If you're sure you understand everthing that is going on, you're hopelessly confused. - Walter Mondale
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 226, 1 December 1994

                             RUSSIA

STATE OF EMERGENCY IN CHECHNYA? More than two hours after the
expiration of the 1 December deadline set in Russian President
Boris Yeltsin's ultimatum to both sides in the conflict in
Chechnya, presidential spokesmen told an RL correspondent that
Yeltsin had still not signed a decree imposing a state of
emergency in the north Caucasian republic. Under the Russian
Constitution, such a decree would have to be approved by the
Federation Council within 72 hours in order to go into effect; if
the council were not to meet within 72 hours, the state of
emergency would go into effect automatically. The next session of
the Federation Council is scheduled for 6 December. On the
morning of 1 December a delegation of Russian parliamentary
deputies set out for Grozny, the Chechen capital, to try to
secure the release of Russian prisoners captured in Chechnya.
According to reports from the north Caucasus, increasing numbers
of Russian troops are being deployed on the Chechen border. --
Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA MAY DROP PARTNERSHIP FOR PEACE IF NATO EXPANDS. Foreign
Minister Andrei Kozyrev told Interfax on 30 November that "Russia
may give up [its participation in] NATO's Partnership for Peace
program if that bloc is enlarged," and that he "might forego
submitting Russia's presentation document" [on its cooperation
with NATO under the partnership] if the impending NATO council
meeting adopts "a bloc enlargement calendar." The Partnership for
Peace is a series of bilateral programs between NATO and any CSCE
member wishing to participate. Russia--which joined the
Partnership for Peace on 22 June 1994--planned to present its
implementation proposal in Brussels on 2 December. Kozyrev said
that "hasty expansion of NATO and scheduling this process will
create a new situation. This will be an obvious departure from
the partnership we agreed on." In previous remarks on the
subject, cited by Interfax on 24 November, Kozyrev chastised
"NATO-mania in both Western and Central Europe." Deputy Foreign
Minister Sergei Krylov, for his part, insisted to AFP on 29
November that the potential of the Partnership for Peace should
be fully explored before enlarging NATO; and he appeared to link
any enlargement to the admission of Russia itself. -- Doug Clarke
and Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN SIGNS DECREE SETTING UP OSTANKINO PUBLIC TV. On 30
November Yeltsin decreed the establishment of Russian Public
Television Ostankino (RPT) on the basis of the former state
Ostankino Radio and Television Company, ITAR-TASS and Interfax
reported. As outlined in the Daily Report of 30 November, the
decree provides for the privatization of 49 percent of Ostankino
shares, to be sold to 12 large companies, including a number of
private banks, the ITAR-TASS news agency, the AVTOVAZ car plant,
and the TV Center. Fifty-one percent of the shares will continue
to belong to the State Committee on Property. Nevertheless, the
RPT will no longer be financed from the state purse. All the
state funds will be channeled into the financing of another
state-owned TV company, Russian Television, and the educational
Russian Universities channel. The RPT Ostankino will be run by a
council chaired by Aleksandr Yakovlev (currently the chairman of
the Federal Television Service). Ostankino TV newscasts claimed
that the reorganization would help the company to provide
unbiased coverage of the forthcoming election campaign. -- Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW TURN IN CONTROVERSIAL CASE OF DETAINED EDITOR. On 29 November
Ostankino TV and Interfax reported on a news conference held in
the Russian PEN center concerning the case of Aleksei Kostin, the
publisher of the newspaper Eshche (More), who was arrested
following Yeltsin's showdown with the parliament in October 1993
because of the alleged pornographic character of the paper. The
Moscow Nikulino district court has returned Kostin's case for
additional investigation, Kostin's lawyer Yulii Vronsky told
reporters, but Moscow Prosecutor Gennadii Ponomarev has appealed
to a higher court to turn Kostin's case over to another judge.
Kostin's case is a bewildering one. First, although Eshche was a
proreform newspaper, he appears to be the only person still in
prison as a result of the events of October 1993; Yeltsin's
hard-line opponents were released as early as February 1994.
Second, Eshche was officially registered at the Press Ministry
and had never been warned that its contents were considered
undesirable. The publishers of many far more obscene newspapers,
which have never been registered and are circulated illegally in
large numbers in Moscow and elsewhere, have not even been fined.
Third, the case against Kostin was initiated by former acting
Press Minister Vladimir Shumeiko; the current holder of this
position, Sergei Gryzunov, has recently intervened in Kostin's
behalf, but his statements have been ignored by the prosecution.
-- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

BOLSHOI GOES ON STRIKE. Bolshoi Theater dancers, singers, and
musicians threatened on 30 November to stage a strike for the
first time in the theater's 218-year-old history, Interfax and
Western news agencies reported. The performers are trying to
block the implementation of Yeltsin's decree of September 1994
introducing a contract system for hiring artists and setting up a
15-member board to run the theater. They are also demanding that
the theater's director, Vladimir Kokoshin, be dismissed and that
the Bolshoi ballet master, Yurii Grigorovich, continue to work
with the company. Unless their demands are met, they will delay
by 20 minutes the beginning of the ballet Giselle on 8 December
and take further strike action afterward. Yeltsin's decree was
prompted by the theater's financial problems and by many decades
of conflicts between Grigorovich and dozens of the Bolshoi's
ballet stars, including Maya Plisetskaya, Ekaterina Maksimova,
and Vladimir Vasiliev. Dancers emigrating from the USSR as early
as the 1970s cited Grigorovich's authoritarian rule as their main
reason for defecting. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

LEND-LEASE STEAM ENGINES SAVE RUSSIAN AIRCRAFT PLANT. The
Progress Aerospace Company in Arsenev--100 kilometers northwest
of Vladivostok--is using lend-lease American steam engines
provided to the Soviet Union during World War II to replace the
power and heat shut off by local authorities. Company officials
told Interfax on 30 November that the company owed the city power
authorities more than 8 billion rubles but could not pay, because
its customers were not paying for the Ka-50 and Mi-34 helicopters
and An-74 aircraft the company builds. When the city began to cut
the company's power, Progress rented two of the old steam engines
and is now generating its own. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

DEFENSE WORKERS RESUME HUNGER STRIKE. Workers at the
Spetstekhnika joint-stock company in Ekaterinburg (a component of
Uralmash), on 30 November resumed a hunger strike suspended in
October, according to an Interfax report. The workers had
suspended their strike when the company and regional
administration agreed to pay the back wages from April to
November, to reorganize the company, and to turn it into a
state-owned company. The unpaid wages amounted to 2.5 million
rubles. The report said that some wages had been paid to the
workers of the striking shop, but the other demands had not been
met. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

CAUTION ON CUSTOMS UNION. At a meeting in Moscow on 29 November,
the Council of Foreign Trade Ministers of CIS member states
approved in principle a program for creating a CIS-wide free
trade zone and agreed on procedures for the removal of existing
constraints on mutual trade--a goal shared by all states,
particularly those eyeing the Russian market. With regard to the
Russian proposals for a customs union, however, the meeting
referred the draft documents back to the experts for further work
and resolved that the formation of such a union should come at a
"subsequent stage" in the development of the CIS Economic Union.
The meeting also resolved that the eventual formation of a common
tariff area should entail "the retention of national customs
controls on the states' borders." The meeting's decisions appear
to reflect the reservations of most CIS member states about the
prospective loss of their national prerogatives as implied in the
Russian proposals on the customs union. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL, Inc.

RENEWED HOSTILITIES FEARED IN MOLDOVA. Contrary to the 1992
armistice convention, Russia's Defense Ministry has in recent
days begun implementing a plan to unilaterally reduce its
disengagement force in eastern Moldova from the remaining four
battalions to only two; there had originally been six. The four
battalions at present in the area are being replaced by two fresh
ones from the Totsk-based 27th motor rifle division, earmarked
for "peacekeeping" operations in the CIS. Transdniester units,
unlawfully allowed inside the disengagement zone by the Russian
contingent, are poised to take over some key positions vacated by
the Russian side. The latter argues that it can no longer afford
to finance its contingent and that the situation on the Dniester
has sufficiently stabilized. But Moscow continues to invoke
potential "instability" in proposals under which the peacekeeping
mandate would be transferred to its 14th Army--a step that
Chisinau has resisted all along. In statements mostly off the
record in recent days, senior Moldovan officials have expressed
concern that the sharp reduction in the Russian peacekeeping
contingent could set the stage for "provocations" by the superior
Transdniester forces in order to force Moldova to request the
14th Army's intervention in a peacekeeping role and thus nullify
the withdrawal agreement (signed but not approved by Russia and
not yet in force). Moldova's leadership fears a "Georgian
scenario" along these lines. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

SPACE COMPANY TO INVEST IN BAIKONUR. The Russian Khrunichev State
Space Research and Scientific-Production Center plans to invest
at least $25 million in modernizing the Baikonur Cosmodrome in
Kazakhstan, according to Anatolii Kiselev, its general director.
He told Interfax on 30 November that Khrunichev wanted to upgrade
the Baikonur facilities used to launch the company's heavy
reusable Proton and Proton-M boosters in view of the upcoming
launch of western commercial satellites. Khrunichev is part of a
joint Russian-American consortium that has concluded 13 deals
worth $1 billion to use the Proton boosters. The first
launch--scheduled for November 1995--is of an Inmarsat satellite.
-- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

                   CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN SERB LEADER SNUBS BOUTROS GHALI. RFE/RL's South Slavic
Service reported from Sarajevo on 30 November that UN
Secretary-General Boutros Boutros Ghali held talks with Bosnian
President Alija Izetbegovic. Few details were forthcoming, except
that the men discussed a cease-fire and possibilities for ending
the Bosnian conflict. The top UN official did not offer any new
plans. He said the talks were "long and positive" and that the
two men's views were close, but Izetbegovic noted "great
differences" in their standpoints. The Bosnian leader pointed out
that all UN resolutions on that embattled republic are still in
force, as are the "Contact Group's" peace plan for Bosnia and the
UN plan for Bihac. He hoped the Serbs would be brought around to
accepting them. Outside the building in which the meeting took
place, demonstrators booed Boutros-Ghali. The secretary-general
had been slated to meet Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic at
the UNPROFOR-controlled Sarajevo airport, but Karadzic insisted
that the session take place at Serbian headquarters in Pale in an
effort to secure de facto UN acknowledgment of his separate
state. Boutros Ghali refused to comply and left Bosnia
"disappointed" by Karadzic's stance. -- Patrick Moore

CROATIA TO INTERVENE IN BIHAC? The New York Times on 30 November
quoted Defense Minister Gojko Susak as saying Croatia will have
no choice but to intervene if Bihac falls to Serbian forces. He
noted that between 3,000 and 5,000 Croatian Serb forces are
participating in the attack. If Bihac were to fall, the Serbs
would secure the rail line connecting Croatian Serb headquarters
at Knin with the major Bosnian Serb center at Banja Luka. Zagreb
is alarmed by such a possibility. Both France and the United
States have meanwhile warned Croatia not to intervene, arguing it
could lead to "an expansion of the conflict," RFE/RL's South
Slavic Service cited French sources as saying. International news
agencies quoted the State Department as warning of "additional
casualties and unforeseeable consequences." Elsewhere, Politika
on 1 December publishes the full text of what it says is the
agreement between Zagreb and Knin on restoring infrastructure
links. Since the Knin Serbs joined in the attack on Bihac,
however, any such agreement is bound to be in limbo, if not a
dead letter altogether. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

SEVEN UKRAINIANS HELD BY SERBS NEAR BIHAC. Seven Ukrainians
serving in the UN peacekeeping force were captured by Bosnian
Serbs at Checkpoint 11 near Bihac on 30 November, ITAR-TASS
reported. UN representatives have established contact with the
Bosnian Serbs who captured the Ukrainians and are negotiating
with them. Just days ago, Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma said
that Ukraine may withdraw its troops if their security cannot be
guaranteed. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

KOSOVAR ACTIVIST DIES IN SERBIAN PRISON. According to leading
Kosovar human rights and political organizations, the 39-year-old
Ismajl Reka "died as the result of a two-day torture" at the
Kacanik prison, international news agencies reported from
Pristina on 30 November. The authorities issued no statement but
told Reka's family that he had committed suicide by jumping out
of a fifth-floor window. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

MORE ALBANIAN POLICEMEN ARRESTED IN KOSOVO. The number of ethnic
Albanian former policemen arrested by the Serbian police to date
has risen to at least 80, Deutsche Welle reported on 30 November.
Those arrested are members of the Independent Trade Unions of
Kosovo. Serbian police have accused them of building up an
illegal military formation. Borba on 1 December reports that a
group of 12 Kosovar lawyers has appealed to the Council of
Europe, the CSCE, the European Parliament, and a number of human
rights organizations to take up the case of the arrested
policemen. -- Fabian Schmidt, RFE/RL, Inc.

CENTRAL EUROPEANS INVITED TO EU MEETING. The European Union has
invited six Central European countries to a two-hour meeting on
10 December in Essen, after its formal summit talks. The
announcement was made on 30 November by German Chancellor Helmut
Kohl, who said at a press conference that the union "decided to
invite the [Central European] state and government heads simply
to send the message that we are not running a 'closed-shop' in
the European Union." Gazeta Wyborcza reported on 1 December that
Polish Foreign Minister Andrzej Olechowski described the
forthcoming meeting as "symbolic, because it would be difficult
for 21 premiers to talk about serious matters during a two-hour
lunch." But he added that the invitation was important because
the summit would discuss the future inclusion of Central European
countries in the EU. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH DEFENSE PORTFOLIO STILL VACANT. Prime Minister Waldemar
Pawlak on 30 November withdrew the candidacy of emigre politician
Ryszard Kaczorowski for the defense portfolio in the face of
opposition from members of the government coalition and President
Lech Walesa. The president is still proposing the appointment of
the former government functionary Zbigniew Okonski, but his
candidacy is opposed by the Alliance of the Democratic Left, a
senior partner in the coalition. According to both Gazeta
Wyborcza and Rzeczpospolita on 1 December, Pawlak could refrain
from appointing a new minister and simply designate one of the
current deputy ministers as acting head of the ministry. Both
newspapers also speculate that the current confusion over the
selection of a new minister may have been orchestrated by Pawlak,
who may want to persuade Walesa to support the government's
economic program in exchange for premier's acceptance of the
president's candidate for the ministerial post. -- Jan de
Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

DINNER WITH PREMIER CAUSES STIR IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC. More than
100 Czech businessmen accepted an invitation by Vaclav Klaus's
Civic Democratic Party to dine with the premier on 30 November in
exchange for a financial contribution to the CDP ranging from
100,000 koruny ($3,500) koruny to 250,000 koruny ($8,600). The
invitation cards said that each contribution "is a gift for the
sake of prosperity and democracy, spearheaded in our country by
the CDP." The dinner was sharply criticized by some political
parties. The Democratic Union sent an open letter to President
Vaclav Havel, published in Cesky Denik on 30 November, asking him
to take a public stand on the affair. It argued that Klaus's
"sale of privileges connected with his state office . . . , with
the aim of enriching the CDP's coffers, is a provocation."
Havel's office announced on 30 November that the president will
refrain from comment for the time being. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL,
Inc.

BAVARIA GIVES GREEN LIGHT TO CZECH PIPELINE. The government of
the German state of Bavaria has officially approved the
construction of a pipeline from the German town of Ingolstadt to
Kralupy in the Czech Republic. The Czech government has lobbied
heavily for the construction of the pipeline as an alternative to
pipelines from the former Soviet Union, on which the Czech
Republic currently depends. CTK reports that the Bavarian
Ministry of Labor, which was responsible for evaluating the
project, gave the final approval on 30 November after 17 months
of deliberations. The project has been opposed by German
environmentalists and owners of property that the pipeline will
cross. In a press release issued on 30 November, Bavarian Labor
Minister Barbara Stamm argued that if supplies from Russia were
to decrease, oil would have to be delivered to the Czech Republic
by trucks from the West, which would harm the environment much
more than the pipeline. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT REJECTS LOAN TO SLOVAKIA. The European
Parliament's Committee for External Economic Relations has failed
to approve a $246 million loan to Slovakia, which the country had
requested to boost its hard currency reserves. Slovak Deputy
Prime Minister Brigita Schmoegnerova told journalists in
Bratislava on 30 November that the loan had been approved by the
European Union and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and
Development, "and we considered the approval by the European
Parliament to be a mere formality." She said the committee views
the situation in Slovakia "as unclear and confusing." The
committee concluded it was unclear how economic reform in
Slovakia would proceed. Schmoegnerova noted that if Slovakia did
not receive the loan, "the country's hard currency reserves may
be threatened." She pointed out that the situation could become
even more complicated if Slovakia began trading with the Czech
Republic in hard currency. The two countries currently use a
clearing system in bilateral trade. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

STRONG RIGHT-OF-CENTER PARTY IN SLOVAKIA? Two leaders of the
National Democratic Party told journalists in Bratislava on 30
November that several right-of-center political parties in
Slovakia are discussing a possible merger. The parties in
question are the Democratic Union of outgoing Prime Minister
Jozef Moravcik, the Party of Entrepreneurs, and possibly the
Democratic Party. The NDP ran on the DU's ticket in the fall
elections, in which right-of-center civic parties did not fare
well, owing partly to their inability to unite. The two NDP
leaders noted that the merger could help establish a strong
right-of-center party, which, together with the Christian
Democratic Party, could "more effectively challenge extreme
forces of the collectivist type." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN OPPOSITION PARTY CRITICIZES PREMIER. The Presidium of
the Alliance of Young Democrats on 30 November criticized Prime
Minister Gyula Horn for his statement on NATO during his visit to
Warsaw in November, MTI reports. Horn had said that Hungary
supported an "intensive dialogue with Moscow in order to
dissipate misunderstandings and fears" among the Russian
leadership. The AYD Presidium argued that this statement
questioned Hungary's commitment to NATO--the only international
security organization capable of guaranteeing Hungary's security
and Western orientation. The Presidium called on Horn to make
clear at the upcoming CSCE summit in Budapest that Hungary is a
sovereign state and would like to be a full member of NATO as
soon as possible. -- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

LONDON PROTESTS BRITISH COUPLE'S TREATMENT IN ROMANIA. Reuters on
30 November reports that Britain has lodged a protest with the
Romanian government over the alleged ill-treatment of a British
couple convicted of trying to smuggle a baby out of Romania in
early July. Adrian and Bernadette Mooney were initially sentenced
to 28 months in jail, but the sentence was overturned on appeal
in mid-November. After returning to Britain, the two complained
of inhumane treatment during their imprisonment in a Bucharest
police station and harassment after they were let out on bail. A
Foreign Office spokesman said a formal note of protest was handed
to the Romanian Foreign Ministry on 29 November and Romania's
ambassador to London summoned to the Foreign Office for an
explanation. Radio Bucharest quoted Bucharest's ambassador in
London, Sergiu Celac, as describing the British intervention as
"a request to clarify" the affair rather than a protest. -- Dan
Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALBANIA CUTS SENTENCES OF SOME FORMER LEADING COMMUNISTS. The
Albanian Supreme Court reduced sentences for some key imprisoned
ex-communist leaders, Reuters reported on 30 November. Former
President Ramiz Alia's prison term was cut from nine to six
years, while those of ex-Vice President Rita Marko and former
Interior Minister Simon Stefani were reduced by two years. The
moves appear to be in conjunction with an amnesty to mark
Albania's national day, but it is still unclear if the amnesty
will be applied to Enver Hoxha's widow, Nexhmije. -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

IMMINENT CHANGES IN THE ALBANIAN GOVERNMENT? Albanian Prime
Minister Aleksander Meksi plans a major reshuffle of his
government by the end of the year, Gazeta Shqiptare reported on
27 and 28 November. In the biggest change in Meksi's government
since it took office in summer 1992, seven new ministers are to
be appointed. The daily said the reshuffle is in response to
criticism of the government, which failed to muster support in a
November referendum for a new constitution. Meanwhile, the
government has endorsed the draft of an anti-corruption law that
might force civil servants and state officials to declare their
assets. -- Fabian Schmidt, RFE/RL, Inc.

MARCHUK WARNS UKRAINIAN NATIONALISTS ON CHECHNYA. First Ukrainian
Deputy Prime Minister Evhen Marchuk has said Ukraine will take
all necessary steps to prevent Ukrainian citizens from taking
part in the conflict in Chechnya, Interfax reported on 30
November. The statement was made in connection with a 29 November
report that a plane load of ultranationalists from the
paramilitary Ukrainian National Self-Defense Organization had
been detained in Russia on their way to Chechnya. UNSO, whose
members have taken part in the Abkhaz conflict against Russia, is
sympathetic toward Chechen national aspirations. Marchuk said
there has been no official confirmation yet of the detention of
the Chechnya-bound UNSO group. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINE ADMITS TO SIPHONING RUSSIAN GAS. Reuters on 30 November
reported that a Ukrainian official from the gas distributor
Ukrhazprom confirmed that Ukraine is indeed siphoning Russian gas
from pipelines. Bohdan Baby from Ukrhazprom said that even though
Russia would undoubtedly fine Ukraine heavily for the siphoning,
Ukraine's steel and energy industries could not be allowed to
grind to a halt. Gazprom halved Ukraine's gas supplies on 27
November because Ukrainian officials had failed to renew
contracts in time. Negotiations on the contracts are continuing,
and Gazprom official Vladimir Podelyakin said Ukraine has agreed
to pay in advance for the shipment of 4 billion cubic meters of
gas for December. Gazprom transports some 500 million cubic
meters of gas daily through Ukraine; half is meant for Ukraine
and the rest for other countries. Ukraine has been having
difficulty making regular payments for the supplies and owes
Gazprom a total of $1.4 billion. Its latest siphoning has
affected supplies to Germany and Slovakia. -- Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUSIAN PRIME MINISTER SAYS PRICES MUST BE FREED. Mikhail
Chyrhir told a press conference that the suspension of the
November decree liberalizing prices must be lifted,
Belinform-TASS reported on 29 November. Chyhir said the continued
regulation of prices in Belarus makes Belarusian products much
cheaper than those of its Baltic neighbors, Russia, or Ukraine.
As a result, basic commodities are bought up in Belarus and
transported to its neighbors. Chyhir said the Cabinet of
Ministers has asked President Alyaksandr Lukashenka to allow
prices to be increased so that the country would not face
shortages owing to the mass exodus of its goods abroad. -- Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

NATO ACCEPTS LITHUANIA'S PFP PROGRAM. NATO Secretary-General
Willy Claes approved Lithuania's individual Partnership for Peace
program in Brussels on 30 November. Foreign Ministry Secretary
Albinas Januska told RFE/RL's Lithuanian Service that although 24
countries have signed up for the PFP program, Lithuania is only
the ninth to have its individual program approved. The other
eight are Sweden, Finland, Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic,
Slovakia, Romania, and Bulgaria. Januska suggested at a NATO
hearing that an "associate status" be given to candidate
countries not considered ready for full membership and a "special
strategic relationship" to countries that did not desire to
become full NATO members. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

LITHUANIAN PRESIDENT IN ITALY. Algirdas Brazauskas, accompanied
by Foreign Minister Povilas Gylys, several parliament deputies,
and a group of businessmen, arrived in Rome on 30 November for a
three-day visit, Radio Lithuania reports. He had an hour-long
meeting with his Italian counterpart, Luigi Scalfaro, and shorter
meetings with Senate Chairman Carlo Scognamiglio, Chamber of
Deputies Chairperson Irene Pivetti, and Italian businessmen.
Scalfaro said he would tell the Foreign Ministry to pay more
attention to Lithuania's request to regain its embassy in Rome,
which was seized by the USSR after World War II and is still used
by Moscow. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

CLINTON SEEKS LATVIAN PRESIDENT'S VIEWS ON CSCE. Latvian media
reported on 30 November that in a letter to President Guntis
Ulmanis, the US president expressed his ideas about the future
development of the CSCE and asked Ulmanis for his views. Clinton
said he does not envisage a Europe divided into spheres of
influence, and he made specific proposals regarding European
security and stability. The letter was written in anticipation of
the CSCE conference on 5 and 6 December in Budapest, where
Clinton said he would like to meet with Ulmanis. -- Dzintra
Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

ESTONIAN, FINNISH, RUSSIAN BORDER COOPERATION. Acting on a
Finnish initiative, the national border guard chiefs of Estonia,
Finland, and Russia signed a trilateral cooperation protocol in
Helsinki on 29 November. The protocol regulates the activities in
1995 of the coast guards of Estonia, Finland, and Russia in the
Gulf of Finland. It also calls for joint efforts to prevent
illegal activities in the area and to promote smoother border
crossings. The Estonian representative also signed bilateral
protocols with Finland and Russia, including a protocol with the
latter on the exchange of information and on cooperation in
tracking down criminals. BNS on 30 November quoted Estonian
Captain Tarmo Kouts as saying: "We have agreed with the Russian
border guard leaders to discuss only the technical guarding of
the borders, without touching on aspects that have to be settled
by the two countries' politicians through negotiations." --
Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Jan Cleave and Penny Morvant)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
Inquiries about specific news items should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
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Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912
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Internet: REEDB@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


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