Peace is indivisible. - Maxim Litvino
OMRI DAILY DIGEST

No. 198, Part II, 11 October 1995

This is Part II of the Open Media Research Institute's Daily Digest.
Part II is a compilation of news concerning Central, Eastern, and
Southeastern Europe. Part I, covering Russia, Transcaucasia and Central
Asia, and the CIS, is distributed simultaneously as a second document.
Back issues of the Daily Digest, and other information about OMRI, are
available through OMRI's WWW pages: http://www.omri.cz/OMRI.html

CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

UKRAINIAN PROSECUTOR-GENERAL TENDERS RESIGNATION. Vladyslav Datsiuk,
Ukrainian prosecutor-general, has submitted his resignation to President
Leonid Kuchma, saying persistent interference by the parliament in his
office's activities made it impossible for him to continue, Interfax-
Ukraine and Ukrainian TV reported on 10 October. Kuchma must accept his
resignation in order for it to take effect. Lawmakers and the president
have locked horns over Datsiuk, with the legislature twice voting to
fire him. Kuchma supported Datsiuk in his battle with the parliament by
issuing a decree confirming him in his post. Datsiuk has led several
high profile investigations into alleged criminal activities by top
lawmakers who have claimed his actions are politically motivated. --
Chrystyna Lapychak

UKRAINE OPPOSES DEPLOYING NUKES NEAR ITS BORDERS. Ukrainian Foreign
Minister Hennadii Udovenko criticized statements by politicians in
Eastern Europe welcoming the deployment of NATO nuclear weapons on their
territory, ITAR-TASS reported on 10 October. Udovenko categorically
opposed the deployment of such weapons anywhere close to Ukraine's
borders, saying he hoped NATO would not implement the idea since it
would complicate the situation in Eastern Europe and threaten improving
relations with Russia. Moscow is opposed to any deployment of nuclear
weapons close to its borders, while Ukraine worries about becoming a
buffer zone between Russia and Europe. -- Ustina Markus

UKRAINIAN STUDENTS AGAINST CLOSING SCHOOL MILITARY UNITS. Reuters on 10
October reported that 1,000 Ukrainian university students demonstrated
against closing army sections in their schools. The closure of the
school military sections are part of the plan to reduce Ukraine's armed
forces from 470,000 to 350,000 by the end of the decade. Students are
opposed to the closure because it would mean they could no longer avoid
serving an 18-month tour in the army after they finish their studies.
Students who were officers at their school's military section do not
have to serve in the armed forces after completing their studies. --
Ustina Markus

ESTONIAN PREMIER EXPECTS INTERIOR MINISTER TO RESIGN. Tiit Vahi, during
an official visit to Denmark on 10 October, said he expected Edgar
Savisaar to resign because of charges that he was involved in the
electronic bugging of top political leaders, Reuters reported. The
leaders of the three main opposition parties issued a joint statement
calling for the resignations of both Vahi and Savisaar for not
fulfilling their duties as leaders of the state after Savisaar failed to
attend a cabinet meeting he was supposed to chair. The assertion by
Vilja Laanaru, a Savisaar advisor, that she had made the recordings
without Savisaar's knowledge is not generally believed. -- Saulius
Girnius

UPDATE ON LATVIAN PARLIAMENT ELECTIONS. The Latvian Central Electoral
Commission on 10 October finally released an unofficial list of deputies
who were elected to the sixth Saeima, BNS reported. No explanation for
the long delay in announcing the results of the voting on 30 September-1
October was given and the results might even change slightly after the
inclusion of votes from abroad in the Riga district. Only 40 of the 100
new deputies were members of the fifth Saeima. The number of deputies
with dual citizenship has fallen from 18 to three, while the number of
women deputies has declined from 14 to eight. -- Saulius Girnius

POLISH GOVERNMENT ON CONCORDAT. The Polish government on 10 October
debated the draft of a joint declaration with the Episcopate on the
Concordat, which has been awaiting ratification since July 1993 when it
was signed by Hanna Suchocka's government. The current government
considers that the Concordat was signed too hastily at the time. The
main points of contention are the requirement to inform Birth,
Marriages, and Death Registration Offices about Church marriages; the
burial of non-believers in Church- administered cemeteries, religious
instruction in kindergartens, and government financing of the Papal
Theological Academy in Krakow, Polish press reported on 11 October. --
Jakub Karpinski

CZECH INFLATION IN SEPTEMBER. Following two months of zero inflation,
consumer prices in the Czech Republic rose 0.9% in September, the
Statistics Office announced on 10 October. Increases in meat prices and
heating accounted for much of the rise. Compared with September 1994,
inflation is 8.6%. In the first three quarters of 1995, prices have
risen 5.9%, but Czech National Bank officials said they expected
inflation to increase in the final quarter to give a figure of 9%-10%
for the whole of 1995. -- Steve Kettle

ROMANI COUPLE ATTACKED IN CZECH REPUBLIC. Some 10 skinheads armed with
baseball bats and heavy sticks attacked a Romani couple who were waiting
for a bus in Breclav on 7 October, Nova TV reported two days later. Both
sustained serious head injuries, and the man had an eye removed in a
Brno hospital. Nova TV said Breclav Roma were angry that the police were
not offering them better protection. Four of the attackers, aged 16-21,
have been charged with violence and assault, CTK reported on 10 October.
-- Alaina Lemon

SLOVAK EXTRAORDINARY PARLIAMENT SESSION LASTS SEVEN MINUTES. An
extraordinary parliament session on 10 October was cut short when
deputies failed to approve the opposition's proposed agenda, Slovak
media reported. The session was called by the opposition to address the
conflict between the police and the Slovak Information Service over the
abduction of the president's son. Of the 141 deputies present, 62 voted
in favor and 69 against, while nine coalition deputies abstained.
Following the vote, parliament chairman Ivan Gasparovic terminated the
session, and opposition parties called a meeting. Three opposition
groups--the Democratic Union, Christian Democratic Movement, and
Hungarian coalition--issued a joint statement demanding that Interior
Minister Ludovit Hudek support the police force, which came under attack
from SIS director Ivan Lexa after police investigators connected SIS
agents with the case. -- Sharon Fisher

PRESIDENT SUES SLOVENSKA REPUBLIKA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF. President Michal
Kovac's office on 10 October filed a complaint with the prosecutor-
general charging Slovenska Republika editor-in-chief Jan Smolec with
slander in connection with the paper's publication of two bank
statements allegedly for an account held by the president. Gerhard
Karasek, spokesman of the Raiffeisen Zentralbank AG, told TASR on 10
October that both bank statements were forged. Smolec responded to
Karasek's statement by saying he understands every bank "protects its
client," especially one with deposits over 23 million schillings. A
Narodna obroda report on 11 October showed that the statements were
clearly typed on two different typewriters and that the word "account
number" was used in two different forms. -- Sharon Fisher

CABINET RESHUFFLE IMMINENT IN HUNGARY? Labor Minister Magda Kosa-
Kovacs's resignation has triggered widespread speculation that a major
reshuffle of Hungary's coalition cabinet is imminent, Reuters reported
on 10 October. The Socialist minister resigned over cabinet moves to
push through the Socialist-majority parliament a sick leave plan ruled
unconstitutional by the Constitutional Court (see OMRI Daily Digest, 9
October 1995). She told Hungarian journalists that she does not doubt
the professional integrity of any minister but that she believes the
Finance Ministry's "excessive powers" are causing severe operational
difficulties. Justice Minister Pal Vastagh, who is also a member of the
Socialist Party, threatened to quit if the cabinet continued to push
through the controversial sick leave plan. Socialist ministers have been
increasingly critical of the cabinet since the severe austerity package
was launched in March. -- Zsofia Szilagyi

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

ALLIES CLOSE IN ON BANJA LUKA. Reuters on 11 October reported that the
allied forces of the Bosnian government, the Bosnian Croats, and Croatia
have taken two key western Bosnian towns. With the fall of Mrkonjic Grad
and Sanski Most, the way again appears open for a thrust toward the
Bosnian Serb stronghold of Banja Luka. Novi list quoted the chief of the
Bosnian general staff, General Ferid Buljubasic, as praising the
effectiveness of the cooperation between the three allies. Meanwhile in
Sarajevo, water and power have been or are being restored, as demanded
by the government. The Bosnian Serbs on 10 October said they were ready
to implement the ceasefire at one minute after midnight on that day or
the next but had no authorization to accept the government's offer of
implementation on 12 October. Clarification is expected soon. -- Patrick
Moore

CROATS FIND MASS GRAVE IN KRAJINA. The BBC on 10 October quoted UN
officials as saying they fear that the Serbs in western Bosnia will now
panic and flee as they did in Krajina in early August, setting off
another mass exodus. Novi list on 11 October cited remarks by UN
spokesman Chris Jankowski about his concern that many Muslim and
Croatian men in northern Bosnia have been killed by Serbian units under
the command of internationally wanted war criminal Zeljko Raznatovic
"Arkan." Reuters the previous day said that Croatian officials have
unearthed the mass grave of up to 50 elderly Croats, killed by the Serbs
in 1991. Two eye-witnesses of the massacre were present at the
exhumation in Petrinja. -- Patrick Moore

YASUSHI AKASHI RESIGNS. The latest UN special negotiator for the former
Yugoslavia has taken his hat, telling the BBC that he and the UN have
been made scapegoats for the intractable nature of the conflict. Akashi
will be replaced by another prominent UN official who has dealt with the
region, Ghana's Kofi Annan. The Bosnian government welcomed Akashi's
departure, telling Reuters on 10 October: "Akashi's replacement can only
bring a change for the better, and it could be the beginning of a new
phase of better relations between the Bosnian government and the UN.
Given Akashi's past record, especially his persistence in equating the
victim and aggressor, one can understand why the Bosnian government
welcomes this decision." -- Patrick Moore

CROATIAN OPPOSITION BLASTS GOVERNMENT TV. The election coalition of five
opposition parties held a press conference on 8 October to protest the
decision by Croatian Television (HRTV) to treat them as a coalition,
rather than five separate parties. They are now entitled to only one
bloc of free air-time. Election Commission President Krunislav Olujic
said that since they have not been legally registered as a coalition,
the opposition parties have the right to present themselves individually
in the electronic media, Slobodna Dalmacija reported on 11 October. The
leading opposition Croatian Social Liberal Party (HSLS) also protested
HRTV's ban on its video clips, which TV officials called "meaningless,"
HINA reported on 11 October. The HSLS's clips have also been banned by
the company that owns most movie theaters. -- Daria Sito Sucic

SLOVENIAN-ITALIAN COMPROMISE. Slovenian Foreign Minister Zoran Thaler
said on Slovenian TV that the contents of a Slovenian-Italian compromise
proposal could lead to improved bilateral relations, BETA reported on 10
October. For his part, Thaler remarked that Slovenia was prepared to
"return to Italy" some 40 housing units that had belonged to ethnic
Italians forced to leave Slovenia in the wake of World War II. He added
that a full resolution of all outstanding questions was bound to the
issue of the status of Italy's ethnic Slovenian minority. -- Stan
Markotich

ROMANIAN NATIONALIST GENERAL DISMISSED FROM ARMY. Paul Cheler, commander
of the Fourth Transylvanian Army, has been dismissed and placed on
reserve, Romanian media reported on 10-11October. Cheler is well known
for his extreme nationalist, particularly anti-Hungarian, views. At a
press conference in Cluj on 9 October (which in itself is a breach of
the military code), Cheler protested his dismissal and attacked the
reforms under way in the Romanian army. His remarks were reminiscent of
a letter published last summer by 300 military in the weekly of the
extreme nationalist Greater Romania Party. The letter, which some media
speculate was inspired by Cheler, was considered to be an instigation to
revolt against President Ion Iliescu, whom the signatories accused of
undermining the Romanian army. Cheler threatened to sue those
responsible for his dismissal for allegedly failing to observe army
regulations that generals placed on reserve must be announced six month
ahead of their retirement. -- Michael Shafir

UPDATE ON ILIESCU CONFLICT WITH EXTREME NATIONALISTS. Evenimentul zilei
on 11 October reported that the Prosecutor-General's office has opened
an investigation into articles published in Romania mare and Politica by
Corneliu Vadim Tudor, the leader of the Greater Romania Party (PRM). The
office is to decide whether to recommend to lift Tudor's parliamentary
immunity, making possible his prosecution for having offended President
Ion Iliescu. Curierul national reports that Oliviu Gherman, chairman of
the Party of Social Democracy in Romania, and Ion Solcanu, a vice
chairman of the party, are in favor of ending the alliance with the PRM.
-- Michael Shafir

SZUROS ON HUNGARIAN MINORITY IN ROMANIA. Matyas Szuros, Hungary's first
post-communist president and currently leader of the Hungarian
parliamentary delegation to the Inter-Parliamentary Union conference in
Bucharest, said the 2 million ethnic Hungarians are fighting for their
survival in Romania, Radio Bucharest reported on 10 October. He noted
that Romania's new education law discriminated against ethnic Hungarians
and was a step backward in comparison with previous laws. He went on to
say that the "historic reconciliation" between Hungary and Romania "is
inconceivable as long as there is no reconciliation between the Romanian
majority and ethnic Hungarians." Interviewed by Reuters, Szuros spoke of
ethnic Hungarians' collective rights and recommended the creation of
"enclaves" in eastern Transylvania, where Hungarians form a compact
majority. -- Matyas Szabo

MOLDOVAN STUDENTS TO RESUME STRIKE. Moldovan students and teachers are
to resume their strike on 18 October to demand the government's
dismissal, strike chairman Anatol Petrencu told Infotag on 10 October.
The student strike began last spring, with the initial demand to rename
the official language from "Moldovan" to Romanian; later, economic and
social claims were made. After President Mircea Snegur submitted to the
parliament his initiative on renaming the official language, the
students suspended their strike. The moratorium on protest actions
introduced in the spring cannot continue because the government is
ignoring the strikers' economic demands, Petrencu said. -- Matyas Szabo

HUNGARIAN PRESIDENT IN BULGARIA. Arpad Goncz arrived in Sofia on 9
October for an official three-day visit, Bulgarian and Hungarian media
reported the following day. "Both Bulgaria and Hungary wish to
participate in the post-war reconstruction of the former Yugoslavia,"
Goncz and his Bulgarian counterpart, Zhelyu Zhelev, said following the
first day of talks aimed at strengthening bilateral ties. During
discussions on EU membership, Goncz said Hungary would share with
Bulgaria its experience in negotiating with European organizations and
could assist in Bulgaria's admission to CEFTA and other European
organizations. Zhelev said that, instead of competing, the two countries
must help each other to achieve integration into European structures. --
Zsofia Szilagyi and Stefan Krause

EU GIVES ALBANIA $22 MILLION GRANT. The European Union has approved 17.5
million ecu ($22 million) grant to Albania as part of the PHARE regional
development program. It will be used, among other things, to improve
economic and social conditions. Meanwhile, President Sali Berisha said
his government has to step up the pace of economic reform to ensure
success for the Democratic Party in the spring 1996 parliamentary
elections. Reuters the previous day quoted him as praising "great
economic changes in Albania, especially the resolution of foreign debt,
rises in average salaries, privatization and production." -- Fabian
Schmidt

GREECE TO LIFT EMBARGO ON MACEDONIA ON WEEKEND. Greek government
spokesman Tylemachos Hytiris has announced that Athens will lift its
blockade on Macedonia on 15 October, Reuters reported on 10 October.
Talks in Skopje between Greek and Macedonian officials on measures
regarding trade and the movement of citizens "are being completed," he
said. Greece has sent police officers to Macedonia to help investigate
the assassination attempt on Macedonian President Kiro Gligorov.
Gligorov's condition, according to Nova Makedonija on 11 October,
continues to improve and an operation on his right eye went "according
to plan." He remains in intensive care, however. Meanwhile, the
country's Security Council issued a statement saying the country is
stable and its politics remain on course--under tightened security. --
Stefan Krause

TURKISH PREMIER-DESIGNATE PRESENTS GOVERNMENT PROGRAM. Tansu Ciller on
10 October presented her minority government's program to the
parliament, Turkish and international media reported the same day. The
five principle aims are a new election law, democratization, the
revision of Article 8 of the constitution (which bans separatist
propaganda), privatization, and anti-corruption measures. Ciller also
wants to conclude Turkey's customs union deal with the EU. She said her
government was committed to a comprehensive dialogue with Greece to
resolve outstanding problems. Meanwhile, the Confederation of Turkish
Labor Unions (Turk-Is) rejected Ciller's latest pay raise offer and
called a rally to coincide with the vote of confidence in the premier-
designate on October 15. -- Lowell Bezanis

[As of 12:00 CET]

Compiled by Jan Cleave

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            Copyright (C) 1995 Open Media Research Institute, Inc.
                             All rights reserved. ISSN 1211-1570


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