If there is technological advance without social advance, there is, almost automatically, an increase in human misery. - Michael Harrington
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 2, No. 40 , Part II, 27 February 1998


___________________________________________________________
RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol 2, No. 40 , Part II, 27 February 1998

A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern Europe, Russia,
the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by the staff of Radio Free
Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning Central, Eastern, and
Southeastern Europe.  Part I covers Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is distributed simultaneously as a
second document.  Back issues of RFE/RL NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest
are online at RFE/RL's Web site:
http://www.rferl.org/newsline

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

POLITICIZATION AND SELF-CENSORSHIP IN THE RUSSIAN MEDIA
A new financial dependence on industrial or banking groups has led to a
noticeable erosion of media autonomy in Russia. This paper is available on
the RFE/RL Web site:
http://www.rferl.org/nca/special/rumediapaper/index.html

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Headlines, Part II

* RUSSIAN, UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTS MEET IN MOSCOW

* POLAND WANTS ACCESS TO LABOR MARKET UPON EU ENTRY

* BOSNIA SAYS SERBIA MAY HOLD SREBRENICA SURVIVORS

* End Note: BOSNIAN MERRY-GO-ROUND

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx


REGIONAL AFFAIRS

RUSSIAN, UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTS MEET IN MOSCOW. Boris Yeltsin and Leonid
Kuchma, meeting at the Kremlin on 27 February, signed an agreement on
economic cooperation through the year 2007, RFE/RL correspondents in Moscow
reported. That accord is aimed at doubling trade turnover between the two
countries, which totaled $14 billion in 1997. The two leaders also agreed
to cooperate in the construction of military transport planes, to ensure
quick ratification of agreements on the Black Sea Fleet, and to further
develop equal partnership and cooperation among CIS members. A
Russian-Ukrainian commission on military-technical cooperation is to be
formed, and the two countries will seek to promote Russian and Ukrainian
weapons on world markets. Kuchma received support from Yeltsin to meet in
Odessa with the president of Moldova and an unspecified representative of
the Transdniester to discuss the breakaway region. Kuchma also stressed
that Ukraine will not join NATO. BP

BLACK SEA STATES TO DISCUSS CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES. Bulgaria,
Georgia, Romania, Russia, Turkey, and Ukraine have drafted guidelines for
talks on confidence-building measures related to the activities of their
naval forces in the Black Sea, the "Turkish Daily News" reported on 27
February, citing a Turkish Foreign Ministry statement. The measures are
intended to strengthen economic, political, and military cooperation
between the states bordering the Black Sea. LF

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

UKRAINE SIGNS COOPERATION AGREEMENT WITH SOUTHERN NEIGHBORS... Officials
from Ukraine, Moldova, and Romania signed a cooperation treaty in Izmail,
Ukraine, on 26 February, Mediafax reported. The signatories to the
agreement pledged to protect ethnic minorities and to put aside territorial
disputes. The document, which was sponsored by the European Council, also
draws up free-trade zones and sets common policies on border traffic. PB

...FAILS TO AGREE WITH LATVIA OVER TARIFFS REDUCTION. Ukrainian Prime
Minister Valery Pustovoytenko and his Latvian counterpart, Guntars Krasts,
signed five cooperation agreements in Kyiv on 26 February but failed to
agree on the abolition of tariffs on some goods, BNS reported. A free-trade
agreement on many foodstuffs was signed. But Krasts was opposed to a
reduction of the 75 percent tariff on Ukrainian grain imports, while
Pustovoytenko insisted on maintaining a 20 percent duty on Latvian canned
fish products. Other agreements provided for cooperation in the
transportation and communications sectors. PB

LATVIA'S ULMANIS REJECTS AMENDED ELECTION LAW. Guntis Ulmanis has rejected
amendments to the law on general elections recently adopted by the
parliament, BNS reported on 26 February. Under the amended legislation,
political parties would have to receive 5 percent and coalitions 7 percent
of the vote to gain parliamentary representation. Ulmanis said he believes
that the existence of different thresholds for parties and coalitions would
lead to the unequal division of seats in the parliament. The amendments, he
added, are not favorable to the development of democracy and the political
system. More than one-third of deputies  had appealed to the president not
to sign the amendments (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 20 February 1998). JC

LITHUANIAN PRESIDENT WANTS EU, NATO ENTRY WITHIN FIVE YEARS.  Valdas
Adamkus, a former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency official who was
sworn in as Lithuanian president on 26 February, says he will strive for
Lithuania to join the EU and NATO by the end of his five-year term.
Addressing the parliament during his inauguration ceremony, Adamkus also
pledged to maintain friendly relations with neighboring states. In remarks
later to a crowd on Vilnius's  Cathedral Square, Adamkus announced he will
launch a "moral renewal program" and will invite the media and political
parties to help promote it. One day before his inauguration, Adamkus
renounced his U.S. citizenship. JC

POLAND WANTS ACCESS TO LABOR MARKET UPON EU ENTRY. The Polish Labor
Ministry on 26 February insisted that Polish citizens be allowed to work in
other EU countries as soon as Poland becomes a member of the union, Reuters
reported. Deputy Labor Minister Irena Boruta said that Poland will "demand
the principle of the free movement of labor" upon joining the EU and that
this view will be presented at entry talks with the union on 31 March.
German Ambassador to the EU Dietrich von Kyaw had said the previous day
that such access for Poles would be "unthinkable" immediately upon entering
the EU. With more than 12 percent of its work force unemployed, Germany
fears an influx of Polish workers flooding the EU and pushing up
unemployment even higher. PB

POLISH PRESIDENT ACCUSED OF DIVERTING COMMUNIST PARTY FUNDS. Aleksander
Kwasniewski is among three former Communist Party officials who have been
accused of diverting funds in 1990 that were to be returned to the state,
AFP reported on 26 February. Kwasniewski, current Socialist Democratic
Party (SDRP) leader Leszek Miller, and SDRP Treasurer Wieslaw Huszcza
deposited 10 million Swiss francs and $750,000 with a lawyer in Warsaw.
Such dealings in foreign currency were illegal in Poland at the time. The
money was to have been put in state coffers as Communist Party assets were
nationalized after the party's dissolution in 1990. Kwasniewski has refused
to comment on the charges, but Miller said  the funds were not returned but
were in zlotys. He claims the money was contributed by Communist Party
members working abroad and thus did not have to be turned over to the
state. PB

CZECH LOWER HOUSE VOTES TO DISSOLVE ITSELF IN JUNE. The Chamber of Deputies
on 26 February approved a constitutional amendment that cuts its term in
half and makes possible early elections by 30 June. The amendment, which
will not apply to future ballots, was submitted by the main opposition
party, the Social Democratic Party, and supported by 130 deputies against
43. The Senate has yet to approve the amendment. Also on 26 February,
Premier Josef Tosovsky said in the Chamber of Deputies that the Czech
Republic's entry into the EU should be decided by Czech citizens in a
referendum, noting that EU membership will affect daily life  more than
will  NATO entry. MS

CZECH SUPREME COURT WANTS STIFFER SENTENCE FOR SKINHEADS. The Supreme Court
on 26 February ruled that four skinheads who drowned a Romani man in 1993
in Pisek must be re-tried. The court said the light sentences handed down
to them last June constituted an "abuse of the law to the benefit of the
accused," CTK reported. Three of the skinheads received prison sentences of
22-31 months, while the fourth was given a two-year suspended term. MS

MECIAR SUPPORTERS TO RUN NEWSPAPER DISTRIBUTION. The largest newspaper
distribution group in Slovakia, PNS, has recently been sold to
Danubiaprint, which is run by businessmen close to Premier Vladimir
Meciar's Movement for a Democratic Slovakia (HZDS), AFP reported on 26
February. Danubiaprint produces both the HZDS mouthpiece "Slovenska
Republika"  and some of the leading opposition papers. Members of the
opposition claim the move is linked to preparations for the elections
scheduled in September. Milos Nemecek, the head of the Association of
Slovak Periodicals, said he will complain to the anti-monopoly authorities.
MS

NATO SECRETARY-GENERAL IN BUDAPEST. Javier Solana on 26 February met with
President Arpad Goncz, Premier Gyula Horn, Defense Minister Gyorgy Keleti,
and Foreign Minister Laszlo Kovacs. At a joint press conference with
Kovacs, Solana said Hungary has made a great contribution to regional
stability and will have to continue doing so as a member of NATO. He said
Hungary must make further progress in developing cooperation with NATO
members and in particular in perfecting links with the alliance's
communication and air defense system. He added that it is important that
membership does not lead to tensions in relations with Russia, Hungarian
media reported. MS

WORLD BANK LOAN TO HUNGARY. The World Bank on 26 February approved a $150
million loan for Hungary to support educational reform, Reuters reported. A
statement by the bank said the project aims at "developing a system of
education that responds to the nation's changed and changing economic
needs." In other news, Hungarian police on 26 February arrested a
27-year-old Kosovo Albanian, suspected to have assassinated media magnate
Janos Fenyo earlier this month, according to dpa. The Albanian is reported
to have carried out the murder under contract. MS

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIA SAYS SERBIA MAY HOLD SREBRENICA SURVIVORS. Muhamed Sacirbey,
Bosnia's ambassador to the UN, wrote to the Security Council on 26 February
that 50 survivors of the 1995 Srebrenica massacre may be secretly held in a
prison in Sremska Mitrovica. He asked the council to investigate reports by
two independent witnesses that they saw people from Srebrenica in the
prison along with a U.S. and a Pakistani citizen. Sacirbey added that
"apparently none of those Srebrenica prisoners is registered with the
International Committee of the Red Cross. They are held in isolation from
other prisoners, and it is not even clear to what extent the central
authorities in Belgrade may be aware of the circumstances." Some 7,000
former inhabitants of Srebrenica, mainly adult males, remain unaccounted
for and are presumed to have been massacred by General Ratko Mladic's
Bosnian Serb troops. PM

INDICTED SERB PLEADS NOT GUILTY. Simo Zaric, one of six Bosnian Serbs from
Bosanski Samac wanted by the Hague-based war crimes tribunal and who turned
himself in on 24 February, pleaded not guilty before the court on 26
February. Zaric said that hopes it will be  "easy for the tribunal to see
that Simo Zaric is honest and honorable and for the judges to decide that I
am innocent." PM

COMMERCIAL RAIL TRAFFIC RETURNS TO BOSNIA. A 30-wagon freight train made
the journey from Muslim-held Tuzla across Serb- and Croat-held areas to
reach the Croatian Adriatic port of Ploce, Bosnia's natural outlet to the
sea, on 26 February. The transportation ministries of the two entities
agreed earlier this month to resume rail traffic as soon as possible even
before they reach an agreement on setting up a new railway company. PM

MORE CROATIAN RESPONSE TO U.S. CRITICISM. Drago Krpina, a spokesman for
President Franjo Tudjman's governing Croatian Democratic Community (HDZ),
repeated his party's opposition to U.S. special envoy Robert Gelbard's
criticism of a recent speech by Tudjman (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 26 February
1998). Speaking in Zagreb on 26 February, Krpina said that "the tone and
manner in which Mr. Gelbard spoke about a president of a sovereign nation
is out of proportion and unacceptable.... A civil servant--albeit of the
United States--has no right in slapping the wrists of a president of a
sovereign nation in that manner." Krpina added that it was "outrageous"
that Gelbard spoke without first having read a transcript of Tudjman's
remarks. PM

CROATIAN MEDIA GROUP WANTS EDITORS OUT. Spokesmen for Forum 21, which
includes prominent journalists from the state-run and independent media,
said in Zagreb on 26 February that some top editors from state television
(HRT) who recently joined the governing body of the HDZ should resign their
media posts. Among those who took the political appointments is HRT
editor-in-chief Hloverka Novak-Srzic. The independent weekly "Globus" added
that "by [the appointments], the ruling party shows what it thinks about
demands made by European institutions to pull HRT from the party claws and
turn it into a proper public service broadcaster." The government holds a
near monopoly on the electronic media, especially television. HRT is widely
regarded as an HDZ mouthpiece. PM

YUGOSLAV ARMY DENIES KOSOVO BUILDUP. Major-General Nebojsa Pavkovic, the
commander of the Pristina region, rejected charges by opposition
politicians that the army has launched a military buildup in Kosovo, BETA
news agency reported (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 4 February 1998). He said in
Pristina on 26 February that he wants Kosovo to remain "an oasis of peace
and not of conflict." He noted nonetheless that the security situation has
worsened over the past year in the Glogovac-Srbica-Klina area on account of
the activities of "Albanian separatists [and] terrorists." Pavkovic also
criticized unnamed foreigners for allegedly encouraging Kosovo's secession
from Serbia. Meanwhile in Belgrade, Yugoslav Defense Minister Pavle
Bulatovic denied opposition reports of a mobilization on account of the
situation in Kosovo, "Danas" wrote. Finally, an army spokesman described
the border with Albania as Yugoslavia's "most problematic" frontier from a
security standpoint. PM

POLICE MAKE MORE ARRESTS IN HAJDARI AFFAIR. Police arrested three men in
Kukes on 26 February after they attempted to break through a police
roadblock. Police found four machine guns, 35 grenades, and 2,000 rounds of
ammunition in their car, "Gazeta Shqiptare" reported. One of the three is
an ethnic Albanian from Montenegro, while another comes from Tropoja and is
the brother of a man arrested after a recent armed clash between police and
supporters of the controversial Democratic Party legislator Azem Hajdari
(see "RFE/RL Newsline," 16 February 1998). A police spokesman said the
three are also suspected of having been involved in the unrest in Shkoder.
Meanwhile, the Justice Ministry named Mithat Havari, who was sacked as
Shkoder's police chief on 23 February, as national director of prisons. FS

NANO SAYS DEMOCRATS PROMOTE CRIME. Albanian Prime Minister Fatos Nano said
in Tirana on 26 February that he "never had doubts that the Democratic
Party serves as a breeding ground for crime, smuggling, corruption, and
other dubious practices," "Koha Jone" reported. He also charged that the
Democrats were  behind last weekend's unrest in Shkoder and  the recent
destruction of water pipes and other infrastructure (possibly an allusion
to the blast that crippled the water supply system in Kukes on 25
February). Meanwhile, several thousand Democratic Party supporters held
rallies in six central Albanian cities on 26 February, "Rilindja
Demokratike" reported. Speakers accused the government of having committed
unspecified "political crimes" and of being responsible for widespread
poverty. FS

ROMANIAN PREMIER RESPONDS TO DEMOCRATIC PARTY. Victor Ciorbea, in an open
letter addressed to former Democratic Party cabinet ministers,  said on 26
February that those ministers "initiated the game, established its rules,
played by yourselves, and lost more than you thought you would win."
Ciorbea said he had decided to break his  self-imposed silence and to
respond to a letter addressed to him by the former ministers on 2 February
because he realizes that nothing will make them stop the attacks whose
target he has become. He said that in their campaign against him, they
display "an energy that is surprising in view of your performance in the
cabinet," RFE/RL's Bucharest bureau reported. MS

ROMANIAN GOVERNMENT APPROVES 1998 PRIVATIZATION PROGRAM. The government on
27 February approved a program providing for the privatization of 2,745
enterprises this year, RFE/RL's Bucharest bureau reported. Privatization
Minister Valentin Ionescu withdrew his resignation  submitted one day
earlier, saying he is satisfied with the program. Also on 26 February,  the
Senate voted 86 to 57 to reject an opposition motion criticizing the
government for the deterioration of the health system. Meanwhile, the
leader of the Sanitas trade union announced on 26 February that the
paramedics' general strike, which began some two weeks ago, has been
"suspended" because "respect for patients must prevail." MS

GAZPROM TAKES 50 PERCENT SHARE OF MOLDOVAN GAS COMPANY. The parliament on
26 February approved the privatization of the Moldovagas company. Russia's
Gazprom is to be the largest shareholder, owning 50 percent of the
company's assets, whose total value is $285 million. Moldova owes Gazprom
$650 million, and the transfer of half of the new company's shares to
Gazprom is to cover part of that debt in line with an agreement reached in
Moscow in March 1997 by Prime Minister Ion Ciubuc and  Gazprom, RFE/RL's
Chisinau bureau reported. BASA-press said that of the remaining 50 percent
portfolio, the Moldovan government will own 35 percent the separatist
authorities in Tiraspol 14 percent, and private entrepreneurs 1 percent. MS

BULGARIA, RUSSIA TO COMBAT CD PIRACY. Returning from a visit to Moscow,
where he met his Russian counterpart Anatolii Kulikov, Bulgarian Interior
Minister Bogomil Bonev told BTA on 26 February that the two countries will
cooperate in the struggle against pirated compact discs and money
laundering. He said that Moscow is "swamped in pirated CDs and a large
share of them are Bulgarian-made." The two countries will also exchange
information on suspected money laundering in the real estate sector. Bonev
said that some Bulgarian "so-called businessmen imagine that Russia is a
paradise for those who committed crimes in Bulgaria." MS

END NOTE

BOSNIAN MERRY-GO-ROUND

by Patrick Moore

        The past few weeks have witnessed some remarkable developments in
Bosnia. New political constellations are taking shape, but it is unclear
whether they will last.
        The Bosnian Serbs were for many years international pariahs who
enjoyed close contacts only with Serbia, Greece, and Russia. But during the
time between last summer, when Republika Srpska President Biljana Plavsic
broke with Radovan Karadzic's supporters in Pale, and last month, when
reformer Milorad Dodik became prime minister, the Bosnian Serbs have become
the darlings of the international community. Scarcely a day seems to go by
without Dodik receiving a pledge of money or other aid from a foreign
diplomat or politician.
        The reason for the foreigners' generosity is that Plavsic and Dodik
have said they are committed to implementing the Dayton agreement. To show
their sincerity, the two have launched some basic reforms aimed at curbing
the hard-liners' hold on the economy, police, and army. Plavsic and Dodik
have also made it clear to foreign capitals that the moderate Bosnian Serb
leadership can survive only if some degree of prosperity and development
comes to the Republika Srpska, where the per capita income is approximately
$35 per month and the unemployment rate 70 percent.
        Their point has been well taken. Earlier this month, Plavsic
visited France and received all honors due to a head of state. When Alija
Izetbegovic, the Muslim member of the Bosnian joint presidency,
subsequently filed a formal protest with Paris and accused the French of
favoring the Serbs, hardly any European or North American political
commentator outside Izetbegovic's own Party for Democratic Action
sympathized with him. Instead, Izetbegovic was portrayed in the foreign
press as a bitter old man who is angry that he and his followers are no
longer the West's sole friends in Bosnia.
        Dodik, for his part, paid his first foreign visit not to Moscow or
Athens, but to Bonn. Given Germany's long-standing economic, political, and
social importance for all parts of the former Yugoslavia (it is no accident
that the new Bosnian joint currency is called the "convertible mark"), this
may not seem surprising. But if one recalls the vehemence of Serbian
propaganda against Germany since at least the 1991 breakup of the former
Yugoslavia,  Dodik's decision to go to Bonn is both remarkable and ironic.
        That irony appeared even more pronounced soon after Dodik left
Bonn. German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel visited Banja Luka and promised
substantial aid to his hosts. Plavsic praised him, saying: "it is good to
have a friend in the European Union who will defend our interests with
objectivity, and I think we have found a good friend." Such sentiments
would have been unthinkable from any Serbian leader anywhere in the former
Yugoslavia just a few months ago.
        Last week, Dodik was in Washington, where  Secretary of State
Madeleine Albright described him as a "breath of fresh air." Shortly
thereafter, Robert Gelbard, the U.S. special envoy for the former
Yugoslavia, went to Belgrade, where he praised Yugoslav President Slobodan
Milosevic for having shown "good will" and "a significant positive
influence" by backing Plavsic and Dodik. Gelbard did not, however, lift the
"outer sanctions" that still block Belgrade's full membership in the
international community; such a step will be taken only when Yugoslavia
becomes more democratic and finds a solution to the Kosovo question. But
Gelbard did bring some presents for Milosevic, including landing rights for
JAT airlines in the U.S. as well as the right to open a consulate in New
York.
        Gelbard had quite a different message, however, for Croatian
President Franjo Tudjman. Ever since Tudjman signed a U.S.-brokered peace
with the Muslims in early 1994, he has been fond of referring to his
"strategic partnership" with Washington. But early this week, Gelbard said
in Belgrade that a recent speech by Tudjman included territorial claims on
Bosnia, which Gelbard called  "outrageous, dangerous, and ridiculous." The
U.S. official also accused Tudjman of "violating the Dayton agreement."
        Shortly after, Carlos Westendorp, the international community's
chief representative in Bosnia,  urged Tudjman to fire the hard-line
Croatian mayor of Stolac, who is at least partly responsible for preventing
local Muslim refugees from returning home. Westendorp's spokesman said that
his boss has given Tudjman one week to get rid of the mayor or face a loss
of his political credibility.
        On 24 February, Izetbegovic's followers in the Bosnian government
finally gave in to long-standing international pressure and sent to the
parliament a law on property rights that will enable Croatian and Serbian
refugees to return to their flats in Sarajevo. The next day, however,
Tudjman's party, the Croatian Democratic Community, declared that Zagreb
will not be bullied by the "improper statements of foreign diplomats and
opposition leaders."  The party added that Tudjman had simply stated
historical facts about Bosnia "that cannot be denied."
        Meanwhile, foreign capitals will be watching to see what Dodik does
with his aid money and whether he succeeds in breaking the power base of
Radovan Karadzic's backers.


xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
               Copyright (c) 1998 RFE/RL, Inc.
                     All rights reserved.
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

SUBSCRIBING:
1) To subscribe to RFERL-L, please send a message to
        listserv@listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu
2) In the text of your message, type
        subscribe RFERL-L YourFirstName YourLastName

UNSUBSCRIBING:
1) To un-subscribe to RFERL-L, please send a message to
        listserv@listserv.acsu.buffalo.edu
2) In the text of your message, type
        unsubscribe RFERL-L

Current and Back Issues
Back issues of RFE/RL Newsline and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at:
http://www.rferl.org/newsline/search/

Listen to news for 18 countries
RFE/RL programs for countries in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central
Asia, Russia and the South Slavic region are online daily at RFE/RL's
24-Hour LIVE Broadcast
Studio.
http://www.rferl.org/realaudio/index.html

Reprint Policy
To receive reprint permission, please contact
Paul Goble, Publisher
Email: GobleP@rferl.org
Phone: 202-457-6947
Fax: 202-457-6992
Postal Address:  RFE/RL,  1201 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC  20036  USA

RFE/RL Newsline Staff:
* Paul Goble, Publisher, GobleP@rferl.org
* Liz Fuller, Editor-in-Chief, CarlsonE@rferl.org
* Patrick Moore, Team Leader, MooreP@rferl.org
* Laurie Belin, BelinL@rferl.org
* Bruce Pannier, PannierB@rferl.org
* Michael Shafir, ShafirM@rferl.org
* Jan Cleave, CleaveJ@rferl.org

Freelance And Occasional Contributors
* Fabian Schmidt
* Matyas Szabo
* Pete Baumgartner
* Jeremy Bransten
* Jolyon Naegele
* Anthony Wesolowsky
* Julia Guechakov

RFE/RL Newsline Fax: (420-2) 2112-3630

[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole