What the sick man likes to eat is his medicine. - Russian Proverb
RFE/RL NEWSLINE

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 1, No. 192, Part II, 9 January 1998



A daily report of developments in Eastern and Southeastern
Europe, Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia prepared by
the staff of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

This is Part II, a compilation of news concerning Central,
Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.  Part I covers Russia,
Transcaucasia and Central Asia and is distributed
simultaneously as a second document.  Back issues of RFE/RL
NewsLine and the OMRI Daily Digest are online at RFE/RL's
Web site: http://www.rferl.org/newsline

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Headlines, Part II

* SPLIT IMMINENT IN KLAUS'S ODS?

* KOSOVO LIBERATION ARMY WARNS MACEDONIA

* CONTACT GROUP TELLS BELGRADE TO ACT ON
KOSOVO

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EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

UKRAINIAN INFLATION FALLS. Inflation in Ukraine fell
to 10.1 percent in 1997, the lowest level since that country
became independent, the State Statistical Committee told
ITAR-TASS on 8 January. That represents a steep decline
from an inflation rate in 1993 of more than 10,000 percent.
The government predicts that the economy will begin to
grow by 0.5 percent this year, the first positive growth
since independence. In another move with economic
consequences, the cabinet said it will abolish value-added
tax on Russian goods as of 1 February if the Russian
government does the same on Ukrainian ones. PG

KYIV DENOUNCES PLANS TO "NEW UNION TREATY."
Presidential administration chief Yevgenii Kushnarov has
described plans by communist groups from former Soviet
republics to sign a new union treaty in Kyiv on 7 February
as a publicity stunt, Interfax reported on 8 January.  He
noted that no one can speak on behalf of countries except
the duly constituted authorities. PG

ORT JOURNALIST'S TRIAL RESUMES IN BELARUS.  On
8 January, the trial of Russian Public Television journalist
Pavel Sheremet and his cameraman, Dmitriy Zavadskiy,
resumed in the Belarusian city of Oshmany, Interfax
reported. In a much-delayed case that has soured relations
between Moscow and Minsk, the two are charged with
illegally crossing the Lithuanian-Belarusian border.  One
witness, border guard officer Igor Korovkin, said the two
continued to film the border even after being ordered not to.
Korovkin added, however, that they had not in fact crossed
the border, as charged.  PG

BELARUS DOES NOT WANT RUSSIAN TROOPS ON ITS
SOIL. Belarusian Deputy Foreign Minister Nikolai Buzo said
on 8 January that Belarus does not want Russian troops
stationed on its territory, Interfax reported. Instead, Buzo
said, Minsk wants Moscow to "make full use of Belarus's
military potential" as the two countries  move toward full
integration.  He added that the two governments would
discuss the issue at the Belarus-Russia Union Higher Council
on 22 January. On a related matter, Buzo said that Minsk
was opposed to any delay in the next summit of the
Commonwealth of Independent States (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 8 January 1998).  PG

BELARUSIAN "CHARTER 97" OPENS BRUSSELS OFFICE.
The organizers of Charter 97, a group seeking to oust
Belarusian President Alyaksandr Lukashenka, opened their
first office abroad on 7 January, RFE/RL's Belarusian service
reported. The office is located in the Belgian capital. Andrei
Sannikau, a former deputy foreign minister, will serve as the
group's representative there. Charter 97 has already
collected some 40,000 signatures since it was launched two
months ago.  PG

ESTONIAN COALITION POSTPONES DECISION ON
TARIFFS. Leaders of the ruling coalition on 8 January
decided to postpone taking a decision on customs tariffs
until the conclusion of membership talks with the World
Trade Organization, ETA reported. Last month, the
government announced it would not impose customs tariffs
on EU member states. Some politicians from the agricultural
parties in favor of protective tariffs argue  that this decision
will have a negative effect on talks with the WTO, which
Estonia hopes to join later this year. JC

LATVIAN CENTRAL BANK HEAD PREDICTS
CONTINUED ECONOMIC GROWTH. Bank of Latvia
President Einars Repse has predicted that the country's
economy will grow at a rate similar to--or possibly higher
than--that in 1997, BNS reported on 8 January He forecast
GDP growth at some 6 percent and stressed that tough fiscal
policies will encourage the maintenance of a balanced
budget, preventing the inflation rate from exceeding 7
percent. JC

MORE PEOPLE NATURALIZED IN LATVIA IN 1997. A
total of 2,994 people were naturalized in Latvia last year
compared with 3,999 for both 1995 and 1996, BNS reported
on 8 January. Eizenija Aldermane, the head of the
naturalization department, attributed that increase to the
fact that people below the age of 25 years can now apply for
citizenship and  to the government's decision to reduce
naturalization fees for certain categories of applicant.
Aldermane also estimated that a total of 121,000 non-
citizens who were entitled to apply for naturalization last
year did not do so. JC

LITHUANIA'S PAULAUSKAS CONCEDES DEFEAT.
Arturas Paulauskas, who lost the 4 January runoff of the
presidential election to U.S.-Lithuanian Valdas Adamkus by
some 11,000 votes, has conceded defeat but criticized
election officials, BNS and Reuters reported on 8 January.
Paulauskas aide Gintautas Kniukshta said that on 9 January,
the former prosecutor will congratulate Adamkus on his
victory. But he said "it is a pity that the election commission
did all it could to give grounds to doubt the result."
Paulauskas had asked for a recount in some 40 polling
stations, citing violations of voting procedures. But the
electoral commission agreed only to recount in 26 stations,
as a result of which 100 votes were added to Paulauskas's
tally. JC

POLISH PARLIAMENT APPROVES VATICAN TREATY.
By a vote of 274 to 160, the Solidarity-dominated
parliament on 8 January gave final approval to a Concordat
with the Vatican, PAP reported. The agreement, signed by
the earlier Solidarity-led government in 1993, was not
ratified when the former Communists dominated the
parliament.  Opponents of the measure said the agreement's
provision on the role of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland
would cause further social divisions.  PG

POLAND IMPOSES RESTRICTIONS AT RUSSIAN
BORDER.  Polish border guards on 6 January refused to
allow Russian tourists to cross from Kaliningrad into Poland
unless they could prove that they had paid for hotel
accommodations in advance, ITAR-TASS reported two days
later. Earlier, Russian tourists had been able to cross the
border simply by presenting easily available tourist visas.
Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Valerii Nesterushkin
said that Moscow was seeking "exhaustive official
information" on Poland's unilateral action and would take all
necessary steps to defend the rights of Russian citizens. PG

SPLIT IMMINENT IN KLAUS'S ODS? Finance Minister
Ivan Pilip on 8 January resigned from the Civic Democratic
Party (ODS), while retaining his seat in Josef Tosovsky's
cabinet, CTK reported. Pilip said he will soon decide on his
future political activities. According to "Lidove noviny,"
former Interior Minister Jindrich Vodicka has decided to
leave the ODS in March. Local Development Minister Jan
Cerny said on Czech Television that he will decide by the end
of the week whether to follow Pilip's example. On the other
hand, Labor and Social Affairs Minister Stanislav Volak said
he did not see any reason to follow in Pilip's footsteps. MS

HAVEL'S COMMUNIST RIVAL MEETS WITH PRESS.
Stanislav Fischer, who so far is Vaclav Havel's only rival in
the Czech presidential elections, told journalists on 8 January
that he is a "realist" who recognizes that "with the present
composition of the legislature," he cannot expect to succeed,
"Lidove noviny" reported. Fischer is endorsed by the
Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia (KSCM).
Meanwhile, extremist Republican Party leader Miroslav
Sladek may well miss the 20 January presidential election.
Prague district court president Lubomir Novak said Sladek,
who is being prosecuted for incitement to hatred, will not be
released from prison before 23 January. He will also be
unable to attend a meeting, planned by Social Democratic
Party leader Milos Zeman for 11 January,  with other
political leaders to decide on the date of early elections. MS

MECIAR WANTS NO CONTACT WITH NEW CZECH
GOVERNMENT. Slovak Premier Vladimir Meciar on 9
January told a rally of his Movement for Democratic Slovakia
in Bratislava that he will "by no means negotiate" with the
new Czech government. He said the Czech political crisis
arouses "great worries in Slovakia, as it is something we
have already experienced here." Alluding to his own
cabinet's dismissal in March 1994, Meciar said Czech
developments were an attempt "to ascribe responsibility for
failures to one person and one party," CTK reported. "We are
witnessing efforts to oust not only Klaus but the whole of his
party and to divide [that party] into smaller groups and
promote [Josef] Lux as the leading Czech politician." MS

SLOVAKIA DECLINES TO RESPOND TO HUNGARIAN
CRITICISM. A Foreign Ministry spokesman on 8 January
said the ministry has decided "not to comment" on the
critical remarks made by Hungarian Foreign Minister Laszlo
Kovacs in Budapest one day earlier, Reuters reported..
Kovacs said that unlike relations with Romania, relations
with Slovakia did not improve in 1997. He  said Slovakia has
not gone far enough in meeting the demands of its national
minorities and that, in general, progress in bilateral relations
has been "disappointing." Slovak Foreign Minister Zdenka
Kramplova is due to visit Hungary in January.  MS

ALBANIAN REFUGEES DETAINED IN SLOVAKIA. Forty-
seven refugees from Albania were detained in Slovakia after
crossing the border from Hungary in an attempt to reach
West European countries, ITAR-TASS reported on 9 January.
A police officer said the refugees will be deported back to
Hungary, whose authorities will have to decide on their fate.
MS

HUNGARIAN FINANCE MINISTRY RELEASES
MACROECONOMIC INDICATORS. Hungary's GDP grew by
some 4 percent in 1997, while the government budget
deficit reached 4.6 percent of GDP (compared with the
originally planned 4.9 percent), Finance Minister Peter
Medgyessy told Hungarian media on 8 January. According to
the ministry's estimates,  inflation was 18.2-18.3 percent
last year, he said. Meanwhile, data released by the
Hungarian National Bank show a drop in the current account
deficit, from $1.177 billion in 1996 to $613 million in
November 1997. The current account even registered a
surplus of $72 million in November, but the current account
deficit for 1997 as a whole is expected to be $1-1.2 billion.
MSZ

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

KOSOVO LIBERATION ARMY WARNS MACEDONIA.
Spokesmen for the clandestine Kosovo Liberation Army
(UCK) told the Pristina daily "Koha Ditore" of 9 January that
the UCK carried out three recent bombings in Macedonia.
The spokesmen said the bombings were a warning to the
Macedonian police not to cooperate with their Serbian
counterparts in a joint crackdown against the UCK.
Macedonian, Kosovar, and Albanian officials have expressed
doubt about the validity of a statement by the UCK on 7
January claiming responsibility for the Macedonian
bombings (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 8 January 1998). PM

ARMY TO STAY OUT OF MONTENEGRIN IMBROGLIO?
Montenegrin government officials told Reuters on 8 January
that  Yugoslav Army Chief-of-Staff General Momcilo Perisic
"exchanged New Year greetings with...[reform-minded
President-elect Milo] Djukanovic [and that] the general also
exchanged cards with [representatives of the pro-
Djukanovic] Montenegrin police. This formality indicates that
the army is not willing to back Yugoslav President Slobodan
Milosevic in pressuring Montenegro" (see also "End Note"
below). PM

SUPPORT FOR SERBIAN TEACHERS IN KOSOVO. Serbian
Education Minister Jovo Todorovic said in Belgrade on 8
January that he will increase Serbian teachers' salaries in
Kosovo by 20 percent in recognition of the "difficult
conditions under which the teachers work." He added,
however, that the resumption of Albanian-language
education there is a "political question on which I have no
authority to act," "Nasa Borba" reported. PM

CONTACT GROUP TELLS BELGRADE TO ACT ON
KOSOVO... Representatives of the U.S., U.K., Germany,
France, and Russia urged the Serbian authorities in a
statement released in Washington on 8 January to "make
concrete progress" in improving the political and human
rights situations in Kosovo. The statement said that such
progress is a prerequisite for federal Yugoslavia's return to
active participation in the international community. The
Contact Group said that it favors neither independence for
Kosovo nor a continuation of the status quo but rather an
improvement in Kosovo's status within Yugoslavia. PM

...AND ISSUES WARNING ON BOSNIA. In another
statement issued in Washington on 8 January, the Contact
Group told the Bosnian Muslims, Serbs, and Croats that
"further temporizing will not be tolerated." The
representatives of the five countries urged the Bosnian
Serbs to form a new government quickly and to broadcast
parliamentary sessions live. The text called for an end to
delays in appointing joint ambassadors and in implementing
the results of last year's local elections, in which refugees
were able to elect officials for towns from which they had
been "ethnically cleansed." PM

KLEIN BACKS PLAVSIC'S PRIME MINISTER. Jacques
Klein, one of the international community's chief
representatives in Bosnia, said in Banja Luka on 8 January
that the international community urges the Bosnian Serbs to
support Mladen Ivanic, who is Republika Srpska President
Biljana Plavsic's nominee for prime minister (see "RFE/RL
Bosnia Report," 7 January 1998). Klein added that the
international community "considers Ivanic as an exceptional
character.... In this critical time for the Serbian people, those
of good will who are real patriots have to step forward and
assume their historic role." Hard-line supporters of Radovan
Karadzic have rejected Ivanic's proposed national unity
government of technocrats. PM

PEACEKEEPERS TO ENFORCE FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT?
A spokesman for Carlos Westendorp, the international
community's chief representative in Bosnia, said in Sarajevo
on 8 January that peacekeepers and international police will
block any attempts to interfere with public transportation
across the border between the Republika Srpska and the
mainly Muslim and Croatian federation. The announcement
follows a recent incident in which Bosnian Serb officials
arrested two bus drivers from Sarajevo who were driving on
a scheduled trip to Banja Luka, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported from the Bosnian capital. The spokesman added
that Klein has sent a letter to the federal and Bosnian Serb
transportation ministers to demand the restoration of a
regular bus service between the two cities. PM

SARAJEVO GETS NEW MAYOR. The Sarajevo City Council
elected Rasim Gacanovic of the leading Muslim Party of
Democratic Action (SDA) mayor on 8 January. The council
also chose Ante Zelic of the Croatian Democratic Community
(HDZ) as his deputy. The elections end a 22 month-long
stalemate caused by the SDA's refusal to share power with
several other parties. The opposition parties finally agreed
to support Gacanovic because of his reputation as a
pragmatist. PM

TUDJMAN PLEDGES MORE DEMOCRACY. Croatian
President Franjo Tudjman said in Zagreb on 8 January that
the return of eastern Slavonia to full Croatian control on 15
January will mean Croatia can concentrate its efforts on
building democracy and improving its economy. He was
speaking at a ceremony to honor William Dale Montgomery,
the new U.S. ambassador to Croatia, who said that Croatia
must become fully democratic. Montgomery added that
"Croatia is absolutely critical for two of the major foreign
policy objectives of the United States--firstly, the full
implementation of the Dayton agreement and secondly, the
establishment of long-term peace and stability in this
region." PM

THOUSANDS TURN OUT FOR ALBANIAN DEMOCRAT'S
FUNERAL. Some 5,000 people on 8 January attended the
funeral in central Tirana of Abdyl Matoshi, a policeman and
former deputy national customs chief, who was recently
killed in Tropoja by unknown gunmen (see "RFE/RL
Newsline," 7 January 1998). The funeral took on the  aspect
of a Democratic Party political rally, an RFE/RL
correspondent reported from Tirana. The Democrats  blame
the Socialist Party and the government for the killing of
Matoshi. Two other Democrats who were killed the same day
in Tropoja were buried in their respective hometowns. FS

ALBANIAN GOVERNMENT COALITION ANNOUNCES
"ANTI-CRIME PACT." The five-party governing coalition
announced on 8 January a number of measures to combat
the growing crime wave, "Dita Informacion" reported. The
parties pledged to pass new laws giving the judiciary and
police greater powers to fight organized crime and terrorism.
They also agreed to develop a  strategy to disarm the
civilian population, which is still in possession of an
estimated 600,000-800,000 illegal weapons. The parties
promised to form a permanent parliamentary commission to
fight organized crime. Further measures are designed to help
families of policemen who lost their lives in duty and to
combat corruption within the judiciary and police. FS

ROMANIAN COALITION'S FUTURE HANGS IN
BALANCE. In a televised address on 8 January, Petre
Roman, the leader of the Democratic Party,  warned his
coalition partners "not to play with fire," RFE/RL's Bucharest
bureau reported. Roman said his party wants neither the
dismemberment of the coalition nor early elections, but he
reproached his allies for  treating the Democrats as an
"annex" of the other parties. The coalition, Roman said, "will
either be one of equal partners or will not be at all."  Roman
said the main differences go far beyond the "particular case
of [dismissed Transportation Minister Traian] Basescu" and
that the discussions scheduled to take place "in the next
days"  will show whether the partnership is still possible.  In
response, government spokesman Eugen Serbanescu said
Premier Victor Ciorbea believes it is Roman, rather than the
government, who  "is playing with fire." MS

EBRD PROVIDES LOAN FOR ROMANIAN PORT.  The
European Bank for Construction and Development on 8
January announced it will provide a $13 million loan for new
grain-handling and storage facilities at Romania's Black Sea
port of Constanta, an RFE/RL correspondent in London
reported. The loan will be used for the construction of a sea-
port terminal that will have a grain storage capacity of
100,000 tons and facilities for handling road and rail freight.
MS

MOLDOVA'S INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL
CREDIBILITY DWINDLES. Moldova received international
credits worth $227 million last year, according to a report by
the Economy and Reform Ministry, cited by Radio Bucharest
on 8 January. The World Bank lent Chisinau $129 million
and the IMF $20 million. The fund's loans for 1997 were
only one-quarter of the amount it granted  Moldova in 1994.
The reason for the reduced credit is Chisinau's failure to
meet the fund's conditions on monetary, budgetary,  and
fiscal policies as well as on the country's external debt. Last
year, Moldova also received  international technical
assistance worth  $104 million. MS

BULGARIAN PREMIER RELEASES TAPES ON 1997
CRISIS. Ivan Kostov on 8 January released transcripts
documenting a meeting of the former socialist government
following the January 1997 mass demonstrations and the
storming of the parliament by protesters. The transcripts
reveal that former Prime Minister Zhan Videnov advocated
the use of police force to break up the protests on 10
January. Videnov also discussed how reports by state and
private media can be silenced and how the media was to be
later blamed for instigating the protests. More than 300
people were hospitalized on the night of 10 January 1997,
when police attacked the protesters demanding the
resignation of the government. The release of the tapes
comes two days ahead of a Socialist rally marking what the
main opposition party says was a "black day for Bulgarian
democracy", an RFE/RL correspondent in Sofia reported. MS

BULGARIAN-RUSSIAN PARLEYS ON GAS DELIVERIES.
A delegation of the state-owned gas company Bulgargas
began talks in Moscow on 8 January with Gazprom officials
on energy imports for households and on the transit of
Russian gas deliveries through Bulgaria to Macedonia, Serbia,
Greece, and Turkey, an RFE/RL correspondent in Sofia
reported. Vassil Filipov, the head of the Bulgarian delegation,
said Gazprom's foreign trade subsidiary, Gazexport, has
indicated its readiness to sign two contracts on 9 January.
But Kiril Gegov, the deputy chairman of Bulgaria's State
Energy Committee, refused to comment on that statement.
MS

REGIONAL AFFAIRS

UKRAINE PROHIBITS RUSSIAN FLIGHT TO
TRANSDNIESTER. The Ukrainian authorities prohibited on
8 January a military transport plane to overfly Ukrainian
territory between the Russian Federation and Tiraspol
because Moscow has not paid for the use of the air corridor,
the Russian command in Moldova's Transdniester region told
ITAR-TASS on 8 January. Russian military flights have been
using this route on a daily basis for some time, but the
Russian authorities have indicated they would use regular
commercial flights in the future.  PG

END NOTE

TENSIONS RISE IN MONTENEGRO AND KOSOVO

by Patrick Moore

        Policies of Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic have
recently led to a dramatic rise in tensions in Montenegro and
Kosovo. The question is whether the outcome will be violent.
        Milosevic enters 1998 with a major political difficulty
in Serbia out of the way. The victory of his ally Milan
Milutinovic in last month's Serbian presidential vote ensures
that the Serbian government will do Milosevic's bidding for
the next several years. Although Milutinovic's ultra-
nationalist opponent, Serbian Radical Party leader Vojislav
Seselj, will continue to be a major figure in Serbian politics,
the levers of power will be well out of his reach.
        Three other potential sources of trouble for Milosevic
nonetheless remain, beginning with the power struggle
among the Bosnian Serbs. The hard-liners loyal to Radovan
Karadzic are blocking attempts by Prime Minister-designate
Mladen Ivanic--the nominee of Republika Srpska President
Biljana Plavsic -- to form a government of technocrats with
all-party support.
        It seems clear, however, that neither Bosnian Serb
faction is strong enough to decisively defeat the other. The
stalemate is likely to continue for some time, which will
enable Milosevic to use the divide-and-rule tactics he has
often applied with quarrelsome Serbian politicians in Croatia
and Bosnia. Ivanic told RFE/RL recently that the current
political in-fighting among the Bosnian Serbs reminds him
very much of the debilitating political struggle among the
Croatian Serbs shortly before the fall of the Republika
Srpska Krajina in 1995.
        The Yugoslav president faces a situation in his second
trouble spot, Montenegro, that could pose a more direct
threat to his power than does the imbroglio among the
Bosnian Serbs. Montenegro and Serbia form the Federal
Republic of Yugoslavia, and an independent-minded
Montenegrin government could undermine his plans to
strengthen his presidential powers at the expense of the
individual republics.
        His ally in Podgorica, President Momir Bulatovic, lost
the 19 October  presidential vote to Milo Djukanovic. The
new head of state wants autonomy from Belgrade and an
end to international sanctions, which have crippled the tiny
mountain republic's tourist and shipping industries.
Djukanovic argues that Milosevic wants to run Montenegro
like a colony and that his policies are responsible for the
hated sanctions.
        Milosevic seems unwilling to accept the result of the
Montenegrin vote and has turned up the pressure on
Djukanovic in the runup to the 15 January Montenegrin
presidential inauguration. The pro-Milosevic media have
sought to intimidate Djukanovic, whom they wrongly accuse
of seeking outright independence for Montenegro. The
Belgrade courts, for their part, have questioned the validity
of the October vote.
        More seriously, there have been strong suggestions
from the Bulatovic camp that the former president's
supporters may resort to violence rather than yield power to
their rivals. Djukanovic and the pro-reform Montenegrin
government expect Milosevic to use his time-honored tactic
of bussing in well-paid, armed demonstrators from outside
Montenegro to intimidate the new government or even to
prevent it from taking office.
        It is unclear, however, whether Milosevic is prepared
to use violence to keep Bulatovic in office or whether he is
simply trying to bully Djukanovic. The Belgrade daily "Nasa
Borba" wrote on 7 January that Milosevic has accepted
defeat and plans to name Bulatovic as Yugoslav foreign
minister. But Djukanovic's allies in the Montenegrin
government are taking the hard-liners' threats of violence
seriously. The reformers have also promised to stage a
referendum on independence if Milosevic tries to end
Montenegro's constitutional equality with Serbia in the
federation.
        The third problem confronting Milosevic is Kosovo. He
has kept the restive mainly ethnic Albanian province under
tight police control since he abolished its autonomy in 1989.
The moderate Albanian leadership under shadow-state
President Ibrahim Rugova, for its part, continues to advocate
non-violence and seeks foreign support. Rugova, however,
has achieved nothing in his quest to restore Kosovo's
autonomy.
        Over the past year, the clandestine Kosovo Liberation
Army (UCK), has become bolder in its attacks on government
and police buildings, Serbian officials, and ethnic Albanians
whom the UCK considers collaborators. Many observers
report that the UCK has captured the imagination of many
young Kosovars, who regard Rugova's policies as having
reached a dead end.
        The UCK, moreover, may have won political and
military as well as psychological victories. On 28 November,
some of its uniformed, armed members felt confident
enough to deliver a political speech in public. On 4 January,
the UCK issued a declaration saying that the armed struggle
for the liberation of Kosovo and its unification with Albania
has begun. And Belgrade's BETA news agency reported this
week that the town of Srbica and some other areas are now
firmly in UCK hands, at least under the cover of darkness.
        There may be signs, however, that Milosevic is
planning to intervene in Kosovo with massive force, as he
did in Croatia in 1991 and in Bosnia the following year. Some
media reports suggest that the departure of Serbian police
from Srbica and several other communities in Kosovo could
be a prelude to an intervention by the Yugoslav army or by
paramilitaries like Zeljko Raznatovic, better known as
"Arkan." The military or Arkan might claim real or imagined
UCK violence as a pretext for waging war on the local
Albanian population and for conducting a policy of "ethnic
cleansing."

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