He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom. - J.R. Tolkien
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 2, No. 142 Part I, 27 July 1998


___________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 2, No. 142 Part I, 27 July 1998

A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern
Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by
the staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part I, a compilation of news concerning Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia. Part II covers Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document. Back issues of RFE/RL
Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at RFE/RL's
Web site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part I

* PRIMAKOV ATTENDS ASEAN REGIONAL FORUM

* SUSPECTS ARRESTED IN CHECHEN ASSASSINATION BID

* GEORGIAN STATE MINISTER RESIGNS

End Note: NEW RULING PARTY IN ARMENIA?
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

RUSSIA

PRIMAKOV ATTENDS ASEAN REGIONAL FORUM... Following the fifth
regional forum of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations
on 27 July in Manila, Russian Foreign Minister Yevgenii
Primakov noted at a press conference that there have been
two major "negative changes" since last year's forum: the
Asian financial crisis and the nuclear tests conducted by
India and Pakistan, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. With
regard to the former, Primakov said it has "considerably
affected Russia." As regards the latter, he commented that
the emergence of a "chain" of nuclear powers will
destabilize the world situation especially if some "are
involved in regional conflicts." Primakov encouraged "every
country" to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. But
he repeated his country's position that no sanctions should
be imposed against either India or Pakistan as "sanctions
mainly hit the population instead of those making this or
that political decision." BP

...HOLDS KEY PRIVATE MEETINGS. After arriving in Manila on
26 July to attend the ASEAN forum, Primakov met with
Japanese Foreign Minister Keidzo Obuchi, ITAR-TASS reported.
Primakov said his country "warmly greeted" Obuchi's election
as head of the Liberal-Democratic Party, which guarantees
his becoming prime minister on 30 July. Obuchi made it clear
Japan will continue the process of improving relations with
Russia, which began under out-going Prime Minister Ryutaro
Hashimoto. Primakov also met with his South Korean
counterpart, Park Chung-soo. Primakov failed to persuade
Park to retract a decision expelling Russian diplomat Oleg
Abramkin from South Korea. That move followed Russia's
expulsion in early July of a South Korean diplomat who was
allegedly a spy. BP

GORE LAUDS KIRIENKO, RUSSIAN REFORMS. U.S. Vice President
Albert Gore told a 24 July press conference that Prime
Minister Sergei Kirienko has a "full command of the facts"
and that their talks on 23-24 July were "very concentrated
and fruitful." Gore said in an interview with Reuters that
he is "optimistic, especially after the agreement with the
IMF, that [Russia is] going to turn the corner and start
experiencing some real economic growth," Kirienko said that
the State Duma's opposition to the government's
stabilization program is "a normal part of politics." Gore
also expressed support for Russia's accession to the World
Trade Organization. On 24 July, Gore spoke with vacationing
President Boris Yeltsin by telephone about U.S. President
Bill Clinton's trip to Moscow in September 1998. He also met
with ex-Prime Minister Chernomyrdin, with whom the U.S. vice
president had regular meetings for five years. BT

GORE SAYS RUSSIA TO CRACK DOWN ON TECHNOLOGICAL EXPORTS TO
IRAN. "Russia has now really agreed to crack down on actions
that result in the unauthorized transfer of technology to
places like Iran," Gore told Reuters after his 24 July
meeting with Kirienko. Gore confirmed that he and Kirienko
"made some headway" on the issue of Russian technological
exports to Iran and that a recent U.S.-Russian agreement
will "see measures taken against some nine firms that have
violated or are alleged to have violated Russian export
policies." Meanwhile, at a 24 July Moscow press conference,
Gore expressed concern about Iran's recent test of a mid-
range North-Korean missile, detected by U.S. spy satellites
on 22 July. Moscow has denied that it rendered any official
assistance to Iran's missile program. Gore also urged
Kirienko to support the Duma's ratification of the START-2
weapons reduction treaty, ITAR-TASS reported. BT

GORE, KIRIENKO SIGN NUCLEAR CONVERSION AGREEMENTS. Also on
24 July, Gore and Kirienko signed a preliminary agreement,
entitled "nuclear cities initiative," to convert the
economies of Russia's closed nuclear cities to civilian
production as well as an accord on converting U.S. and
Russian plutonium into fuel for Russia's nuclear power
plants. Under the first agreement, the U.S. pledged an
initial $3.1 million to support nine civilian high-
technology projects, primarily for nuclear scientists in
Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod, Reuters reported on 24 July. Funds
will reportedly not be used to pay wage arrears, which
amount to $16 million in Sarov alone. The second agreement
plans for $1 billion funding annually over five years to
convert 50 tons of nuclear weapons plutonium into an oxide
usable for fuel in nuclear power plants. Gore said the U.S.
expects France, Germany, and Russia to help finance the
building of the first plants. BT

SUSPECTS ARRESTED IN CHECHEN ASSASSINATION BID. Six persons
were arrested on 24 July in connection with the attempt the
previous day to kill Chechen President Aslan Maskhadov,
Russian media reported. Among those arrested was the owner
of the apartment where the attack was planned. The names of
the six detainees have not been made public. Chechen State
Security Minister Aslanbek Arsaev told Chechen Television on
26 July that the crime is 90 percent solved. Responding to
an official request by Maskhadov, former acting Chechen
President Zelimkhan Yandarbiev went to the Shariah criminal
court in Grozny on 24 July but was not required to swear on
the Koran that he played no part in the assassination bid.
Speaking on Chechen Television several days earlier,
Yandarbiev had criticized Maskhadov's policies. LF

MASKHADOV, KIRIENKO TO MEET. Maskhadov is ready to meet at
any time with Russian Prime Minister [Sergei] Kirienko,
Chechen presidential spokesman Mairbek Vachagaev told ITAR-
TASS on 26 July. Reuters quoted Maskhadov as saying that he
still believes dialogue can facilitate "understanding"
between Moscow and Chechnya. Kirienko conducted successful
negotiations with Chechen leaders last year on the transit
of Caspian oil through the Baku-Grozny-Tikhoretsk-
Novorossiisk pipeline. During talks with Kirienko the
previous day, President Yeltsin had advocated that the
premier meet with Maskhadov. No date has been set for that
meeting, which could take place either in Moscow or in the
Ingush capital, Nazran, according to RFE/RL's Grozny
correspondent. Yeltsin also affirmed his support for the
Chechen president and government. LF

HUNGARIAN HOSTAGES RELEASED IN CHECHNYA. Foreign Ministry
spokesman Gabor Horvath said on 25 July that two Hungarian
nationals kidnapped in October 1997 by gunmen in Grozny have
been released without the payment of a ransom by the
Hungarian government. He said paying a ransom would have
encouraged the kidnapping of other Hungarian nationals.
Horvath declined to provide further details on the release,
saying only that Budapest had "used the experience of other
countries" in handling similar cases in Chechnya. MS

YELTSIN REPLACES FSB CHIEF. Yeltsin signed a decree on 25
July removing Nikolai Kovalev as director of the Federal
Security Service (FSB), the main successor to the Soviet-era
KGB. Kovalev had held that post since June 1996. The Kremlin
gave no reason for his dismissal, which came after Yeltsin
discussed various policy matters with Prime Minister
Kirienko in Karelia. Before Kovalev's dismissal was
announced, Yeltsin told reporters that "you [journalists]
sometimes fail to understand sackings," ITAR-TASS and
Reuters reported. The president said he has "significantly
more information" about the daily work of his appointees
than do journalists, who "do not know so many details" and
consequently consider some dismissals "illogical." Ekho
Moskvy speculated on 25 July that Yeltsin will soon sack
Deputy Prime Ministers Oleg Sysuev and Viktor Khristenko.
However, Kirienko told journalists two days later that he
and Yeltsin discussed "no personnel questions" other than
Kovalev's dismissal. LB

WHO IS VLADIMIR PUTIN? Vladimir Putin, whom Yeltsin
appointed as new director of the FSB, worked in the KGB's
foreign intelligence department during the 1970s, ITAR-TASS
reported. Putin returned to his native city of Leningrad in
the 1980s and held several high-ranking posts in St.
Petersburg when Anatolii Sobchak was mayor in the early and
mid-1990s. He resigned from the city government after
Sobchak lost a June 1996 election. Putin joined the
presidential administration later the same year, when
Anatolii Chubais (whose political career also began in
Leningrad) was Yeltsin's chief of staff. From March 1997 to
May 1998, he headed the Kremlin's Main Controlling
Department. Since May he has been first deputy head of the
presidential administration in charge of relations with the
regions (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 26 May 1998). LB

REORGANIZATION OF FSB UNDER WAY. Although Kovalev denied
rumors of his impending dismissal, several Russian
newspapers speculated in recent weeks that Yeltsin would put
Putin in charge of the FSB. The service is being reorganized
in line with a presidential decree issued on 6 July. That
decree ordered the creation of two new FSB departments to
deal with economic security and constitutional security. It
is unclear how the new FSB departments will cooperate with
the Interior and Justice Ministries, "Russkii telegraf"
noted on 7 July. The FSB's new economic security department
will include a section focused on "computer security," which
is expected to cooperate with the Federal Agency for
Government Communications and Information. Yeltsin's decree
of 6 July also limits the number of FSB employees to 4,000,
which means the service will have to cut its staff by 15-20
percent by January 1999, "Vremya-MN" noted on 10 July. LB

LEBED OFFERS KIRIENKO NUCLEAR HEADACHE. Krasnoyarsk Krai
Governor Aleksandr Lebed has issued an open letter to Prime
Minister Kirienko proposing--apparently in jest--that a
nuclear missile unit in the city Uzhur-4 be transferred to
the jurisdiction of the krai's administration. Drawing
attention to the chronic funding shortfalls for the
military, Lebed warned Kirienko that the officers in the
unit have not been paid for five months, Interfax reported
on 24 July. He said "hungry" officers are "very angry"
officers, adding that "we, the people of Krasnoyarsk, are
not yet a rich people. But in exchange for the status of a
nuclear territory, we will, if you like, feed the unit,
becoming, with India and Pakistan, a headache for the world
community." The governor also warned Kirienko that "my
thoughts are as pure as a baby's tears" compared with the
thoughts of unpaid officers at the missile unit. LB

YELTSIN ORDERS SALE OF 5 PERCENT OF GAZPROM... Yeltsin
signed a decree on 25 July ordering the government to draft
plans for selling a 5 percent state-owned stake in Gazprom,
Russian news agencies reported. The decree sets no timetable
for selling the shares. The state currently owns a 40
percent stake in the gas monopoly but directly manages only
a 5 percent stake. Gazprom head Rem Vyakhirev manages the
rest of the state-owned shares under a trust agreement with
the government. In recent weeks, as officials have increased
the pressure on the gas monopoly to pay its tax bills, many
Russian media have speculated that either the government or
Vyakhirev will break the trust agreement. Yeltsin's decree
requires the state to maintain a 35 percent stake in
Gazprom, ensuring that it will remain the largest
shareholder in the company. LB

...REDUCED ENERGY RATES FOR SOME CUSTOMERS. A separate
presidential decree signed on 25 July calls for a 50 percent
reduction in electricity and gas charges for enterprises
that pay at least half of their electricity and gas bills in
cash, ITAR-TASS reported. Gazprom and the electricity giant
Unified Energy System (EES) currently collect cash payment
for far less than half of the energy they sell to customers.
The decree is designed to break the chain of non-payments in
the Russian economy and in turn help the government collect
full tax payments from Gazprom and EES, which account for a
large portion of federal tax revenues. LB

TWO MORE SUSPECTS CHARGED WITH KILLING KHOLODOV. The
Prosecutor-General's Office has charged another two men with
premeditated murder in the October 1994 killing of
investigative journalist Dmitrii Kholodov, Russian news
agencies reported on 24 July. The two men most recently
arrested and charged (there are now five in all) have been
identified as Aleksandr Soroka, an officer in the Moscow
branch of the Airborne Troops, and Aleksandr Kapuntsov,
deputy director-general of a private security firm called
Ross. According to "Kommersant-Daily" on 25 July,
investigators are turning their attention to Yevgenii
Podkolzin, a former commander of the Airborne Troops, and
Pavel Grachev, who was defense minister when Kholodov was
killed and is now an adviser to the arms exporter
Rosvooruzhenie. LB

SUPREME COURT PUTS BASHKORTOSTAN ELECTION IN DOUBT. The
Supreme Court on 24 July ruled that the electoral commission
of the Republic of Bashkortostan illegally struck two would-
be candidates off the ballot for a June presidential
election. Shortly before the election, the Supreme Court
ruled that Duma deputy Aleksandr Arinin and Marat
Mirgazyamov were entitled to run for the republican
presidency. The Bashkir electoral commission registered them
as candidates but almost immediately revoked their
registration for alleged campaign violations, "Nezavisimaya
gazeta" reported on 25 July. As a result, President Murtaza
Rakhimov faced only one opponent, and that candidate did not
criticize the incumbent during the campaign (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 15 and 23 June 1998). Arinin now plans to ask the
Bashkir Supreme Court to declare the election invalid. He
will again appeal to the federal Supreme Court if, as
expected, judges in Bashkortostan reject his case, RFE/RL's
Moscow bureau reported. LB

KALININGRAD LAUNCHES NEEDLE EXCHANGE PROGRAM. The first
needle exchange center in Russia has opened in the city of
Kaliningrad, "Segodnya" reported on 27 July. Kaliningrad
Oblast, which has some 926,000 residents, has more
registered AIDS cases than any other region of the Russian
Federation. As of March 1998, some 1,700 people in
Kaliningrad were known to carry HIV. The oblast center for
psychotherapy and a local foundation working against AIDS
and drug addition are sponsoring the program, which will
allow drug users to exchange used needles for new ones free
of charge. Free AIDS tests and other medical services will
also be available at the exchange center. Organizers plan to
open a mobile needle exchange center in Kaliningrad soon. LB

TRANSCAUCASUS AND CENTRAL ASIA

GEORGIAN STATE MINISTER RESIGNS. Niko Lekishvili tendered
his resignation to Georgian President Eduard Shevardnadze on
26 July, one day after calling on the entire cabinet to
resign. Lekishvili, who had coordinated the activities of
the government, argued that the ministers' voluntary
resignation would enable the president to undertake urgently
needed personnel changes. In his traditional weekly radio
address the following day, Shevardnadze admitted that some
cabinet members will lose their jobs but said this is a
"normal" occurrence that proves Georgia is becoming a
democratic country, according to Caucasus Press.
Shevardnadze said Lekishvili's resignation does not mean his
departure from national politics, but he declined to comment
on Lekishvili's chances--or those of Foreign Minister Irakli
Menagharishvili and Ambassador to Russia Vazha
Lortkipanidze--of heading the new government. Shevardnadze
said he is skeptical about the 300-day program drafted by
parliamentary speaker Zurab Zhvania for overcoming the
country's problems. He said that program reminds him of
"perestroika." LF

NO PROGRESS AT GEORGIAN-ABKHAZ TALKS. Meeting in Geneva
under UN auspices on 23-25 July, Georgian and Abkhaz
representatives failed to reach agreement on a draft
document detailing measures to resolve the Abkhaz conflict,
ITAR-TASS reported. Those measures entailed strengthening
the existing cease-fire in order to preclude further
terrorist activity, expediting the repatriation to Abkhazia
of ethnic Georgian displaced persons, and social and
economic reconstruction. Reuters quoted unspecified
diplomats as saying that the talks were "stormy" and that
the Abkhaz and Georgians exchanged accusations over the
current situation in Abkhazia's Gali Raion. A final
communique issued by the UN registered concern that the two
sides remain "far from agreement on the key aspects of a
settlement" and that the situation continues to deteriorate,
dpa reported. LF

CHAIRMAN OF FORMER ARMENIAN RULING PARTY INTERROGATED. Vano
Siradeghian, formerly interior minister and currently
chairman of the board of the Armenian Pan-National Movement
(HHSh), was summoned to the Prosecutor-General's Office on
22 July and interrogated by police two days later, RFE/RL's
Yerevan bureau reported on 24 July. Siradeghian was
questioned in connection with testimony given by former
Interior Ministry troops commander Vahan Harutiunian, who
was arrested in June on charges of corruption and suspected
murder. Speaking at a press conference, Interior and
National Security Minister Serzh Sarkisian declined to
confirm a direct connection between the investigation into
Harutiunian's case and the arrest in February of a gang led
by former police officer and Siradeghian associate Armen
Ter-Sahakian. Sahakian's gang has been charged with the
murder of several prominent political figures. On 25 July,
former President Levon Ter-Petrossian met with Siradeghian
at the HHSh's headquarters in Yerevan. LF

FORMER KARABAKH PREMIER GIVEN NEW JOB. Leonard Petrossian,
who stepped down last month as prime minister of the
unrecognized Nagorno-Karabakh Republic, has been appointed
as adviser to Armenian Prime Minister Armen Darpinian,
RFE/RL's Yerevan bureau reported on 24 July. Petrosian's
economic policies had been criticized by Karabakh Defense
Minister Samvel Babayan. LF

TAJIK PRESIDENT TAKES MEASURES TO ENSURE ORDER. Tajik
President Imomali Rakhmonov signed a decree on 24 July
designed to improve discipline within the armed forces,
ITAR-TASS and Reuters reported. The decree broadens the
powers of a special military inspection unit and calls for
an evaluation of all units and their needs. It also
prohibits members of the armed forces from wearing beards, a
move that is unlikely to be popular among fighters from the
United Tajik Opposition (UTO), who are currently being
absorbed into the regular Tajik army. The next day Rakhmonov
ordered the Defense, Interior, and Security Ministries to
review and improve discipline at roadside checkpoints
throughout the country. BP

LOYALTY OATH IN TAJIKISTAN MEETS WITH MIXED SUCCESS. While
48 fighters of the UTO based near the city of Nurek have
taken the oath of allegiance to the government, more than
600 in the Karategin region, east of Dushanbe, refused to do
so, Interfax reported on 24 July. The oath, which is
provided for by the 1997 Tajik peace accord, is a
requirement for UTO members who wish to continue military
service a soldier in the regular Tajik army. Those who did
not take the oath cited the government's failure to honor
all its commitments to the accord, including allotting 30
percent of the cabinet posts to UTO representatives. They
also said they are "offended" by thinly veiled statements
from the government that they were involved in the 20 July
murder of four UN employees working in Tajikistan. BP

UZBEK GDP GROWS IN FIRST HALF OF 1998. Uzbek President Islam
Karimov told a 23 July session of the cabinet that GDP rose
by 4 percent in the first six months of 1998, compared with
the same period last year, Interfax reported. According to
Karimov, industrial output was up 5.5 percent, agricultural
production 7.4 percent, production of consumer goods 6.5
percent, and construction 3.5 percent. He said monthly
inflation has shrunk to 1.5 percent, adding that this helped
ensure that "salaries, pensions, benefits, and grants were
paid on time." Karimov also noted that investments in the
economy have grown by 12 percent and now account for one-
third of GDP. And he noted that the country's trade balance
is "positive," exceeding $200 million. BP

END NOTE

NEW RULING PARTY IN ARMENIA?

by Emil Danielyan

	On 20 July, the most influential political group in
Armenia announced its transformation into a political party.
The Yerkrapah Union of Karabakh Veterans' merger with, or
more accurately takeover of, the nationalist Republican
Party of Armenia (HHK) signals a significant change in the
country's political landscape.
	That union is intended to reinforce and give a clear
organizational form to Yerkrapah, which is represented in
the cabinet by two ministers and controls most local
authorities. The takeover will be completed next fall, when
the new party convenes for its first congress.
	Numerous members of Armenia's "power class" are likely
to join the new party. Most representatives of that class
have nothing to do with the 1991-1994 war with Azerbaijan.
Having no specific ideology of their own, they tend to lend
support to leaders who wield the real levers of power and
can protect their interests. Yerkrapah's parliamentary
group, for example, is mostly composed of defectors from the
former majority Hanrapetutiun faction, which supported
former President Levon Ter-Petrossian. The HHK's ideological
core will now be the Yerkrapah elite, which has a growing
number of representatives in the government. As in the past,
the majority of rank-and-file war veterans are unlikely to
gain any government posts and therefore will barely benefit
from their organization's growing strength.
	Nationalism is the only certain element to be included
in the republicans' ideological platform. More precisely,
that means a hard line on the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict.
Yerkrapah leaders' declared support for democracy, the rule
of law, and economic reform sheds little light on the HHK's
position on other issues. Populist slogans will probably
feature large in its political program.
	But defending an ideology does not figure high among
the priorities of the man who initiated Yerkrapah's
transformation. The increasingly ambitious defense minister,
Vazgen Sarkisian, seems to be consolidating his control over
the executive branch. Given the way elections were handled
in Armenia in recent years, this control may be decisive.
Local bosses will now receive a clear message about whom to
"work for" in the parliamentary elections scheduled for
summer 1999. A similar tactic by President Ter-Petrossian in
1995 earned his supporters more than 80 percent of
parliamentary seats.
	But election fraud next year would pit Yerkrapah
against other parties, especially the Dashnak party (HHD),
which like Yerkrapah supports President Robert Kocharian.
Tensions may grow as soon as this fall, since Yerkrapah is
keen to push through its own draft election law, which
provides for most seats in the new parliament to be
allocated in single-member constituencies. Other parties
fear that this system would be encourage procedural
violations, including intimidation of voters. They advocate
allocating the majority of seats under a majority system.
	Such a disagreement could prove a major source of
trouble for Kocharian. Confrontation between the Dashnaks
and Yerkrapah would mean the collapse of the Justice and
Unity coalition, which was created last March to support his
presidential bid and which forms his power base. On the
other hand, election cooperation between the two groups is
unlikely as the Dashnaks believe they will beat Yerkrapah
(and most other parties) in a free-and-fair ballot. It is
very difficult to imagine the HHD staying in government if
there is election fraud next year. On the other hand,
democratic elections may mean defeat for Yerkrapah, leaving
Sarkisian vulnerable in the face of a hostile majority in
the parliament.
	One option for the Armenian president is to rely
solely on Sarkisian's loyal supporters. Unlike his
predecessor, Kocharian has no party of his own. The new
political group will unite mostly influential individuals
who do not demand sweeping political reforms. The question
is whether the growing influence of the defense minister
will ultimately make Kocharian dependent on him. The
president is already being criticized by the opposition and
his supporters for not cracking down on local mafia groups
associated with Yerkrapah. If Kocharian, who came to power
vowing to promote national accord, alienates the public he
will find himself alone with the new power class. Ter-
Petrossian's excessive reliance on the latter eventually
cost him the presidency.
	To avoid that fate, Kocharian will have to press ahead
with democratization, which, above all, requires free
elections. Such a vote, however, would endanger the
privileged status of the new power class., and there are few
indications that the new Yerkrapah party has been set up to
ensure fair political competition. If Kocharian seeks to
contain the influence of the party, a clash with Sarkisian
will be inevitable. If he chooses it as his main support
base, he risks being held hostage to the defense minister's
demands. So far, the Armenian president has been able to
avoid choosing between those two options. But recent
developments suggest it will become more and more difficult
for him to continue to do so.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1998 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with the
word subscribe as the subject of the message.

HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE
Send an email to newsline-request@list.rferl.org with the
word unsubscribe as the subject of the message.

For subscription problems or inquiries, please email
listmanager@list.rferl.org
________________________________________________
CURRENT AND BACK ISSUES ON THE WEB
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest are
online at: http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/
_________________________________________________
LISTEN TO NEWS FOR 18 COUNTRIES
RFE/RL programs for countries in Eastern Europe, the
Caucasus, Central Asia, Russia and the South Slavic region
are online daily at RFE/RL's 24-Hour LIVE Broadcast Studio.
http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html
_________________________________________________
REPRINT POLICY
To receive reprint permission, please contact
Paul Goble, Publisher
Email: GobleP@rferl.org
Phone: 202-457-6947
Fax: 202-457-6992
Postal Address:  RFE/RL,  1201 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC  20036  USA
_________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE STAFF
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Laurie Belin, BelinL@rferl.org
* Jan Maksymiuk, MaksymiukJ@rferl.org
* Bruce Pannier, PannierB@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org

Freelance And Occasional Contributors
* Fabian Schmidt
* Matyas Szabo
* Pete Baumgartner
* Jeremy Bransten
* Jolyon Naegele
* Anthony Wesolowsky
* Julia Guechakov
* Floriana Fossato
* Benjamin Tromly

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630
_________________________________________________
RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY, PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole