Give Peace A Chance. - John Lennon and Paul McCartney
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 2, No. 211, Part I, 2 November 1998


________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 2, No. 211, Part I, 2 November 1998

A daily report of developments in Eastern and
Southeastern Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central
Asia prepared by the staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio
Liberty.

This is Part I, a compilation of news concerning Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia. Part II covers Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document.  Back issues of
RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at
RFE/RL's Web site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part I

* GOVERNMENT APPROVES ANTI-CRISIS PLAN

* REVENUES RISE, WAGES ARE PAID

* GEORGIAN, ABKHAZ PRESIDENTS TO MEET

End Note: WHEN MOSCOW LOOKS BEYOND THE CIS
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

RUSSIA

GOVERNMENT APPROVES ANTI-CRISIS PLAN... After much
delay, the government of Prime Minister Yevgenii
Primakov approved the broad outline of its "anti-crisis
program" on 31 October. Details of the plan, however,
will not be "finalized" until 5 November, Interfax
reported. Primakov said the plan is more "a system of
measures" that could be continually revised than a fixed
program. The program calls for regulation of prices on
essential foods and medicines and a gradual reduction of
the value-added and profit taxes. Exporters will
continue having to sell 75 percent of their hard
currency to the government, while the Central Bank will
implement its plan to restructure the commercial banking
system. JAC

...AS SOME CRITICS LABEL IT INFLATIONARY. The IMF
mission, according to Interfax, called the plan "a step
backward in the process of moving toward a market
economy." Chairman of the Duma Budget Committee
Aleksandr Zhukov of the Russian Regions faction told
Ekho Moskvy that the program does not contain "actual
figures" and "its effectiveness cannot be judged." He
added that the program outlines "many measures that
require additional expenses or lead to temporary cuts in
revenue." Federal Securities Commission Chairman Dmitrii
Vasiliev also criticized the plan, suggesting that its
inflation forecast of no more than 5 percent a month for
the rest of the year needs to be revised upward. Echoing
Zhukov's criticism, Vasiliev said that the plan would
require the government to undertake some significant
expenses, including wage and pension hikes. JAC

REVENUES RISE, WAGES ARE PAID. The government collected
13 billion rubles ($812 million) in tax revenues last
month, up 40 percent from the September level, the State
Tax Service reported on 30 October. Finance Minister
Mikhail Zadornov told Russian Television the next day
that the government has collected more than 17 billion
rubles "in real money" for the budget. Zadornov did not
explain what portion of the 17 billion rubles was
accounted for by tax collections. According to Interfax,
the IMF mission called on the government to return to
the practice of accepting tax payments only in cash.
Both Zadornov and Primakov declared that all wages to
government workers--both civilian and military--were
paid for October. JAC

YELTSIN'S FINGER STILL ON NUCLEAR BUTTON. Primakov told
reporters on 31 October that the transfer of
presidential powers to the prime minister during Boris
Yeltsin's leave is "strictly out of the question" (see
"RFE/RL Newsline 29 October 1998). He added that the
"nuclear briefcase" remains "reliably in the president's
hands." The next day, Oleg Sysuev, deputy head of
presidential administration, told NTV that the
"Financial Times" misquoted him as referring to a
possible limitation of the role of the president. He
added that the political role of the president would
gain strength only until 2000, although the president's
responsibilities vis-a-vis the economy might be reduced.
JAC

YABLOKO TO SEEK NO ALLIANCES... Yabloko members wrapped
up a plenary meeting of the movement's Central Council
on 1 November with public statements that the movement
will not create any blocs or coalitions for upcoming
State Duma and presidential elections. Yabloko leader
Grigorii Yavlinskii told council members that Duma
elections are more important than the presidential
ballot and that Yabloko will participate in those
elections entirely on its own. Vladimir Lukin, chairman
of the Duma's Foreign Affairs Committee, also said a
national coalition with the Communist Party is
impossible and that Yabloko will consider concluding
separate agreements with the Communists on a regional
level only under a worst-case scenario. JAC

...AS COMMUNISTS PROMISE THE SAME. At its plenum on 31
October-1 November, the Communist Party passed a motion
calling for the party to present its own party list in
Duma elections rather than form an election bloc.
Earlier, party leader Gennadii Zyuganov downplayed
recent talk of an alliance with Moscow Mayor Yurii
Luzhkov (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 1 October 1998). He told
reporters on 31 October that "we've already got an left-
center bloc--it's called the People's Patriotic Union."
The same day, Luzhkov told Russian Public Television
that he is not involved in negotiations for the creation
of a center-left coalition. JAC

RUSSIA TO SELL 5 PERCENT OF GAZPROM. Yeltsin has signed
a decree authorizing the sale of 5 percent of Gazprom,
the presidential press service reported on 2 November.
Earlier, Russian agencies reported that between 2.5 and
3 percent of the company would be up for sale (see
"RFE/RL Newsline, 26 October 1998). JAC

IMF, RUSSIA TO STAY IN TOUCH. The IMF mission to Moscow
wound up its most recent visit on 30 October saying that
while there is a "common view on the desirable
objectives for economic policy through the end of next
year, the necessary policy measures are still under
consideration in important areas." According to Russian
agency reports, the mission may return to Russia in mid-
November. Prime Minister Primakov told reporters that
the fund objected to measures calling for state
regulation of the economy but that such objections run
counter to the statements of IMF Managing Director
Michel Camdessus that macroeconomic policies alone are
insufficient to manage an economy. Primakov added that
although a portion of money provided by the IMF to
Russia has "gotten into the hands of dishonest people,
the majority of the money has been used properly." JAC

RUSSIA CAUTIONS BAGHDAD. In a statement issued on 1
November, the Russian Foreign Ministry expressed "deep
concern" at Iraq's decision the previous day to stop
limited cooperation with UN weapons inspectors, Russian
agencies reported. The statement called on Baghdad to
"weigh scrupulously" the possible consequences of that
decision and to renew its cooperation as the sole path
to resolving the Iraqi problem and creating a normal
life for the country's population. A Russian State Duma
delegation headed by deputy speaker Mikhail Gutseriev is
scheduled to meet with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein on
2 November. LF

POLL ON RUSSIAN-JAPANESE RELATIONS. A poll conducted by
ITAR-TASS and the Japanese newspaper "Asahi Shimbun"
shows most Japanese and many Russians do not think a
formal peace treaty will be signed between their two
countries by the year 2000. The poll was conducted in
September-October and involved 2,400 people on the
Russian mainland, 300 on Sakhalin Island, 300 on the
Kuril Islands, and 3,000 in Japan. Most respondents did
not think relations between Russia and Japan are
developing "successfully," and the majority felt issues
other than the territorial one should be a priority.
However, most Russians polled said the four disputed
Kuril Islands should not be given back to Japan under
any circumstances, while most Japanese favored gradual
transfer of those territories. If the islands were to be
handed over to Japan, 49 percent of the residents on the
islands said they would move to the Russian mainland. BP

YUGOSLAVIA 'OBSERVES' BELARUSIAN-RUSSIAN ASSEMBLY. The
parliamentary assembly of the Union of Russia and
Belarus holds its ninth session in Yaroslavl on 2
November. A delegation from the Yugoslav parliament led
by Vojislav Seselj, Serbian deputy prime minister and
leader of the Serbian Radical Party, is expected to
attend, ITAR-TASS reported. The assembly is expected to
grant the status of "permanent observer" to Yugoslavia.
Russian State Duma Deputy Speaker Sergei Baburin of the
People's Power faction suggested that Yugoslavia be
asked to join the Union of Belarus and Russia during a
recent visit by Russian Duma members to Belgrade. JAC

NIKITIN'S LAWYERS PRESS FOR ACQUITTAL. Despite a judge's
decision to return his case for further investigation by
the prosecution, Aleksandr Nikitin, who is charged with
espionage, and his lawyers plan to file a complaint with
Russia's Supreme Court and the International Court of
Human Rights in Strasbourg, according to a Bellona
Foundation press release (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 30
October 1998). Nikitin's lawyers contend that their
client should be formally acquitted since no crime can
be proven and that not to do so is a violation of their
client's human rights. Nikitin's lawyers also want the
Russian Supreme Court to lift travel restrictions
imposed on their client. JAC

VOTERS TURN OUT FOR CHUVASH ELECTIONS. All seats on the
State Council of Chuvashia may at last be filled
following by-elections in 23 districts where voter
turnout--25 percent--was sufficient to declare the
ballot valid, ITAR-TASS reported on 2 November. In July
elections, only 64 out of 87 vacancies in the council
were filled. JAC

GLENN'S COMEBACK TO TRIGGER SECOND SPACE RACE? Following
former U.S. Senator John Glenn's return to space, former
Russian Cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov, 64, told Interfax on 1
November that he is ready to make his own space flight.
He suggested that a two-week rather than six-month stay
on space station "Mir" would be appropriate. Meanwhile,
fellow space veteran German Titov, 63, told ITAR-TASS
that he would like to beat the 77-year-old Glenn's
record as the oldest man in space, pledging to maintain
his excellent physical condition over the next 15 years
and hurtle into space once again. JAC

CHECHEN PRESIDENT, RIVALS REACH AGREEMENT. Aslan
Maskhadov on 31 October met with a group of elders
representing the three field commanders who have been
demanding his impeachment and resignation, ITAR-TASS
reported. Presidential spokesman Mairbek Vachagaev said
that Shamil Basaev, Salman Raduev, and Khunkar-pasha
Israpilov agreed to withdraw those demands and meet for
talks with Maskhadov. Maskhadov then canceled a rally
planned for 1 November at which he had intended to
explain his domestic and foreign policies to the Chechen
people. Also on 31 October, Maskhadov named former
parliamentary speaker Akhyad Idigov as foreign minister.
Idigov accompanied him to Vladikavkaz last week to meet
with Russian Prime Minister Primakov. Idigov replaces
Movladi Udugov, who served as foreign minister since
February 1997. The government of acting Prime Minister
Shamil Basaev resigned in July. LF

TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

GEORGIAN, ABKHAZ PRESIDENTS TO MEET. Following talks in
Tbilisi on 29-30 October with Georgian President Eduard
Shevardnadze and Minister of State Vazha Lortkipanidze,
Abkhaz presidential envoy Anri Djergenia told
journalists that the long-anticipated meeting between
Shevardnadze and Abkhaz President Vladislav Ardzinba
will take place in the first half on November, probably
in Sukhumi, Russian and Georgian agencies reported.
Lortkipanidze said the two sides made significant
progress toward an agreement on the repatriation of
ethnic Georgians forced to flee their homes in Abkhazia
during the 1992-1993 war and the renewed hostilities in
May 1998. He added that at their upcoming meeting, the
two presidents will sign the repatriation agreement and
another abjuring the use of force, according to Reuters.
But they will not discuss the future political status of
Abkhazia. On 29 October, two bombs damaged the premises
of Abkhaz State Television in Sukhumi and a mobile
television transmitter, the Netherlands-based Abkhaz
Documentation Centre reported. LF

SHEVARDNADZE MEETS WITH DISPLACED PERSONS. Shevardnadze
on 31 October addressed a Tbilisi congress of some 1,000
delegates representing ethnic Georgian fugitives from
Abkhazia, Reuters and Caucasus Press reported.
Shevardnadze appealed to those fugitives to "be
patient," assuring them that within a few years, Georgia
will "restore its territorial integrity." Shevardnadze
said that if talks with Abkhazia on a peaceful solution
to the conflict become deadlocked, the UN will consider
a Bosnia-style peace enforcement operation. But two days
later, in his weekly radio address, Shevardnadze ruled
out that option. Abkhaz parliament in exile chairman
Tamaz Nadareishvili told the fugitives' congress that
the only way Georgia can restore its jurisdiction over
Abkhazia is by force. On 1 November, a group of 250
homeless fugitives failed in their attempt to occupy a
Tbilisi hospital, Interfax reported. The leader of those
fugitives, Boris Kakubava, denounced the 31 October
congress for failing to defend the fugitives' interests.
LF

GEORGIAN PRESIDENT UPBEAT OVER OIL TRANSIT
DECLARATION... Both on 30 October and in his 2 November
radio address, Shevardnadze expressed confidence that
the planned Baku-Ceyhan export pipeline for Caspian oil
will be built. Shevardnadze and the presidents of
Turkey, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan signed the
so-called "Ankara declaration" on 29 October pledging
their support for construction of that pipeline.
Shevardnadze estimated that construction will take four
or five years and that Georgia will receive $10 per
metric ton in transit fees for Kazakh oil exported via
the Baku-Supsa pipeline. But Kazakh presidential
spokesman Asylbek Bisenbayev told journalists on 30
October that the Baku-Ceyhan pipeline will be
economically viable only if both Kazakh and Azerbaijani
crude is exported via that route, according to Interfax.
LF

...WHILE IRAN, CHECHNYA REMAIN SKEPTICAL. Iranian
Foreign Ministry press secretary Makhmud Mohammedi on 30
October deplored what he termed the "politicization" of
the choice of the Caspian export pipeline, Turan
reported. Mohammedi said that the pressure currently
being exerted on the countries of the Caucasus and
Central Asia over the optimum pipeline route is
counterproductive, adding that raising the funds to
finance the Baku-Ceyhan pipeline will hinder those
countries' economic development in other spheres.
Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov stressed that he
agrees with the Russian argument that the Baku-
Novorossiisk pipeline, which transits Chechnya, is the
most economical route, according to Interfax. Meanwhile
in Kyiv, Stephen Sestanovich, special aide to the U.S.
secretary of state on the Newly Independent States ,
said that U.S. support for Baku-Ceyhan does not preclude
the export of some Caspian oil via Ukrainian territory.
That oil would be shipped by tanker from Supsa to
Odessa. But Sestanovich added that Kyiv must convince
potential investors of its attractiveness as an
alternative export route. LF

DASHNAKS DEMAND CORRUPTION CRACKDOWN. More than 10,000
people attended a rally in Yerevan on 30 October
convened by the Armenian Revolutionary Federation (HHD),
RFE/RL's Yerevan bureau reported. Speakers called on the
Armenian leadership to officially condemn corruption and
mismanagement by the previous administration, which they
claimed are the cause of persisting economic hardship.
Specifically, they accused a number of former leading
officials of taking advantage of the privatization
process to embezzle public funds. Although the HHD
supports President Robert Kocharian, speakers at the
rally stressed that it is not a "ruling party" in an
apparent bid to distance the HHD from unpopular
officials in central and local government. LF

TWO PARTIES QUIT ARMENIAN PRESIDENTIAL COUNCIL. Ruben
Vartanian of the center-right Self-Determination Union
told RFE/RL's Yerevan bureau on 31 October that his
party will quit the presidential council created earlier
this year by Kocharian. Arguing that the council has not
met expectations, Vartanian deplored the fact that other
parties represented on the council have retreated from
an earlier agreement that the council's chairmanship
should rotate every three months. On 29 October, the
former ruling Armenian Pan-National Movement (HHSh)
announced its withdrawal from the council, which it
claimed failed to discuss a single major problem facing
the country, according to "Hayk." HHSh chairman Vano
Siradeghian told "Aravot" that there is no point in his
party remaining a member of the council as no "serious
forces" are represented on it. Nine parties are still
members of the council. Those parties do not include the
Communists or Vazgen Manukian's National Democratic
Union. LF

KAZAKH OPPOSITION LEADER ARRESTED. Azamat co-chairman
Petr Svoik was arrested by Interior Ministry troops on
30 October, Interfax reported. One of the leaders of the
Kazakh Workers Movement, Semen Grobovskii, said Svoik
was charged with slander, inciting "national conflict,"
and insulting an official. In other news, Interfax
reported the same day that another candidate for the
January presidential elections, vice president of the
Munai research and production center Zhaksybai
Bazilbayev, has passed the necessary Kazakh language
examination. He joins President Nursultan Nazarbayev,
former Prime Minister Akezhan Kazhegeldin, Communist
Party candidate Serikbolsyn Abdildin and independent
candidate Engels Gabbasov in clearing that hurdle. BP

IMF TO EXTEND LOAN TO KAZAKHSTAN. The IMF is prepared to
loan Kazakhstan between $400 million and $440 million as
part of an Extended Fund Facility "to support National
Bank reserves," Interfax reported on 30 October. IMF
official Willy Kiekens said at a news conference on 30
October that IMF figures show Kazakhstan's trade with
Russia, its leading trading partner, fell by 50 percent
during the last few months. Planned budget revenues from
the sale of metals to southeastern Asia will fall far
short owing to the financial crisis in that region.
Kiekens praised Kazakhstan's "strict budget and fiscal
policy" as well as its tax and pension reform for
keeping the country afloat without an IMF Extended Fund
Facility loan. At the same time, he noted that IMF
forecasts show Kazakhstan will fail to achieve the
planned 3 percent GDP growth this year and that there
will be "no growth" in 1999. BP

KAZAKH PRESIDENT IN UZBEKISTAN. Nursultan Nazarbayev
wrapped up his first official visit to neighboring
Uzbekistan by signing an "eternal friendship" treaty
with his Uzbek counterpart, Islam Karimov, ITAR-TASS and
Interfax reported on 31 October. The two leaders also
signed an agreement on economic cooperation for the
years 1998-2005. Karimov later said that the current
level of bilateral cooperation is insufficient, adding
that it is necessary to work with Kyrgyzstan and
Tajikistan, which are partners in the Central Asian
Economic Union. The two sides also signed accords on
cooperation in customs, education, culture, and health
care as well as on combating crime. BP

UZBEK PRESIDENT URGES CIS REFORM. At a press conference
with Nazarbayev after the signing of agreements, Karimov
said "the structure of the Commonwealth should be
seriously reformed," ITAR-TASS reported. Karimov said
the CIS's main objective should be "widening the
economic interaction" of member states to include the
creation of free trade zones. Karimov also commented on
Kazakh-Uzbek relations, saying it is incorrect to
described them as "cold and strained," Reuters reported.
Karimov said he thinks relations are such "when Moscow
wants it." However, Nazarbayev noted "this is not the
policy of Russia" and that both presidents are
"strategic partners" of Russian President Yeltsin. BP

U.S. SUSPENDS EMBASSY WORK IN TAJIKISTAN. The deputy
U.S. ambassador to Tajikistan, Francis Culpepper,
announced on 30 October that all embassy activities in
Tajikistan have been suspended, ITAR-TASS reported.
Culpepper said the move is in response to terrorist
attacks on U.S. embassies in Africa and concerns over
security at the embassy in Dushanbe. The embassy will
resume work as soon as a new, more secure building is
found. The embassy has been working with a skeleton crew
since late September. BP

END NOTE

WHEN MOSCOW LOOKS BEYOND THE CIS

by Paul Goble

	Moscow's use of military power in the countries of
the Commonwealth of Independent States may have less to
do with the situation within the individual member
states than with Russian policies toward countries and
alliances further afield.
	That possibility, seldom considered in the West,
was raised last month by Azerbaijani President Heidar
Aliev during his meeting with visiting representatives
of the North Atlantic Parliamentary Assembly's Committee
on NATO Expansion and Assistance to the Newly
Independent States. Speaking to that group on 24
October, Aliev said that various Russians had told him
Moscow is providing large-scale military assistance to
Armenia both to help Yerevan in its conflict with Baku
over Nagorno-Karabakh and to put pressure on Turkey and
NATO's southern flank.
	On the one hand, Aliev's remarks were most
immediately intended to try to involve more West
European countries in finding a resolution of the
Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. By suggesting that Russia's
de facto military alliance with Armenia meant that
Moscow could no longer be a neutral arbiter as co-
chairman of the OSCE Minsk Group charged with resolving
the Karabakh dispute, Aliev clearly hoped to convince
the West Europeans to play a new and larger role in
securing peace in the region.
	Aliev also repeated that his government is prepared
to "grant a high degree of self-rule to Nagorno-Karabakh
within Azerbaijan" but suggested that "we can give
nothing more than that." He appealed to the West
Europeans to "indicate strongly to Armenia that its
additional demands are unfounded and will never be
accepted." And the Azerbaijani leader responded to
European concerns about human rights by noting that some
international organizations focusing on the violation of
human rights in Baku have done little or nothing about
what he called the "mass violation" of the rights of
more than 1 million Azerbaijanis forced to leave their
homes because of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. The
UNHCR estimates the number of displaced persons at
860,000.
	But on the other hand, Aliev's comments call
attention to a broader issue that so far has received
relatively little attention either in the countries of
the region or in the West: the possibility that Russian
actions in what many in Moscow still call the "near
abroad" are in fact directed at countries in the "far
abroad."
	With the exception of discussions of so-called
flank modifications in the Conventional Forces in Europe
Treaty, most analysts in Russia's neighbors and the West
have considered Russia's military involvement in former
Soviet republics almost exclusively in terms of Moscow's
interest in maintaining its influence there. Thus,
Russia's military assistance to Armenia and its
establishment of bases there have generally been
considered only in terms of Moscow's desire to play a
major role in the Caucasus. And Russian involvement in
the Transdniester region of Moldova or in Tajikistan has
been discussed only in terms of Russian interests in
those countries or in their respective regions.
	While such attention to Russian actions is entirely
understandable both in these countries and in the West,
it has three consequences that may prove more
significant for international security.
	First, focusing attention on the influence of
Russian actions in the CIS states often distracts
analysts from considering the ways in which these
actions may have a broader impact. Sometimes they will,
sometimes they will not. But Aliev's observation may
help to sensitize people to this possibility.
	Second, such attention inevitably increases the
concerns many non-Russians feel about Moscow's
intentions. To the extent they see themselves as the
target, they may draw one set of conclusions. To the
extent they see Moscow's aims as broader, they may draw
very different conclusions, possibly leading them to
seek different solutions than would otherwise have been
the case.
	And third, such attention inevitably deflects
Western attention away from Russian moves throughout the
region as a whole. To the extent that what Moscow does
is seen only through the prism of the CIS or the concept
of "newly independent states," many Western governments
may be inclined to play down the implications of what
Russia intends.
	Moreover, if they view Moscow's goals more broadly,
as Aliev suggests they should do, Western governments
may conclude that they should pay closer attention to
Russia's involvement in the former Soviet republics than
they previously thought.
	Clearly, Aliev hopes that Western countries will
reach that conclusion about Russian involvement in
Armenia and the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict. But his
analytic point clearly applies across the board
throughout this all too unstable region.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1998 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with
the word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
listmanager@list.rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 23 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour
LIVE Broadcast Studio.
http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact Paul Goble
via
email at GobleP@rferl.org or fax at 1-202-457-6992
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org
* Julie A. Corwin, CorwinJ@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Bruce Pannier, PannierB@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org

FREE-LANCE AND OCCASIONAL CONTRIBUTORS
* Pete Baumgartner, Jolyon Naegele, Fabian Schmidt,
Matyas Szabo, Anthony Wesolowsky

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole