The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. - Plutarch
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 3, No. 20, Part II, 29 January 1999


________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 3, No. 20, Part II, 29 January 1999

A daily report of developments in Eastern and
Southeastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central
Asia prepared by the staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio
Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning
Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.  Part I
covers Russia, Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is
distributed simultaneously as a second document.  Back
issues of RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are
online at RFE/RL's Web site:
http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part II

* POLISH GOVERNMENT YIELDS TO FARMERS' DEMANDS

* SLOVAK GOVERNMENT APPROVES REFORM PLAN

* CONTACT GROUP PREPARES ULTIMATUM

End Note: THE CORRUPTION INVESTIGATION INTO LAZARENKO
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

UKRAINE'S MEMBERSHIP IN COUNCIL OF EUROPE'S ASSEMBLY
THREATENED. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of
Europe has said it will suspend Ukraine's membership
unless it "takes steps toward meeting its commitments,"
Reuters and Ukrainian Television reported on 28 January.
Two days earlier, the assembly had threatened to suspend
Ukraine unless it fully meets its commitments before the
June 1999 PACE session. It has criticized Ukraine
primarily for failing to abolish the death penalty.
Under a presidential moratorium, there have been no
executions in Ukraine since March 1997, although courts
continue to pass death sentences. The assembly is
demanding that Ukrainian lawmakers adopt the moratorium
as law. But lawmakers are resisting such a move, arguing
that up to 80 percent of the population are opposed to
banning the death penalty. JM

UKRAINE 'DISAPPOINTED' BY NON-RATIFICATION OF TREATY
WITH RUSSIA. The Ukrainian Foreign Ministry on 28
January issued a statement saying that Kyiv is
"disappointed" by the decision of Russia's Federation
Council to postpone the ratification of the Ukrainian-
Russian Treaty (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 28 January 1999).
The ministry argued that the treaty is an "indicator" of
good-neighborly and equal relations. It added that it
hopes the Federation Council will ratify the treaty "in
the near future." JM

KUCHMA CONTINUES RESHUFFLING CABINET. Ukrainian
President Leonid Kuchma has appointed Andriy Honcharuk
as minister for foreign economic relations and Raisa
Bohatyryova as health minister. Until now, both served
as deputy ministers. The appointments follow a cabinet
shakeup earlier this month in which Kuchma fired First
Deputy Prime Minister Anatoliy Holubchenko, three
ministers, and four deputy ministers. Holubchenko on 28
January was appointed first deputy chairman of the State
Property Fund, a government agency dealing with
privatization of state assets. JM

TKACHENKO SAYS UKRAINE MAY JOIN BELARUS-RUSSIA UNION.
Ukrainian parliamentary speaker Oleksandr Tkachenko met
with Belarusian President Alyaksandr Lukashenka in Minsk
on 28 January and addressed the Chamber of
Representatives, the lower legislative house. "Belarus
serves as an example of how to preserve the best of what
[previously existed]...and exerted positive influence on
[Belarus's] development," Interfax quoted Tkachenko as
saying. Tkachenko told journalists later that Ukraine
may soon join the Belarusian-Russian union. He added
that in the meantime the three Slavic states must build
common economic and customs systems. JM

BELARUS PLANS 1999 BUDGET DEFICIT AT 1.8 PERCENT. The
Chamber of Representatives on 28 January adopted
Belarus's 1999 draft budget in the first reading,
Belapan reported. The budget deficit is planned at 1.8
percent of GDP. The government will use primarily
domestic sources to finance the deficit, in particular
National Bank loans and revenues from treasury bills.
Budget revenues total 416 trillion Belarusian rubles
($3.1 billion, according to the official exchange rate).
GDP is predicted to grow by 3-5 percent. Finance
Minister Mikalay Korbut told the legislature that annual
inflation is expected to reach 190-205 percent, while
the average U.S. dollar exchange rate is forecast at
230,000 Belarusian rubles. JM

ESTONIAN PARLIAMENT REJECTS EESTI TELEKOM BILL.
Lawmakers on 28 January voted by 24 to 14 in favor of
removing from the agenda a bill urging that
privatization plans for Eesti Telekom be revised, ETA
reported. The draft law would have classified Eesti
Telekom as a strategic company, meaning that the state
would have retained a 51 percent share. Under the
current plans, the state will have a 27.3 percent stake
and the Finnish and Swedish concerns Sonera and Telia 49
percent, while the remaining 23.7 percent of shares are
currently on offer to private investors (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 25 and 27 January 1999). JC

ESTONIAN PREMIER CONFIRMS INTERIOR MINISTER'S
RESIGNATION. Mart Siimann on 28 January confirmed that
Interior Minister Olari Taal handed in his resignation
10 days earlier, ETA reported. Both have declined to
comment on the reasons for the resignation, but
according to press reports, the two men are engaged in a
dispute over the appointment of a new chancellor to the
Interior Ministry. JC

LATVIA'S 1999 BUDGET PASSES IN FIRST READING. Lawmakers
have voted by 56 to 37 with no abstentions to pass this
year's draft budget in the first reading, LETA reported
on 28 January. The Social Democrats, who earlier had
opposed the bill's provision for defense expenditures
equaling 0.9 percent of GDP, all voted in favor, with
the exception of one member of the party's caucus,
"Diena" reported the next day. The "no" votes were cast
by the rightist People's Party of former Premier Andris
Skele and the leftist bloc For Human Rights in a United
Latvia. Under Latvian law, the budget is subject to two
readings only. The parliament also approved Raimonds
Graube as commander of the national armed forces. He
replaces Juris Eihmanis, who was fired last fall over a
housing scandal. JC

LITHUANIAN PREMIER DECLARES WAR ON ORGANIZED CRIME.
Gediminas Vagnorius has declared war on organized
criminal groups in the wake of the murder earlier this
week of the chief prosecutor in the northern town of
Panevezys (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 27 January 1999), ELTA
and BNS reported on 29 January. Vagnorius told
journalists that beginning this year, special task
forces will be set up within organized crime
investigation departments. He noted that the government
will boost efforts to pass laws making it easier to
arrest and convict organized crime bosses. And he
promised that government spending on law enforcement
will be increased. JC

NATO LEADER APPLAUDS LITHUANIAN DEFENSE BUDGET.
Receiving Lithuanian President Valdas Adamkus at NATO
headquarters in Brussels, Supreme Commander of Allied
Forces in Europe General Wesley Clark praised a law
recently passed by the Lithuanian parliament providing
for defense expenditures to total 1.95-2 percent of GDP
by 2001 (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 11 and 15 January 1999).
ELTA reported that Clark was "optimistic" about
Lithuania's chances of gaining entry to NATO, while
pointing to the need to raise professional standards
among Lithuanian officers and step up cooperation with
NATO units. JC

POLISH GOVERNMENT YIELDS TO FARMERS' DEMANDS.
Agricultural Minister Jacek Janiszewski on 28 January
announced that the cabinet next week will introduce
intervention prices for Polish pork at 2.8 zlotys
($0.78) per kilogram, up from 1.8 zlotys, Polish media
reported. In a related move, Finance Minister Leszek
Balcerowicz asked the parliament's upper house to amend
the 1999 budget to allocate 275 million zlotys to the
State Agency for Agricultural Market to subsidize those
purchases. Yielding still further to the demands of the
farmers (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 28 January 1999), the
government held talks with radical farmers' leader
Andrzej Lepper. Lepper told journalists later that the
government is not prepared to meet his demands, and he
threatened to continue blocking roads until the
government complies. In addition to higher prices for
agricultural produce, Lepper demands that the
authorities renounce their intention to punish farmers
for erecting road blockades. JM

CZECH CATHOLIC CHURCH REFUSES TO SIT ON COMMISSION WITH
COMMUNIST. The Czech Catholic Church on 28 January said
it will not participate in a government commission on
Church-state relations because of Communist Party
participation in that body, CTK reported. Daniel Herman,
the spokesman for the Catholic Church's Czech Bishops'
Conference, said it decided unanimously not to take part
because of the "participation of Communists." Communist
deputy Dalibor Matulka was named to the commission by
the Social Democratic government earlier that day.
Herman said it is "impossible" to hold talks with a
party "which is a criminal organization in its essence
and which bears full responsibility for one of the most
brutal forms of persecution of Churches and religious
organizations in Europe in the 20th century." He said
the Catholics will discuss the composition of the
commission with the government in the next few days. PB

CZECH REPUBLIC READY FOR EU BY 2003? Czech Foreign
Minister Jan Kavan said at a meeting in London with his
British counterpart, Robin Cook, that the Czech Republic
will fulfill EU entry criteria by 2003, CTK reported on
28 January. Kavan said he and Cook also discussed the
Kosova crisis and the Charter of Basic Rights in Europe.
The previous day, in an interview with the "Prager
Zeitung," Kavan said that Czech-German relations are
"very good" and "better than ever before." He said the
election in both countries of Social Democratic
governments "has sharply improved the atmosphere." PB

SLOVAK GOVERNMENT APPROVES REFORM PLAN... The government
has approved a plan designed to stabilize the economy
and enhance foreign investment, AP reported on 28
January. The plan, which must be approved by the
parliament, includes changes in commercial, civil, and
criminal codes aimed at making the economic climate more
transparent and efficient. It also stipulates that
foreign investors be treated the same way as Slovak
citizens in the privatization process. Finally, the plan
requires the Finance, Economy, Agriculture, Transport,
and Telecommunications Ministries to carry out audits on
state-owned monopolies by June. PB

ŠAND PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION PROCEDURES. The Slovak
government has approved a draft bill that regulates the
procedures of direct presidential elections, CTK
reported on 27 January. The legislation, which also
requires passage in the parliament, sets limits on the
length of election campaigns and regulates candidates'
airtime on television. On 14 January, the parliament
passed a bill amending the constitution to allow for the
direct election of the president. Slovakia has been
without a president since last March. Former President
Michal Kovac, Kosice Mayor Rudolf Schuster, and Slovak
Democratic Coalition deputy Juraj Svec are the only
confirmed candidates so far. PB

HUNGARY PROTESTS CZECH COMPLAINT TO WORLD TRADE
ORGANIZATION. Budapest says it is upset by a complaint
filed by the Czech Republic to the World Trade
Organization (WTO) over a quota on Czech steel imports,
the "Financial Times" reported on 28 January. Budapest
said it imposed the quota after the Czechs restricted
Hungarian wheat imports. The two governments have 60
days in which to resolve the dispute before it would go
to a WTO disputes panel. PB

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

NATO ISSUES 'FINAL WARNING' TO SERBS, KOSOVARS. NATO
Secretary-General Javier Solana said in Brussels on 28
January that "the appropriate authorities in Belgrade
and representatives of the [Kosovar] leadership must
agree to the proposals to be issued by the
[international] Contact Group for completing an interim
political settlement within the time frame to be
established." He added that the foreign ministers of the
six Contact Group countries--the U.S., U.K., Germany,
France, Italy and Russia--will issue a "political
ultimatum" to the Serbs and Kosovars at a meeting in
London on 29 January. One day later, NATO ambassadors in
Brussels will discuss what the alliance will do next.
German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer told Deutsche
Welle that the Serbs and Kosovars must comply with the
ultimatum "within one week." If the Serbs do not comply,
NATO is expected to launch air strikes. If the Kosovars
do not agree, the alliance is expected to intercept
their arms supplies that arrive via Albania. PM

CONTACT GROUP PREPARES ULTIMATUM. British Foreign
Secretary Robin Cook told the BBC on 29 January that
"the objective of today's meeting [of the Contact Group]
is to summon both sides together and to do it on a tight
deadline, saying 'We want you to meet next week, we want
you to conclude [an interim political settlement] very
shortly after that.'" Observers noted that the U.S. has
agreed to the Contact Group's taking the lead in
pursuing a settlement that gives a greater role to
France, Russia and other European powers resentful of
the preeminence of U.S. diplomacy in the former
Yugoslavia. PM

WHAT KIND OF SETTLEMENT WILL CONTACT GROUP PROPOSE? The
Contact Group is expected to call for "proximity peace
talks" in Paris or Geneva on the model of the Dayton
talks, which ended the war in Bosnia in 1995. Under that
model, international diplomats would shuttle between
Serbian and Kosovar delegations seated in different
rooms. The two delegations would not meet together
formally until an agreement was ready. The Contact Group
is likely to call for broad autonomy for Kosova within
the frontiers of Serbia and Yugoslavia. Belgrade,
however, would retain little authority in the province
other than for defense and customs. The ethnic
composition of the local police forces would reflect the
ethnic makeup of the local population. The settlement
would last for three years, after which a permanent
solution would be sought. PM

BLAIR, CHIRAC OFFER GROUND TROOPS. British Prime
Minister Tony Blair and French President Jacques Chirac
said in London on 28 January that they are "ready to
envisage, along with their core NATO partners, any
military action, including sending ground troops
necessary to accompany the implementation of a
negotiated settlement" in Kosova. Germany and, to a
lesser extent, Italy have previously said they will
provide ground troops if asked. In Washington, President
Bill Clinton's national security spokesman noted on 28
January that the U.S. "would not deploy ground troops in
a hostile environmentŠbut in the event of a settlement,
we will consider U.S. participation in full consultation
with Congress and our allies." Euronews Television
reported on 29 January that NATO may send the troops
already in Macedonia into Kosova in the event that a
settlement emerges. The broadcast added that Serbian
officials have warned of "dangerous consequences" should
foreign ground troops enter the province. PM

SERBS, KOSOVARS COOL ON TALKS. Serbian Deputy Prime
Ministers Vojislav Seselj, Ratko Markovic and Milovan
Bojic said in Belgrade on 28 January that the Serbian
government is willing to hold direct talks with Kosovar
representatives but will not attend an international
conference on Kosova, RFE/RL's South Slavic Service
reported. In Ljubljana, Adem Demaci, who is the
political representative of the Kosova Liberation Army
(UCK), said the UCK is opposed to talks as long as
Serbian forces continue to attack Kosovars. PM

BULATOVIC GOVERNMENT SLAMS MONTENEGRO. The Yugoslav
federal government, which is headed by Montenegrin
opposition leader Momir Bulatovic, said in a statement
on 28 January that the Montenegrin government's recent
agreement with Croatia on opening border crossings is
"unconstitutional, illegal, and harmful to the interests
ofŠYugoslavia," RFE/RL's South Slavic Service reported
(see "RFE/RL Newsline," 28 January 1999). In a veiled
warning to Croatia, the statement added that the
agreement "is against international law and the
principles of cooperation between internationally
recognized and sovereign states." PM

COUNCIL OF EUROPE REPRIMANDS CROATIA. The Council of
Europe's Monitoring Committee passed a resolution in
Strasbourg on 28 January saying that the Croatian
government "has not accepted a single one" of the
Council's recommendations in favor of restricting the
voting rights of Croats living abroad. Croatian law
allows ethnic Croats living or born in Bosnia-
Herzegovina to receive Croatian passports and to vote.
Domestic and foreign critics say that such legislation
undermines the sovereignty of Bosnia-Herzegovina. They
also note that it ensures a large bloc of nationalist
votes from Herzegovina for President Franjo Tudjman's
Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ). PM

CROATIAN NEWSPAPERS COLLECT DEBTS. Officials of the pro-
HDZ "Tisak" company, which has a monopoly on the
distribution of newspapers, said in Zagreb that they
have begun to pay their debts to individual newspapers
from past sales. Editors of several independent
publications had charged that "Tisak" was deliberately
withholding payments to them in order to bankrupt the
independent periodicals. PM

HERZEGOVINIAN POLICE 'PUT ON PROBATION.' A spokeswoman
for the UN police force in Herzegovina said in Mostar on
28 January that UN has put the entire ethnic Croatian
police force of Stolac "on probation" for three months.
Members of the 50-strong force failed on numerous
occasions to come to the aid of returning Muslim
refugees when Croatian nationalists attacked the
Muslims. The police also failed to catch or punish the
attackers. Stolac was predominantly Muslim before the
Croatian-Muslim war of 1993-1994. PM

ALBANIAN PARLIAMENT CREATES OMBUDSMAN'S OFFICE.
Legislators voted on 28 January to set up an ombudsman's
office to investigate frequent complaints from the
public against the government and administration. The
ombudsman is also expected to help protect citizens'
rights. Elsewhere, Justice Minister Thimio Kondi signed
the European convention on corruption, ATSH reported. FS

TIRANA ISSUES ULTIMATUM TO REMOVE 'KIOSKS'. The
municipal authorities on 28 January ordered all owners
of numerous illegal buildings in Tirana's central Youth
Park to remove them within six month or face expulsion,
"Albanian Daily News" reported. The large park, which
since communism has become a symbol of Tirana's
uncontrolled urban development, is now filled with cafes
and restaurants. The ultimatum is part of a broader move
by the city to stop unlicensed construction activity.
Police began removing illegal buildings on central
Skanderbeg Square in early January. FS

ROMANIAN EXTREMIST PARTY EXPELS MINERS' LEADER. The
right-wing Greater Romania Party announced on 28 January
that it has expelled miners' leader Miron Cozma for
bringing the party "into disrepute," AFP reported. Cozma
had declared at the beginning of the strike that he
would temporarily withdraw from the party so that the
protest would not be seen as political. Cozma and the
miners received moral public support from Greater
Romania Party leader Corneliu Vadim Tudor, who was
suspended from the Senate (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 28
January 1999). Meanwhile, Nicolae Staiculescu, the state
secretary of the Industry Ministry, said the same day
that the miners will not receive a pay raise as part of
their settlement with the government. PB

ROMANIAN PRIME MINISTER IN BONN. Radu Vasile said on 28
January that he notices a new German attitude toward
Romania, Rompres reported. Vasile, speaking after a
meeting with German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, said
Germany, in its capacity as rotating chair of the EU,
could "greatly contribute to the EU's support of
Romania." He said Romania "counted on support" from Bonn
and added that democracy in Romania was "fragile." PB

BULGARIA PRAISED FOR UPGRADES AT NUKE PLANT. The
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said on 28
January that the controversial Kozloduy nuclear energy
plant has made "considerable progress in the areas of
safety," AP reported. IAEA deputy chief Zygmund
Domaratzki said the main challenge is to maintain that
level of safety. The Bulgarian government has refused
requests from the West to close any of the four older
reactors at the plant before their 30-year lifespans are
over. The plant is Soviet-designed but has been upgraded
by such Western companies as Siemens and Westinghouse.
PB

END NOTE

THE CORRUPTION INVESTIGATION INTO LAZARENKO

by Lily Hyde

	Despite an ongoing investigation into former
Ukrainian Prime Minister Pavlo Lazarenko, who is
suspected of corruption, the political party he created
has nominated him to run for president in the October
elections. Lazarenko was an ally of President Leonid
Kuchma until the latter fired him in July 1997. Since
then, he has grown increasingly critical of Kuchma, who
is expected to run for re-election in the fall.
	At last week's congress, Lazarenko won the backing
of his Hromoda party by a vote of 258 to one. The party
also gave Lazarenko permission to negotiate a coalition
deal with other opposition parties ahead of the
election.
	Meanwhile, the corruption case against Lazarenko
continues. It garnered international headlines early
last month when Lazarenko was detained by Swiss police
as he attempted to cross the border from France using a
Panama passport issued to a "Mr. Lopez."
	In early December, he was charged with laundering
$20 million but was released two weeks later when an
unknown benefactor put up $3 million in bail. If
convicted of money laundering under Swiss law, he faces
up to five years in prison.
	Swiss authorities confirmed earlier this month that
they would also continue helping Ukraine with its
inquiries about Lazarenko's Swiss bank accounts.
Lazarenko is accused by the Ukrainian authorities of
taking millions of dollars out of Ukraine and channeling
them to his private Swiss accounts via Russia's United
Energy Systems (EES). That company was granted exclusive
contracts to distribute natural gas to one-third of
Ukraine during Lazarenko's term in office, from June
1996 to July 1997. In 1996, EES made a profit totaling
$1 billion but paid less than $6,000 in taxes.
	Ukrainian Prosecutor-General Mykhailo Potebenko has
repeatedly said his office has enough evidence to charge
the former prime minister, but he has declined to
release details while Lazarenko is protected by
parliamentary immunity. The parliament is due to
consider lifting his immunity next month. That debate is
expected to be heated.
	Lazarenko has denied any wrongdoing and claims the
allegations against him--both in Switzerland and at
home--are part of a plot to discredit him and his party
ahead of the election. Meanwhile, the investigators
continue to spread their net still further. Police in
The Netherlands confirmed earlier this month that at
Ukraine's request, they have made inquiries into a Dutch
company involved in a cattle-for-metal deal. Under that
deal, put together by Lazarenko's close ally and fellow
Hromada party member Mykola Agofonov in 1995, large
amounts of money allegedly ended up in Lazarenko's
accounts.
	There is widespread speculation that some of
Lazarenko's political opponents continue to profit from
the very gas monopolies that Lazarenko allegedly
exploited. There has also been speculation that if
Lazarenko is formally indicted, he may seek to bring
down with him many of his former allies still in
government.
	Many political analysts consider the investigation
into Lazarenko not as a concerted effort to expose
corruption but rather as a power struggle within the so-
called Dnipropetrovsk "clan," which still dominates the
government. President Kuchma, former boss of the
Dnipropetrovsk rocket plant Yuzhmash, has surrounded
himself with colleagues from the eastern Ukrainian city.
	In 1996, Kuchma asked Lazarenko to leave his post
of governor of the Dnipropetrovsk region to become
deputy prime minister. Lazarenko remained in government
until Kuchma fired him. He then established his Hromada
party and built it up into a significant political force
with more than 40 seats in the parliament. Its political
platform barely differs from that of the People's
Democratic Party, the group most closely allied with
Kuchma.
	At his Kyiv press conference last month, Lazarenko
insisted that he has not broken any Swiss laws. But he
acknowledged he was a participant in a "dirty war" in
which each side had overstepped a predetermined line.
	According to Vyacheslav Pikhovshek, an analyst at
Kyiv's Independent Center for Political Research, "this
means that there was a deal" between Lazarenko and those
still in power. He says the parties to the deal "agreed
that they would not break specific rules--and these
rules have nothing in common with the law."
	So far, however, nothing has been proven in a court
of law. It is therefore difficult for an observer to
draw conclusions about the Lazarenko affair. But two
things are clear. The investigation is adding to the
perception abroad that corruption plays a large role in
business dealings in Ukraine, a perception widely seen
as a key factor in frightening off foreign investors.
Second, it is adding to the cynicism with which many
ordinary Ukrainians view their country's political
leaders.

The author is a Kyiv-based contributor to RFE/RL.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1999 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
listmanager@list.rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 23 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour
LIVE Broadcast Studio.
http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble
via email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Bruce Pannier, PannierB@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Pete Baumgartner, Jolyon Naegele, Fabian Schmidt,
Matyas Szabo, Anthony Wesolowsky

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


©1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole