remove him, AP reported.
Poplasen said, "We are ready with a different kind of
defense if democratic principles are not applied. [It]
will include other arguments: sticks, stones, arms, and
tanks." U.S. Balkan envoy Robert Gelbard said
"unfortunately we have a very sad history with
terrorists like Mr. Poplasen." Gelbard said Poplasen
would be held "personally responsible" for any attacks
on U.S. citizens. Simon Haselock, the spokesman for
Carlos Westendorp, the high representative for Bosnia,
said "we consider [Poplasen] to be taking a little extra
time to clear his desk, which is why he is still in
office." Both Bosnian Serb Premier Milorad Dodik and
Zivko Radisic, the Bosnian Serb chairman of Bosnia's
presidency, condemned Poplasen's statements. PB

CROATIA TO RESTORE MEMORIAL AT CONCENTRATION CAMP. The
Croatian government has said it will restore a memorial
at Jasenovac, the country's infamous concentration camp
where tens of thousands of people were killed during
World War II, AP reported on 10 March. Premier Zlatko
Matesa said during a visit to the site that the decision
was "a policy of reconciliation." He said the events
that took place at Jasenovac can "never be allowed to be
repeated." The memorial was destroyed and the museum
there looted by Serbs fleeing a Croat offensive in 1995.
Jasenovac was one of 20 concentration camps run by the
pro-Axis Ustasha regime during World War II. PB

ALBANIAN CENTRAL BANK TO TIGHTEN BANK REQUIREMENTS. The
Central Bank said on 11 March that it will increase
supervision over financial institutions in an effort to
prevent a repeat of the fraudulent pyramid schemes that
led the country into chaos in 1997, Reuters reported.
The bank said that it will seek new legislation
regulating financial operators and that the minimum
starting capital for banks will be increased from $5
million to $7 million. Pension and investment funds will
also be required to have larger starting capital. PB

BALKAN 'TROIKA' AGREE ON FREE TRADE ZONE. The presidents
of Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey, meeting in Sinaia on 11
March, agreed that their countries will set up a free
trade zone by 2000, RFE/RL's Bucharest Bureau reported.
In a joint declaration released on 12 March, Emil
Constantinescu, Petar Stoyanov and Suleyman Demirel
called on Serbs and Albanians to stop fighting and reach
a settlement. They said they support ending the conflict
through an agreement, noting that NATO's enlargement to
southeastern Europe could contribute to stability in the
region. On 11 March, Greek Foreign Minister George
Papandreou, after meeting with Romanian Foreign Minister
Andrei Plesu, told journalists that an inter-Balkan
conference on Kosova should be convened in Bucharest or
Skopje before the next round of Kosova peace talks
begins on 15 March in France. Romanian Radio on 12 March
quoted Plesu as saying that Belgrade has "reservations"
about a Bucharest conference. MS

ROMANIAN PARLIAMENT CALLS ON NATO TO CONTINUE EXPANSION.
In a resolution passed ahead of the NATO April
Washington summit, the two chambers of the Romanian
parliament on 11 March called on their parliamentary
colleagues from NATO countries to support the continued
enlargement of NATO. In other news, the Romanian
government and France's Renault have signed a
preliminary agreement for the sale of the Dacia car
maker to the French company, RFE/RL's Bucharest bureau
reported on 11 March. MS

MOLDOVAN PARLIAMENT AGAIN VOTES CONFIDENCE IN STURDZA
CABINET. The parliament on 12 March voted confidence in
Ion Sturdza's cabinet, but the 52 majority was obtained
through the absentee ballot of deputy Ilie Ilascu, who
is imprisoned in Tiraspol, Romanian Radio reported.
Observers say this may lead to a challenge over the
legality of the vote in the Constitutional Court. The
nine deputies representing the Christian Democratic
Popular Front again boycotted the vote, their demand for
four ministers having been rejected in the negotiations
the previous day within the Alliance for Democracy and
Reform parliamentary majority. MS

BULGARIAN PRESIDENT QUALIFIES KOSTOV'S REMARKS. Petar
Stoyanov on 11 March said that one "must not conclude
from the [1 March] interview of Premier Ivan Kostov that
Bulgaria is reconsidering its strategy for integration
into the EU or that poverty in Bulgaria is caused by a
lack of sympathy from the rich West," Reuters reported.
Stoyanov added that responsibility for Bulgaria's
poverty rests with "the Communist Party, which brought
us to this plight." Reuters said the statement is a move
to ease tensions between Sofia and the EU sparked by
Kostov's sharp criticism of the union in an interview
with the agency at the beginning of this month (see
"RFE/RL Newsline," 2 March 1999). MS

BULGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTER ON NATO MEMBERSHIP. Foreign
Minister Nadezhda Mihailova told a NATO-sponsored
seminar in Borovets on 11 March that her country
deserves NATO membership because of its cooperation with
the alliance over Kosova and its need for protection
against threats posed by the conflict in that region,
Reuters reported. Mihailova said the Kosova conflict
threatens to spill over to other parts of the region.
She added that Bulgaria also faces an influx of refugees
and increased organized crime and arms trafficking. MS

END NOTE

UKRAINE'S INDEPENDENT MEDIA SUFFER MORE WOES

By Lily Hyde

	Ukraine's non-government media have suffered a
series of recent setbacks that have further reduced the
dwindling number of independent media outlets in the
country.
	Late last month, the trouble-plagued opposition
daily "Kievskie Vedomosti" suspended publication after
it ran out of money. Another opposition newspaper,
"Polityka," announced that the state printing press was
refusing to publish it, despite a court ruling in the
newspaper's favor. And the state broadcasting company
temporarily silenced a private TV channel, while another
private TV channel claims it is being harassed and
intimidated.
	These four cases are the latest chapters in a saga
of political and financial problems encountered by
independent media in Ukraine.
	'KIEVSKIE VEDOMOSTI': According to Dmytro
Chekalkin, president of the broadcasting arm of the
Kievskie Vedomosti media company, the newspaper does not
have the financial resources to continue publishing. The
newspaper's deputy editor-in-chief, Irina Titova, said
staff wages have not been paid for the last four months
of publication and working conditions have become
intolerable, as staff have access only to three phone
lines, four computers, and no news wire service or
Internet access.
	"Kievskie Vedomosti" has been dogged by previous
misfortunes, most of which it claims were due to
political persecution for its oppositionist editorial
content. Chekalkin said a general decline in advertising
and unfair competition were major factors in the
newspaper's demise. Other Ukrainian newspapers, he
noted, are subsidized by companies close to the
presidential administration and the current government
and sell for only 5 or 6 kopecks (less than 2 U.S.
cents) per issue.
	Titova said the editorial staff decided to suspend
publication in an attempt to attract attention to the
newspaper's plight. She said the newspaper wants its
shareholders to pay attention to its problems. The
newspaper's major shareholders are the Ukrainian
companies Dendi, Dovira, Ukrrichflot, and Pryvatbank.
	'POLITYKA': The same week that "Kievskie
Vedomosti" stopped publishing, "Polityka" announced that
the printing house Pressa Ukrainy was refusing to resume
printing the Kyiv-based weekly.
	Last November, the state printing house received a
Pechersk district court order banning it from printing
"Polityka." A Kyiv city court decision early last month
reversed that ruling.
	Editor-in-chief Oleh Lyashko said the newspaper
has paid Pressa Ukrainy an advance of 28,000 hryvna
(about $7,200) and provided it with 25 tons of paper.
Lyashko said repeated letters and visits failed to
extract any explanation from Pressa Ukrainy: "From
February 8 we have all legal right to put out the
newspaper, but unfortunately to date the newspaper
hasn't been issued [by Pressa Ukrainy]. Why? Because
Pressa Ukrainy, with which we have worked for three
years, now refuses to renew the contract with the
newspaper for 1999 and has given absolutely no
explanation for that refusal."
	While Lyashko believes the presidential
administration is behind the move, an unnamed Pressa
Ukrainy spokesman said the company's decision was
motivated by the newspaper's financial unreliability.
Last year, the spokesman said "Polityka" twice broke its
contract by stopping publication.
	In the meantime,. "Polityka" is due to restart
publication this week under a new agreement reached with
another publishing house.
	NART: On the same day that "Kievskie Vedomosti"
suspended publication, the private TV channel National
Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters (NART)
was taken off the air because--its owners claim--of its
independent political stance. Volodymyr Tsendrovskyy,
president of the Ukrainian TV Union and a founder of
NART, predicted that this will be only the first in a
chain of private channels to be taken off the air. He
called it a "rehearsal for political censorship and
economic dictatorship in the Ukrainian TV market."
	Tsendrovskyy admitted that NART owes 160,000
hryvna (about 41,000 dollars) to the Ukrainian Radio and
Television Broadcasting concern, the state company that
controls Ukraine's airwaves. But he argued that the
figure is insignificant compared with the debts of many
other broadcasting companies, such as the state-run
Television and radio channels, which he said owe the
state broadcasters 62 million hryvna.
	NART resumed broadcasting on 23 February after
reaching an agreement on paying off its debt. But NART
officials still maintain they are victims of political
harassment since no other broadcasters owing debts have
been taken off the air, even temporarily.
	STB: The private television network STB issued a
statement last week to President Leonid Kuchma, saying
its executives have been attacked or threatened and
requesting the government to increase protection.
	An STB official said in the most recent incident,
armed attackers broke into the Kyiv apartment of STB's
commercial director and forced the man and his pregnant
wife to the floor at gunpoint. In searching the
apartment, the gunmen ignored money and valuables,
apparently looking for documents. Several days earlier,
the station official said, an STB cameraman was robbed
of his camera and cassettes by unidentified attackers.
	The official says harassment intensified after the
network broadcast investigative reports about illegal
deals in Ukraine's lucrative industries that allegedly
involve powerful business groups close to the
government.

The author is Kyiv-based contributor to RFE/RL.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1999 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
listmanager@list.rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 23 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour
LIVE Broadcast Studio.
http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble
via email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Bruce Pannier, PannierB@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Pete Baumgartner, Dan Ionescu, Zsolt-Istvan Mato,
Jolyon Naegele, Fabian Schmidt, Matyas Szabo, Anthony
Wesolowsky

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole