Men stumble over the truth from time to time, but most pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing happened. - Sir Winston Churchill
OMRI DAILY DIGEST

No. 138, Part II, 18 July 1995

This is Part II of the Open Media Research Institute's Daily Digest.
Part II is a compilation of news concerning East-Central and
Southeastern Europe. Part I, covering Russia, Transcaucasia and Central
Asia, and the CIS, is distributed simultaneously as a second document.
Back issues of the Daily Digest, and other information about OMRI, are
available through OMRI's WWW pages: http://www.omri.cz/OMRI.html

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

UKRAINE SAYS IT WILL SEND MORE TROOPS TO FORMER YUGOSLAVIA. Volodymyr
Yelchenko, head of the Ukrainian Foreign Ministry's UN Department, has
said his ministry has asked the parliament to increase the number of
Ukrainian peacekeepers in the former Yugoslavia to 3,000, international
agencies reported on 17 July. His statement came at a time when Ukraine
was working out a plan to evacuate 79 Ukrainian peacekeepers from the
besieged Bosnian enclave of Zepa if necessary. Despite the willingness
to increase troop levels, Yelchenko voiced displeasure with UN leaders
for putting Ukrainians at risk, singling out Yasushi Akashi and Thorvald
Stoltenberg. Ukraine already has 1,200 troops in Bosnia and Croatia. A
dozen Ukrainians have been killed there since 1992. -- Ustina Markus,
OMRI, Inc.

UKRAINE ACCUSES RUSSIA OVER NUCLEAR FUEL RODS. AFP on 17 July reported
that Ukrainian Deputy Foreign Minister Kostyantyn Hryshchenko has
accused Russia of failing to deliver nuclear fuel rods to Ukraine as
laid down by the January 1994 trilateral agreement between Ukraine,
Russia, and the U.S. Russia is to supply Ukraine with approximately $1
billion worth of nuclear fuel rods in compensation for the strategic
materials in nuclear warheads removed from Ukraine to Russia. According
to Hryshchenko, Russia's suspension of deliveries has forced Ukraine's
nuclear power plants to rely on emergency stocks. Ukrainian Defense
Minister Valerii Shmarov reportedly discussed the problem of fuel
supplies from Russia during a recent visit to the U.S. -- Ustina Markus,
OMRI, Inc.

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENTIAL CONSULTANT ON SLOW PACE OF LAND REFORM. Vasyl
Shepa, a consultant to Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma on agriculture,
has blamed the leftist bloc in the parliament for the slow pace of land
reform, Radio Ukraine reported 17 July. Shepa told Radio Ukraine that
the Left has deliberately blocked not only a number of crucial bills but
also amendments to Ukraine's land code needed to speed up the
privatization of land belonging to loss-making collective and state
farms. He said the Communists and Socialists, as well as many
agricultural enterprise managers, are opposed to breaking up the
collectives, which are a heavy financial burden on the ailing economy.
They also refuse to allow individual farmers to freely buy and sell land
or to use it as collateral for credit. He said that as a result, land
privatization could be delayed by three years. -- Chrystyna Lapychak,
OMRI, Inc.

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENT IN BELARUS. Leonid Kuchma arrived in Minsk on 17
July to meet with his Belarusian counterpart, Alyaksandr Lukashenka,
Ukrainian Radio reported. The two presidents signed a comprehensive
agreement on friendship and cooperation that will serve as the basis of
future bilateral relations. Accords were also signed on citizens working
and residing in the other country, the terms for changing to the
residency of the other country, air links, and cooperation in health
care and medical services. -- Ustina Markus, OMRI, Inc.

LITHUANIA DEFENDS EXECUTION. BNS on 15 July reported that Lithuania has
carried out its seventh execution since independence. Mafia boss Boris
Dekanidze was executed on 12 July for the premeditated murder of
journalist Vytas Lingys, who had reported on Dekanidze's gang. The
execution was criticized by Amnesty International. Government spokesman
Vilius Kavaliauskas responded that while capital punishment was not
exemplary of good democracy, its abolition was not on the agenda. He
added it was considered a good weapon against organized crime. -- Ustina
Markus, OMRI, Inc.

POLISH PRESIDENT VETOES PRIVATIZATION BILL. Lech Walesa on 17 July
vetoed the Sejm bill on the privatization and commercialization of state
enterprises (see OMRI Daily Digest, 3 July 1995). He criticized the
Sejm's control over privatization and the possibility that
commercialization will not lead to privatization, Rzeczpospolita
reported on 18 July. It was the 23rd time that he has vetoed a bill
since taking office and the fifth time in 1995. The Sejm needs a two-
third majority to overrule the president's veto. So far this year, it
has succeeded three times in securing such a majority. -- Jakub
Karpinski, OMRI, Inc.

CORRUPTION REPORT GIVEN TO POLISH PRESIDENT, PREMIER. Walesa and Premier
Jozef Oleksy on 17 July received a classified report on corruption among
state officials and their links with the criminal underworld,
Rzeczpospolita reported on 18 July. The report, handed over by Internal
Affairs Minister Andrzej Milczanowski, allegedly says that banks,
ownership transformation, taxes, and customs duties are most endangered
by criminal links. -- Jakub Karpinski, OMRI, Inc.

CZECH REPUBLICAN PARTY RESPONSIBLE FOR "SUDETEN LEAFLETS." The extreme
right Republican Party ordered the printing of leaflets that claimed an
agreement has been reached on rehabilitating Sudeten Germans in the
Czech Republic, Czech media reported. Up to 1 million leaflets
containing a bogus statement from German Chancellor Helmut Kohl (see
OMRI Daily Digest, 17 July 1995) were distributed in the Czech Republic.
Mlada fronta dnes quoted the head of a Prague printing firm as saying
the order was placed by Republican Party Deputy Chairman Jan Vik.
Justice officials said the authors of the leaflets could be prosecuted
for "spreading alarmist news" and sentenced to three years in jail. --
Steve Kettle, OMRI, Inc.

DEMOCRATIC UNION CRITICIZES SLOVAK PARLIAMENT. The opposition Democratic
Union has criticized the work of the Slovak parliament as a "tyranny of
the majority," Sme and Narodna Obroda reported on 18 July. It also
alleged that recent changes to the privatization law could be anti-
constitutional. Meanwhile, the controversy over whether the DU collected
the 10,000 signatures legally needed to take part in last fall's
elections continues. DU Chairman Jozef Moravcik on 13 July told a press
conference that the party has begun legal action to stop distribution of
a publication that includes copies of the electoral lists, including
personal data on signatories. -- Steve Kettle, OMRI, Inc.

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

WHERE ARE THE MISSING 15-20,000 MUSLIMS? The Guardian on 18 July and AFP
the previous day say that some 15-20,000 Muslims from Srebrenica remain
missing. UN High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata said the Serbs
should clarify the fate of the refugees, most of whom are civilian
males. She noted that from the onset, Serbian war crimes have been
committed systematically as part of a definite strategy. Reuters on 18
July reported that some 4,000 Bosnian government soldiers out of a group
of 10,000 survived a Serbian ambush, mine fields, and a 12-hour battle
to complete a six-day trek across Serbian territory to reach Tuzla.
Refugees described hysteria and suicides among people who feared falling
into Serbian hands. But Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic's adviser,
Jovan Zametica, said that "allegations of torture, murder, rape, and
deportation of Muslim civilians are made repeatedly without any
independent verification. The truth is that none of these things have
happened." -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

SERBS CLOSE IN ON ZEPA. Bosnian Serb forces have moved to within about 1
kilometer from the center of the "safe area" at Zepa and launched a
major mortar attack at mid-morning on 18 July. Nasa Borba said that the
Serbs threaten to attack Ukrainian peacekeepers unless NATO stops its
overflights. The Ukrainians, Reuters added, are making their weapons
inoperative to prevent the Bosnian government soldiers from using them
against the Serbs. Government troops last weekend took some of the
peacekeepers' weapons in order to defend the UN-declared "safe area"
themselves. -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

BOSNIAN FOREIGN MINISTER SAYS UN MUST GO. The VOA on 18 July quotes
Mohamed Sacirbey as saying that the UN's role has come to an end in his
embattled republic and that it should go voluntarily or be shown the
door. He did not explicitly rule out the UN's remaining under a changed
mandate, however. Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic meanwhile offered
Bosnian Serbs direct talks on evacuating the sick and wounded from Zepa.
Momcilo Krajisnik, the number three man in Karadzic's team, said "we
will answer this in an official way." -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

WASHINGTON, LONDON BLOCK PARIS'S PLAN TO HALT SERBS. A meeting of the
international Contact Group's foreign and defense ministers will take
place on 21 July in London, following the failure of the British,
French, and U.S. military leaders to work out a joint strategy for
Bosnia. The International Herald Tribune on 18 July wrote that France
wants "a bold military initiative" to stop the Serbs from taking Gorazde
and to open a supply road to Sarajevo but that Britain and the U.S. are
opposed. AFP noted that the White House fears involvement on the ground
but admits it will have to provide some "non-combat" ground forces if
U.S. helicopters are used to ferry in British and French units.
Washington is also against continuing the cumbersome joint UN-NATO
command system, while France wants it kept since Paris does not belong
to NATO's command structure. France, meanwhile, has accused the Bosnian
government of "sabotaging" the Rapid Reaction Force by attaching too
many conditions to its deployment. (See related item in Russian
section.) -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

FIGHTING CONTINUES AROUND OSIJEK. Serbian forces over the weekend
attacked Croatian troops and UN peacekeepers near Osijek, in eastern
Slavonia, killing two. Nasa Borba and Croatian media on 18 July reported
that the combat is continuing. Osijek is not far from Serbian-held
Slavonian territory that Belgrade is believed to want to keep at any
cost because of its oil and agriculture. * Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

ARKAN DENIES POLITICKING IN KRAJINA. Zeljko Raznatovic, alias Arkan, the
internationally wanted war criminal and leader of the notorious
paramilitary Tigers, has denied allegations in Nasa Borba on 18 July
that his fighters are in Serb-occupied Croatia at the behest of Serbian
President Slobodan Milosevic. In response to suggestions that his forces
have intervened in the Republic of Serbian Krajina's political affairs,
Arkan observed: "We are no political police, [and] we are here
voluntarily and our mission is to defend the Serbian people from
genocide . . . not to mix in politics." -- Stan Markotich, OMRI, Inc.

LARGEST TRIAL EVER ENDS IN KOSOVO. The trial of 72 ethnic Albanian
former policemen ended in Kosovo on 17 July with the sentencing of 69
defendants to between one and eight years in prison, Kosova Daily Report
said the same day. The policemen were accused of forming an "Interior
Ministry of the Republic of Kosovo" as part of an effort to separate the
southern Serbian region from rump Yugoslavia. The trial brings the
number of former policemen sentenced on the same charge to 101. The
defendants denied the charges, saying they formed an independent police
union to protect their rights after 3,500 policemen were fired in 1991.
Some 44 ethnic Albanian policemen are still on trial in Prizren, while
32 have been sentenced to prison terms in Pec and Gnjilan. -- Fabian
Schmidt, OMRI, Inc.

MONTENEGRIN WEEKLY'S ADS CENSORED. Zoran Jocovic, director-general of
Radio and TV Montenegro, has banned the broadcasting of advertisements
by the independent Montenegrin weekly Monitor, Montena-fax reported on
14 July. Jocovic reportedly defended the decision on the grounds that
the advertisement contains objectionable material. Monitor has suggested
that the decision was motivated by political considerations and that
Jocovic wants to improve his own political fortunes. This latest move
may be a renewed attempt to put the weekly out of commission. The
government has already jailed several Monitor journalists (see OMRI
Daily Digest, 16 May 1995). -- Stan Markotich, OMRI, Inc.

SLOVENIA, POLAND SIGN FREE TRADE DEAL. Slovenian Minister for Foreign
Economic Relations Janko Dezelak and his Polish counterpart, Jacek
Buchacz, signed an agreement in Ljubljana on 17 July abolishing import
duties between the two countries, AFP reported the same day. As of 1
January 1996, some 70% of trade between the countries will be duty free,
with the remainder becoming exempt over the following two years. Poland
is the last of the so-called Visegrad countries to conclude such an
arrangement with Ljubljana. -- Stan Markotich, OMRI, Inc.

MACEDONIA, ALBANIA AGREE TO LIFT VISA PAYMENTS. Gazeta Shqiptare on 15
July reported that Macedonia and Albania have agreed to drop DM 40
payments for visas and to unify the countries' requirements for studying
at universities. Agreement was reached during a visit to Macedonia by
Albania's parliamentary Commission on Foreign Policy. The accord on
higher education was prompted by the large number of Macedonia's ethnic
Albanian citizens studying in Albania. Meanwhile, Albanian and Croatian
diplomats reached an agreement in Tirana on procedures for issuing visas
as a first step toward their abolition, Montena-fax reported on 15 July.
-- Fabian Schmidt, OMRI, Inc.

ROMANIA REACTS TO EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT RESOLUTION. The Romanian
government, responding to the European Parliament's resolution
condemning infringements of human and minority rights (see OMRI Daily
Digest, 17 July 1995), has said it is "surprised and puzzled" by the
resolution. In a statement carried by Romanian TV, the government said
the resolution was adopted at the initiative of Otto von Habsburg, who
is "well known for his repeated anti-Romanian positions." The document
by no means reflects the "evolution of Romanian society on the road to
democracy in the last years," the statement continued. With regard to
the EP's position on the new education law, the government said that
body had been "misinformed" and had responded to a draft law that
differed from the final version. The resolution was an "undeserved
insult" toward the Romanian people, it noted. -- Michael Shafir, OMRI,
Inc.

ROMANIAN DIPLOMATIC ACTIVITY. Foreign Minister Teodor Melescanu in
Strasbourg on 17 July signed the European Council's Charter for Regional
or Minority Languages, Radio Bucharest reported. Romania is the eleventh
state to become a signatory to that document. Only three states among
the signatories--Finland, Hungary, and Norway-- have so far ratified the
charter, which must be approved by at least five states in order to come
into force. Adrian Nastase, chairman of the Chamber of Deputies, began a
three-day visit the same day to rump Yugoslavia to meet with his Serbian
and Montenegrin counterparts. Meanwhile, Albanian Prime Minister
Aleksander Meksi began a three-day official visit to Romania where he
held talks with his Romanian counterpart, Nicolae Vacaroiu. Finally, a
NATO delegation headed by Turkish General Husseyin Kivrikoglu, commander
of Land Southeast Europe, began talks on 17 July with Romanian army
chiefs on a military exercise codenamed "Cooperative Determination" to
take place in Transylvania in September. NATO and troops from countries
that signed the Partnership for Peace program will participate in the
maneuvers. -- Michael Shafir, OMRI, Inc.

ANDRONIC ON NEW POLITICAL SITUATION IN MOLDOVA. Nicolae Andronic, deputy
chairman of the Moldovan parliament, said President Mircea Snegur may be
elected leader of the new Party of Rebirth and Conciliation (see OMRI
Daily Digest, 17 July 1995). Andronic, who heads the group of 11
deputies who defected from the Democratic Agrarian Party of Moldova,
said he will "personally make this proposal," Radio Bucharest reported
on 17 July. According to Infotag, Andronic also said discussion of
Moldovan independence was "worthless" if citizens have no food. He
explained that Moldovan statehood depends on the well-being of the
population, which may otherwise "look over the fence" to the CIS or
Romania. -- Michael Shafir, OMRI, Inc.

BULGARIA, TUNISIA SIGN TRADE AGREEMENT. Bulgaria and Tunisia on 15 July
signed a trade accord, AFP reported the same day. Tunisian Foreign
Minister Habib ben Yahia, the first Arab foreign minister to visit Sofia
since 1990, met with Prime Minister Zhan Videnov and Trade Minister
Kiril Tsochev to discuss boosting bilateral trade, which fell from an
estimated $45 million in 1990 to $10.4 million in 1994 but, according to
Tsochev, increased in the first half of 1995. Cultural, scientific, and
technical accords were also signed, as well as an agreement between the
two countries' foreign ministries. Ben Yahia requested that Bulgarian
engineers and doctors go to work in his country. -- Stefan Krause, OMRI,
Inc.

RUSSIAN ARMS FOR BULGARIAN PROPERTY? Russia is reported to have offered
Bulgaria 360 T-72 tanks and 12 MiG-29 jet fighters in return for
Bulgarian bonds exchangeable for property, according to 24 Chassa on 17
July. The paper said MiG-MAPO--the Moscow company that builds the MiG-
29--wants to acquire hotels on Bulgaria's Black Sea coast and is
offering planes worth $500 million. The value of the tanks is still
being negotiated. Russia last month agreed to give Bulgaria 100 T-72
tanks and other military equipment to avoid having to destroy them to
comply with the European conventional arms treaty. -- Doug Clarke, OMRI,
Inc.

U.S.-ALBANIAN MILITARY EXERCISES. As part of the U.S.-Albanian military
exercises that will continue until 8 September, a coastal exercise
codenamed Sarex 95-2 began on 18 July, Koha Jone reported the same day.
Albanian and U.S. military officials claim that the maneuvers have a
humanitarian character only. Koha Jone, however, noted that the
maneuvers may be regarded as practice for stationing US troops in Bosnia
and for possible evacuations from the area. -- Fabian Schmidt, OMRI,
Inc.

BOSNIAN SERB HEALTH MINISTER IN GREECE. Dragan Kalinic has arrived in
Athens to appeal for food and medical resources, AFP reported on 17
July. He said that more than 300 doctors have left hospitals on Bosnian
Serb territory and that fuel and food are increasingly rare. In an
interview with the Greek daily Elevtheropypia, Kalinic said he favored
"a fair division of the territory and the population [in Bosnia] because
there is no longer any possibility of Muslims, Croats, and Serbs living
together." With regard to the fall of Srebrenica, he said that the
enclaves "were safe areas only on paper" and that the "majority of
attacks against Serbs took place from them." -- Stefan Krause, OMRI,
Inc.

[As of 12:00 CET]

Compiled by Jan Cleave

The OMRI Daily Digest offers the latest news from the former Soviet
Union and East-Central and Southeastern Europe. It is published Monday
through Friday by the Open Media Research Institute. The OMRI Daily
Digest is distributed electronically via the OMRI-L list. To subscribe,
send "SUBSCRIBE OMRI-L YourFirstName YourLastName" (without the
quotation marks and inserting your name where shown) to
LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
No subject line or other text should be included.
To receive the OMRI Daily Digest by mail or fax, please direct inquiries
to OMRI Publications, Na Strzi 63, 140 62 Prague 4, Czech Republic; or
electronically to OMRIPUB@OMRI.CZ
Tel.: (42-2) 6114 2114; fax: (42-2) 426 396

OMRI also publishes the biweekly journal Transition, which contains
expanded analysis of many of the topics in the Daily Digest. For
Transition subscription information send an e-mail to TRANSITION@OMRI.CZ

            Copyright (C) 1995 Open Media Research Institute, Inc.
                             All rights reserved.


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