What you can become, you are already. - Friedrich Hebbel
OMRI DAILY DIGEST

No. 129, Part II, 5 July 1995

This is Part II of the Open Media Research Institute's Daily Digest.
Part II is a compilation of news concerning East-Central and
Southeastern Europe. Part I, covering Russia, Transcaucasia and Central
Asia, and the CIS, is distributed simultaneously as a second document.
Back issues of the Daily Digest, and other information about OMRI, are
available through OMRI's WWW pages: http://www.omri.cz/OMRI.html

EAST-CENTRAL EUROPE

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENT RESHUFFLES GOVERNMENT . . . Leonid Kuchma on 3 July
appointed a new government, dropping his top reformer from the roster,
international and Ukrainian agencies reported the same day. Kuchma told
Radio Ukraine that his decision to dismiss First Deputy Prime Minister
Viktor Pynzenyk did not mean a change in the course of economic reform
but represented a shift away from strict monetarism toward deep
restructuring of industry. Kuchma replaced Pynzenyk with another market
reformer, Roman Shpek. Shpek's deputy, Vasyl Hureyev, replaces him as
minister of economics. As part of an anti-crime and corruption campaign,
Kuchma named Vasyl Durdynets as the new deputy premier for state
security and as head of a presidential committee on corruption and
organized crime. He also moved former Interior Minister Volodymyr
Radchenko to head the Ukrainian Security Service and appointed his
deputy the new interior minister. Kuchma reduced the number of deputy
prime ministers from nine to five. The ministers for foreign affairs,
finances, defense, education, environment and nuclear safety, foreign
economic relations and trade, the Cabinet of ministers, statistics,
forestry, as well as the chairman of the State Property Fund have
retained their posts. -- Chrystyna Lapychak, OMRI, Inc.

. . . AND ENDS VISIT TO GERMANY. Kuchma ended his three-day visit to
Germany on 4 July, Radio Ukraine reported. He met with Chancellor Helmut
Kohl, President Roman Herzog, Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel, and a
number of industrialists and businessmen in an attempt to attract German
investment. Germany is Ukraine's second-largest Western trading partner
after the U.S., with investments totaling $64 million. A number of
agreements were signed, including ones on preventing double taxation and
on cooperation in environmental matters. The issue of Ukrainians of
German descent who have returned to Ukraine from Kazakhstan and are
living in extreme poverty, despite financial aid from Bonn, was also
raised. -- Ustina Markus, OMRI, Inc.

PROGRESS ON LATVIAN-ESTONIAN SEA BORDER DISPUTE. Latvian Prime Minister
Maris Gailis on 3 July announced that the Gulf of Riga will be divided
between Latvia and Estonia, LETA reported the following day. Gailis said
Latvia has stopped claiming that the gulf waters are inland waters,
while Estonia has renounced its unilaterally declared sea borders.
Gailis said he hoped the matter would be fully resolved by the fall. He
also said that at the meeting of Nordic and Baltic prime ministers last
week an agreement was reached between Latvia and Lithuania on seeking
international arbitration in their sea border dispute. -- Ustina Markus,
OMRI, Inc.

LITHUANIA APPROVES LAW ON REFUGEES. BNS on 4 July reported that the
Lithuanian parliament passed a law on the status of refugees in
Lithuania to take effect once it is signed by the president. The law
states that foreigners who need protection or face the risk of
persecution in their own countries may be granted refugee status. Asylum
will be denied to people convicted of crimes against humanity and peace
as well as serious non-political offenses. It will also be denied to
those who threaten Lithuania's security, are infected with dangerous
diseases, or refuse to submit to a medical examination. The law commits
Lithuania to readmitting refugees who leave the country and are deported
from Western countries. -- Ustina Markus , OMRI, Inc.

CONTINUED QUARREL OVER POLAND'S CONSTITUTIONAL DRAFT. President Lech
Walesa's representatives on the parliament's Constitutional Commission
resigned on 4 July after the president's 21 June statement criticizing
his lawyers for preparing a "socialist draft." The presidential
spokesman said Walesa had recalled his representatives. Representatives
of the Freedom Union had demanded the previous day that the commission's
work be postponed until the presidential campaign is over, while
representatives of the ruling Democratic Left Alliance had demanded that
its work be accelerated. Aleksander Kwasniewski, head of the commission
and a presidential candidate, said "some election or other is always
under way, and the time is ripe for Poland to have a constitution," the
Polish press reported on 5 July. -- Jakub Karpinski, OMRI, Inc.

GDANSK PRIEST APOLOGIZES FOR SERMON. Father Henryk Jankowski, who in an
11 June sermon referred to "people who did not say whether they come
from Moscow or Israel" and commented that "the star of David is
inscribed in the symbols of the swastika and hammer and sickle," has
sent a letter to Gdansk Archbishop Tadeusz Goclowski saying he was
rightly criticized by his superiors for those remarks. He added that
referring to the Jewish nation's most holy symbols within the context of
this century's criminal ideologies was "a wrong done to Jews and a great
abuse for which I wholeheartedly apologize," Polish media reported on 5
July. -- Jakub Karpinski, OMRI, Inc.

CZECH PREMIER IN PORTUGAL. Vaclav Klaus, on a two-day visit to Lisbon
from 3-4 July, met with Portuguese Prime Minister Anibal Cavaco Silva
and other officials, Czech media reported. Their talks centered on
expansion of the European Union. Klaus told a press conference that the
Czech Republic is ready to begin serious discussions about possible
entry into the EU after the 1996 EU intergovernmental conference. An
aide to Klaus told Radio Alfa that a formal application to join the EU
could be made by the end of this year. Ministers have so far declined to
specify a date for applying. -- Steve Kettle, OMRI, Inc.

POPE ENDS VISIT TO SLOVAKIA. More than 500,000 people on 3 July attended
an open-air mass in Levoca celebrated by Pope John Paul II at the end of
his four-day visit to Slovakia, international and Slovak media reported.
Attending the mass were Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar and
President Michal Kovac, with whom the Pope had met the previous day in
Bratislava. Kovac and the pontiff discussed the political situation in
Slovakia and again expressed the hope that the latter's visit will help
calm the political atmosphere in Slovakia. Meciar informed John Paul II
that the Russian Patriarch has accepted his offer to visit Slovakia.
Meciar and the Pope focused mainly on Church-state relations. -- Jiri
Pehe, OMRI, Inc.

SLOVAK DELEGATION IN ISRAEL. A delegation headed by Slovak Parliamentary
Chairman Ivan Gasparovic on 3 July met with Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzak Rabin and Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, Slovak media reported.
Rabin noted that Slovakia has not only distanced itself from "negative
deeds" of the past but also apologized to the Jewish nation for the
suffering Jews experienced in Slovakia during World War II. He praised
Slovakia for restituting Jewish property. Peres told the Slovak
delegation that he appreciates what the Slovak parliament and government
have done for the Jewish community in Slovakia since 1989. The Israeli
and Slovak sides also discussed bilateral cooperation. -- Jiri Pehe,
OMRI, Inc.

RUSSIAN ARMS FOR HUNGARIAN BORDER GUARDS. The Hungarian Border Guards
will receive Russian armored personnel carriers, anti-tank missiles, and
other military equipment worth $58 million, ITAR-TASS reported from
Budapest on 4 July. The deal will cover part of Russia's $900 million
debt to Hungary and include small arms, night-vision devices, and
bullet-proof vests. The agency said it was told that the Russian
supplies would be the largest re-equipment of the border service this
century. Nevertheless, the service would like another $22 million deal
with Russia. -- Doug Clarke, OMRI, Inc.

SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN SERBS THREATEN TO TAKE MORE HOSTAGES. International media on 5
July reported that U.S. military personnel to support UN operations in
Bosnia have begun arriving in Split. The International Herald Tribune
wrote on 1 July, however, that the proposed Rapid Reaction Force may be
little more than a cover for the withdrawal of all UN forces. One UN
official said that "if we don't have the Serbs' strategic consent, we
don't try" to open land corridors. The article notes that UN special
envoy Yasushi Akashi is reluctant to do anything that "might anger the
Bosnian Serbs," but AFP on 3 July suggests that the Serbs are not
reciprocating. Their vice president told a Greek daily that "we have
shown much patience [toward peacekeepers] whom we consider the
aggressors. We will bother them again if necessary without hesitating."
-- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

SERBS FIRE ON PEACEKEEPERS FOR THIRD DAY. Bosnian Serb forces on 4 July
again shelled French peacekeepers using the precarious Mt. Igman supply
route into Sarajevo. The BBC added that the French returned the fire.
RFE/RL noted that the food situation in the besieged capital is
critical, and Vjesnik writes that "Sarajevo is without food." Meanwhile,
Bosnian Croat authorities confirmed that they will not allow British and
French contingents slated for the new UN force to pass until its mission
is clarified. -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

MILOSEVIC RUNS SERBIAN WAR MACHINE. The International Herald Tribune on
4 July argued that Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic is not only no
peacemaker but has actually tightened his grip on Serbian forces
throughout Croatia and Bosnia. His claim to have cut off supplies to
Bosnian Serbs is "a sham" since the goods are delivered via Krajina.
Milosevic has shipped draft-age refugees back from Serbia to Bosnia and
Krajina and denied draft-age young men from those areas access to
Serbia. Pay records found by the Croats in western Slavonia two months
ago show that Belgrade paid the salaries of at least 300 officers there,
and the new Krajina commander appointed later in May was sent from
Belgrade on Milosevic's orders. Moreover, the method the Serbs used in
downing a U.S. F-16 on 2 June showed that all Serbian air defense
systems are increasingly integrated. -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

CROATIA CLAIMS IT WILL NOT LAUNCH NEW ATTACKS. Prime Minister Nikica
Valentic said Operation Blitz on 1-2 May was a limited action and that
the Croatian army will launch no fresh strikes against the Serbs,
although it could easily do so. He tried to reassure the economically
vital tourist industry that visitors need not fear being caught in a war
zone, adding that he and his family will spend their vacation in
Dubrovnik, Novi list reported on 1 July. Some opposition parties earlier
demanded that the minister for tourism be sacked for saying that this
year's picture is rosy. -- Patrick Moore, OMRI, Inc.

SERBIAN COURT REDUCES GENERAL'S SENTENCE. Nasa Borba on 4 July reported
that the rump Yugoslavia's highest military court has reduced Maj. Gen.
Vlado Trifunovic's jail term. Trifunovic was first sentenced in 1992 for
allegedly undermining national security by surrendering weapons and
refusing to fight Croatian forces during the war between Croatia and the
Belgrade-backed Croatian Serbs. Trifunovic's original 11-year sentence
was cut to seven years. Two of four fellow officers who appeared with
Trifunovic in court also had their sentences reduced. -- Stan Markotich,
OMRI, Inc.

KOSOVAR ACTIVIST DIES AFTER POLICE TORTURE. Shefki Latifi, a human
rights activist from Kosovo, has died after being tortured by police,
AFP reported on 4 July. According to the Kosovar Helsinki Committee for
Human Rights, Latifi was arrested in Podujevo on 4 July and "brutally
beaten" at a police station. He died a few hours later at his home.
Latifi is reported to be the 10th victim of Serbian police violence
since the beginning of this year. Police harassment of ethnic Albanians
in Podujevo has increased since the ethnic Albanian police officer
Bejtush Beka was killed there in June. The circumstances of Beka's
killing remain unclear. Freelance journalist Ramadan Mucolli claims he
was arrested and tortured by police because of his report for Albanian
Television about the Beka's death. -- Fabian Schmidt, OMRI, Inc.

ROMANIAN PARLIAMENTARY COMMISSION INVESTIGATES TRAILING OF JOURNALISTS.
The parliamentary commission supervising the Romanian Intelligence
Service is investigating the case of journalists who reported President
Ion Iliescu's alleged past links with the KGB and were subsequently
shadowed by RIS agents (see OMRI Daily Digest, 26 and 27 June 1995).
Romanian Television reported on 3 July that the commission has
questioned RIS director Virgil Magureanu, who argued again that the two
journalists were never "intentionally trailed." In a related
development, Evenimentul zilei reported on 5 July that Tana Ardeleanu,
the journalist who first alleged the KGB links and who was shadowed by
the RIS, was prevented by border guards from leaving the country because
of a penal case in which she is involved. The daily commented that it
was strange she would attempt to leave Romania right now, since her
deposition to the parliamentary commission is of utmost importance in
clarifying the shadowing case. -- Michael Shafir, OMRI, Inc.

ROMANIAN DEFENSE MINISTER ON "LETTER OF THE 300." National Defense
Minister Gheorghe Tinca told a press conference carried by Radio
Bucharest on 3 July that the letter from 300 active and reserve military
addressed to Iliescu and published by the extreme nationalist weekly
Romania mare (see OMRI Daily Digest, 21 and 26 June 1995) was "totally
unjustified" and "offensive." He said the letter did not reflect "the
true spirit" of the Romanian army, where the ongoing reform of the armed
forces was "properly understood." According to Evenimentul zilei on 4
July, Tinca revealed that the army's counter-espionage department has
established that no active duty officer signed the letter, contrary to a
claim by those who published it. -- Michael Shafir, OMRI, Inc.

PDSR REJECTS "BLACKMAIL" BY EXTREMIST ALLIES. Adrian Nastase, executive
chairman of the Party of Social Democracy in Romania (PDSR, the main
coalition party), has said his party will not "give in to blackmail" by
the Party of Romanian National Unity (PUNR) and the Greater Romania
Party (PRM), Radio Bucharest reported on 4 July. Nastase said that if
necessary, the PDSR could rule as a minority government. Reuters
reported that Nastase said early elections were also a possibility. The
statement comes in the wake of criticism by the PUNR and the PRM of the
education law passed by the parliament, the parleys with Hungary on the
pending bilateral treaty, the PUNR's demand that it be given the foreign
affairs portfolio (see OMRI Daily Digest, 3 July 1995), and the "letter
of the 300." According to Reuters, Nastase said that the PDSR will not
allow coalition partners to interfere in foreign affairs, adding that
the Foreign Ministry is above party politics and serves only national
interests. -- Michael Shafir, OMRI, Inc.

MOLDOVAN RULING PARTY REJECTS SNEGUR ACCUSATIONS. The Executive
Committee of the Agrarian Democratic Party of Moldova (PDAM) has
rejected accusations made by President Mircea Snegur after his
resignation from the party (see OMRI Daily Digest, 27 June 1995). In a
statement carried by Infotag on 3 July, the PDAM said Snegur had
presented a distorted image of the party, accusing it of anti-national
policies. It argued that the party is the main advocate of reform in the
country and has never claimed, as Snegur implied, that the future of
Moldova is tied solely to that of the CIS countries. With regard to
Snegur's initiative to re-designate the country's official language as
Romanian, the party noted that in the past, he has said that the
"designation of our language originates in the name of our country."
Meanwhile, Infotag on 3 July quoted Prime Minister Andrei Sangheli as
saying he supports the idea of conducting a referendum on the official
designation of the country's main language. He said that amending the
constitution to reflect this change--as suggested by Snegur's
initiative--would "ruin Moldova as an independent state." -- Michael
Shafir, OMRI, Inc.

TURKISH PRESIDENT IN BULGARIA. Suleyman Demirel arrived in Bulgaria on 4
July for an official three-day state visit, accompanied by a large
contingent of business leaders and state officials, international media
reported. He stressed that relations between Turkey and Bulgaria,
strained severely after Sofia's efforts in the 1980s to forcibly
Bulgarize its estimated 800,000-strong Turkish minority, were now
cordial and improving. Demirel discussed, among other things, regional
security issues and bilateral relations with Bulgarian President Zhelyu
Zhelev. "Turkey will back Bulgaria's candidacy for [membership] in
NATO," Demirel was quoted as saying by BTA. The Turkish leader is also
slated to meet with Bulgarian Premier Zhan Videnov and to address the
Bulgarian parliament. -- Stan Markotich and Lowell Bezanis, OMRI, Inc.

ALBANIAN APPEALS COURT UPHOLDS ILIR HOXHA'S SENTENCE. The Albanian
Appeals Court on 3 July upheld a one-year prison sentence handed down to
Ilir Hoxha, Reuters reported. Hoxha, son of communist dictator Enver
Hoxha, was sentenced on 8 June after being found guilty of "inciting
national hatred by endangering public peace" and calling for vengeance
and hatred against parts of the population" in an interview with Modeste
in April (see OMRI Daily Digest, 9 June 1995). -- Fabian Schmidt, OMRI,
Inc.

GREEK DEFENSE MINISTER IN ALBANIA. Gerassimos Arsenis, visiting Tirana
from 3-4 July, met with his counterpart, Safet Zhulali, President Sali
Berisha, and Prime Minister Aleksander Meksi, AFP reported. They
discussed further military and political cooperation and signed a
cooperation program on closer military contacts, including joint
military exercises and support for Albania's military health service and
arms industry. Arsenis said the talks had put an end to a difficult,
tense year over the status of ethnic Greeks in Albania and Albanian
immigrants working in Greece. He added that Greece was willing to help
Albania seek integration into EU structures. -- Fabian Schmidt, OMRI,
Inc.

[As of 12:00 CET]

Compiled by Jan Cleave

The OMRI Daily Digest offers the latest news from the former Soviet
Union and East-Central and Southeastern Europe. It is published Monday
through Friday by the Open Media Research Institute. The OMRI Daily
Digest is distributed electronically via the OMRI-L list. To subscribe,
send "SUBSCRIBE OMRI-L YourFirstName YourLastName" (without the
quotation marks and inserting your name where shown) to
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No subject line or other text should be included.
To receive the OMRI Daily Digest by mail or fax, please direct inquiries
to OMRI Publications, Na Strzi 63, 140 62 Prague 4, Czech Republic; or
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Tel.: (42-2) 6114 2114; fax: (42-2) 426 396

OMRI also publishes the biweekly journal Transition, which contains
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Transition subscription information send an e-mail to TRANSITION@OMRI.CZ

            Copyright (C) 1995 Open Media Research Institute, Inc.
                             All rights reserved.


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