I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up, live out the true meaning of its creed: we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal. - Rev. Martin Luther King 1929-1968
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 225, 30 November 1994

                              RUSSIA

SITUATION IN CHECHNYA. President Boris Yeltsin announced on 29
November that Russia would intervene in the conflict in Chechnya
if the factions fighting in the republic did not lay down their
arms within 48 hours, Western and Russian sources reported. A
session of the Russian Security Council later in the day discussed
the situation in the north Caucasian republic, but there was no
immediate report of what steps the Russians proposed to take.
Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudaev was reported to have rejected
Yeltsin's ultimatum, but a spokesman for the opposition
Provisional Council said that its forces had suspended their
attack on Grozny, the Chechen capital, in response to the warning.
Unidentified aircraft attacked the presidential palace and airport
in Grozny while Dudaev was talking to correspondents; Russian
officials later denied that the planes belonged to the Russian
military. Many residents of Grozny were reported to have fled the
city, while thousands of supporters of Dudaev rallied in the
central square. Planes were reported to have flown low over Grozny
during the night of 29-30 November, but thick fog apparently
prevented further air attacks. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

GORBACHEV CALLS FOR NEGOTIATIONS WITH DUDAEV. The former USSR
president has appealed to Yeltsin and the Russian parliament to
begin talks with the Chechen president on a peaceful settlement of
the crisis, an RFE/RL correspondent reported on 29 November. At a
news conference occasioned by the publication of his new book, The
USSR Could Have Been Preserved, Gorbachev argued that it was
impossible to solve the Chechen problem by military means and that
an attempt to break the Chechen resistance by force could lead to
a full-fledged war in the Caucasus. In Gorbachev's opinion,
Yeltsin is primarily responsible for the problem because of his
encouragement of separatism during his power struggle with the
Soviet central government in 1987-91. Gorbachev contended that the
USSR should have been replaced by a more flexible, decentralized
structure and warned against attempts to build a new "Russian
Empire." He also said he failed to understand Moscow's policies:
it rejected the use of force in Bosnia in favor of diplomacy, but
was using air power and artillery on its own territory. -- Victor
Yasmann and Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN, YAKOVLEV DISCUSS FUTURE OF OSTANKINO. On 29 November
Yeltsin discussed with Aleksandr Yakovlev, the chairman of the
Ostankino Radio and TV Company, the fate of Russia's largest
broadcasting enterprise. The meeting followed a statement by
Yeltsin on 18 November outlining his plan to merge Ostankino with
the other state-controlled channel, Russian Television (RTV). That
proposal was unanimously condemned by media figures, including
Yakovlev and RTV Chairman Oleg Poptsov. Following his meeting with
the president, Yakovlev told ITAR-TASS that he expected the
president to agree to his idea of privatizing Ostankino. Under
Yakovlev's plan, the state would retain a majority of shares in
Ostankino, while the remaining 49 percent would be sold to 12
large companies, such as the banks Menatep, Stolichnyi, Inkombank,
and Roskredit. Yakovlev noted that this would release the state
from the burden of maintaining the company at the tax payers'
expense. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

LUZHKOV ANGERED BY REPORT ON HIS ELECTION PLANS. A report in
Rossiiskaya gazeta of 19 November claiming that Moscow Mayor Yurii
Luzhkov and Yabloko leader Grigorii Yavlinsky would challenge
Yeltsin and Viktor Chernomyrdin in the next elections prompted an
angry reaction from the leading Russian newspapers referred to in
the article. (Rossiiskaya gazeta had claimed that a number of
national media chiefs, backed by the financial group "Most," had
set up a fund to promote Luzhkov's presidential candidacy.)
Moskovskie novosti, Segodnya, Nezavisimaya gazeta, and Rossiiskie
vesti, from 23 to 26 November, all attacked the report as a
"provocation" and charged that it manipulated data published
earlier by Russian and US newspapers. Luzhkov, meanwhile, convoked
a special session of his administration to review the allegations
and instructed his lawyers to sue Rossiiskaya gazeta and to ask
the Federal Counterintelligence Service to launch an
investigation. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

STEPASHIN CONCERNED ABOUT INCREASING ESPIONAGE IN RUSSIA. Director
of the Federal Counterintelligence Service (FSK) Sergei Stepashin
told Komsomolskaya pravda on 29 November that his service had
arrested more spies this year than in the last five years put
together. Although Stepashin gave no names, he made it clear that
most of those taken into custody belonged to Western secret
services. He added that an understanding had been reached with the
Western intelligence community not to turn those cases into a
political issue. Stepashin's statement follows the adoption of the
law on the counterintelligence organs and the re-creation of both
the Investigative and Special Operations Administrations of the
FSK. It may also be viewed as an indirect response to the attack
on the FSK by Vladimir Zhirinovsky, who called Stepashin an
"agent" of the Israeli Mossad and his service an "affiliate of the
CIA." Stepashin said he would sue the leader of the
ultranationalist Liberal Democratic Party. In view of these
developments, Stepashin's claims might well be regarded more as
salvos in a competition of patriotic rhetoric with Zhirinovsky
than as a true reflection of reality. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL,
Inc.

PAPER SAYS YELTSIN TO CUT DEFENSE MINISTRY. On 29 November
Nezavisimaya gazeta reported that Yeltsin had drafted a decree
cutting the Defense Ministry by 30 percent. The paper said that
the edict--already approved by the cabinet and Security
Council--would probably be signed on 1 December. It indicated that
several of Defense Minister Pavel Grachev's current deputies would
lose their jobs but did not mention any names. The Defense
Ministry has a staff of almost 9,000--twice as many as in Soviet
days--and the failure to reform it was one of the criticisms
Yeltsin made when he spoke to top military leaders earlier this
month. Last December there were rumors that Yeltsin was about to
order a similar reform of the Defense Ministry, but nothing
happened. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

DEFENSE CONVERSION AIDS CITY OF MOSCOW. An official of the Russian
State Defense Industry Committee told Interfax on 29 November that
his committee and the Moscow government had invested 61 billion
rubles ($200 million) in Moscow conversion projects during the
first nine months of 1994. Anatolii Safontev said one of the
benefits was that the city now needed to import less medical
equipment. He also said former defense plants were producing
electronic equipment for local environmental organizations as well
as equipment for cleaning the air and water. They also planned to
build micro-buses for the city. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

PAKISTAN TO BUY RUSSIAN JET FIGHTERS. Pakistani Defense Minister
Aftab Shaban Mirani announced in Islamabad that Russia had agreed
"in principle" to sell Su-27 jet fighters to Pakistan. As reported
by the Voice of Russia World Service, Mirani said that he believed
the Russian planes were better than comparable American models.
Pakistan had ordered and paid for American F-16 fighters, but the
deal has been held up because of American concern about Pakistan's
nuclear weapons program. A Russian military delegation is in
Islamabad, and the report said the final decision on the Su-27
purchase would be made in December when Pakistani Prime Minister
Benazir Bhutto visits Moscow. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

ACTIVITIES OF KAZAKHSTAN COSSACKS SUSPENDED. Kazakhstan's Ministry
of Justice has suspended the activities of the Semirechye Cossack
Society for six months after having warned the group that it was
violating the constitution, the country's laws on military
service, and its own charter, Interfax reported on 29 November.
Deputy Justice Minister Sergei Tikhonov said on republican TV
that, according to the group's charter, it was not a paramilitary
formation and did not pursue political goals or promote ethnic
intolerance. He added, though, that since its registration in July
it had been doing all of those things, starting with the
celebration of the society's registration at which many
participants appeared in Cossack military regalia. The society
organized an unauthorized demonstration in Almaty on 19 November,
for which two of the organizers have been arrested. -- Bess Brown,
RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

NEW COMMANDER APPOINTED TO BLACK SEA FLEET. ITAR-TASS reported on
29 November that Major General Ivan Fedin had been appointed to
replace Lieutenant General Nikolai Fadeev as commander of the
Black Sea Fleet's air forces. Fedin was born in 1947 and studied
at the military aviation school in Orenburg; he then attended the
Naval Academy and the General Staff Academy. Prior to his current
position, he was chief of staff of aviation of the Baltic Fleet.
It is believed that his appointment is only the first of a series
of personnel changes in the Black Sea Fleet. -- Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

MILITARY INTEGRATION MEASURES. Russia's Duma ratified on 25
November a package of military agreements recently signed by
Russia and other CIS states. The most significant is the
Russian-Belarusian agreement on the "status of Russian military
units, part of the strategic forces, temporarily stationed in
Belarus"--wording that allows for the stationing of various types
of units nominally allocated to the strategic forces. Russian
General Staff Chief Colonel General Mikhail Kolesnikov told the
Duma that the agreement "legalizes the presence of Russian forces
in Belarus," ITAR-TASS reported. The Duma also ratified two
Russian-Uzbek agreements, one on military cooperation and the
other on "joint technical and material provisioning of the two
states' armed forces"; two Russian-Kyrgyz agreements, one on
military cooperation and the other on "using Russian military
facilities in Kyrgyzstan"; and a Russian-Turkmen agreement on
military service by Russian Federation citizens in Turkmenistan's
armed forces. The agreements are purely bilateral, unrelated to
the CIS. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA IGNORING TROOP WITHDRAWAL AGREEMENT WITH MOLDOVA. Although
signed on 21 October, the agreement on the withdrawal of Russia's
14th Army from Moldova has not entered into force, because the
Russian side is not putting it through the "internal state
procedures" required under an article added at the last moment
under Russian pressure. The article specifies neither the nature
of those procedures nor a time frame for them. Inspecting the 14th
Army on 23 through 25 November, Russian Deputy Defense Minister
Georgii Kondratev told Radio Moscow on 24 November that the
ministry intended "in the near future to turn the 14th Army into a
military base." He told ITAR-TASS on 25 November that "there is no
mechanism for carrying out" the withdrawal agreement and that "to
ask for a calendar is simply absurd." He then told an assembly of
officers at 14th Army headquarters in Tiraspol, as quoted by
Interfax and Basapress, to "simply forget that such an agreement
exists and carry out the mission entrusted to them by the Russian
state," describing that mission as "peacekeeping." Kondratev
proposed to Moldovan leaders that the peacekeeping mandate be
transferred to the 14th Army from the small Russian peacekeeping
contingent in Moldova. He maintained that withdrawal was not on
the agenda as long as the agreement had not been ratified by the
Russian parliament. Moldovan leaders thought that they had an
understanding with Yeltsin that, as an executive agreement, the
accord was not subject to ratification by the Duma, where it is
likely to be blocked indefinitely by the hard-line majority. --
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

SERBS RECEIVE REINFORCEMENTS FOR ASSAULT ON BIHAC? AFP on 29
November cited Bosnian government sources as saying that as many
as 10,000 soldiers have arrived from Banja Luka to beef up Bosnian
and Croatian Serb forces attacking the UN-designated "safe area"
of Bihac. The Neue Zuercher Zeitung on 26 November quoted Croatian
President Franjo Tudjman as saying that forces from
Serbia-Montenegro are also involved, and the Society for
Threatened Peoples on 28 November cited Bosnian officials as
making the same charge. The Serbs are using their familiar tactic
of bombardment and have also installed SAM missile sites in the
area. The New York Times on 29 November suggested that the UN had
vetoed any NATO intention of attacking those sites, which prevent
NATO aircraft from supporting UN troops in the area. Finally,
Reuters said Bosnian Serb television showed footage of frightened
Muslim prisoners being forced to endure verbal and other insults
to their ethnic and religious identity and to chant: "Bosnia is
Serbian, just as Moscow is Russian." -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL,
Inc.

DIFFERENCES CONTINUE ON DIPLOMATIC FRONT OVER BOSNIA. US Senate
Republican leader Robert Dole is in Europe for talks with Western
leaders, and Bosnia appears to head the agenda. The senator is a
long-time advocate of linking the lifting of the arms embargo
against the Muslims with the provision of NATO air strikes against
the Serbs. In Brussels, he repeated his call for an end to the
embargo. He stressed there will be no settlement until pressure is
put on the Serbs to force them into reaching one and that at
present there is no such pressure. Elsewhere on the diplomatic
front, international news agencies on 30 November note that Russia
says it is drawing up a new plan to end the fighting in Bosnia,
while the BBC quotes US Secretary of State Warren Christopher as
saying Washington will propose another peace conference. Finally,
Germany's governing Christian Democratic Union called for a
possible lifting of the arms embargo, although German officials
reassured Paris that this does not mean Bonn is breaking ranks
with its EU allies. Germany has a huge number of guest workers and
refugees from the former Yugoslavia, and German public opinion is
generally sympathetic toward the Croatian and Bosnian causes. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINE WILL NOT PULL TROOPS OUT OF BOSNIA. UNIAN on 29 November
reported that Ukrainian Foreign Minister Affairs Volodymyr Handohy
said Ukraine had no plans to recall its servicemen serving with UN
peacekeeping forces in the former Yugoslavia. Nonetheless, he said
Ukraine's permanent mission to the UN had sent a note to the UN
secretary-general condemning the recent attacks on UN troops in
Bosnia, in which two Ukrainian soldiers were killed. He also said
Ukraine wanted better security guarantees for its forces serving
with the UN and would insist that a convention on the protection
of peacekeepers include a clause allowing countries to recall
their servicemen if the situation in combat zones deteriorated "in
the extreme." -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

DEVELOPMENTS IN CROATIA AND SLOVENIA. Vjesnik reports on 30
November that Croatian Defense Minister Gojko Susak has signed an
agreement on military cooperation during his visit to Washington.
Reuters the previous day quoted Slovenian President Milan Kucan as
saying that Italy is trying to reverse the outcome of World War II
"at the expense of a member of the former anti-fascist coalition."
Italy is blocking Slovenia's attempt to become an associate member
of the EU pending a settlement to the dispute over property and
citizenship rights of Italians who lived in what is now Slovenia
prior to 1945. Slovenia says the matter was settled in 1975 and
accuses the Italian Right of reviving the issue for domestic
political purposes. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLICE CRACK DOWN ON KOSOVAR UNIONISTS. At least 28 members of the
ethnic Albanian Kosovar Independent Trade Unions have been
arrested by Serbian police since 20 November, Rilindja reported on
24 and 25 November. All those arrested are former employees of the
police force or Interior Ministry and are suspected of
participating in the creation of the Kosovar shadow state.
According to Rilindja, the houses of the arrested unionists have
been raided and their family members beaten. The newspaper also
mentions cases of torture in prison. Meanwhile, the Association of
Kosovar Lawyers criticized arbitrary arrests in Kosovo and called
on international institutions to find a solution to the Kosovo
crisis within the framework of the negotiations on Bosnia and
Herzegovina. -- Fabian Schmidt, RFE/RL, Inc.

CONFUSION OVER NEW POLISH DEFENSE MINISTER. Prime Minister
Waldemar Pawlak on 29 November announced he would like to appoint
emigre politician Ryszard Kaczorowki as Poland's minister of
defense. Kaczorowski is 75 years old and lives in Britain. He
served for a few years until 1990 as president in the Polish
government in exile. According to Polish press reports, Pawlak's
announcement was received with astonishment both by leaders of the
government coalition, including members of his own party, and by
President Lech Walesa. Aleksander Kwasniewski, leader of the
postcommunist Alliance of the Democratic Left, said he was
"shocked" and found Kaczorowski's candidacy unacceptable. He also
said Pawlak's action was at variance with earlier agreements
within the coalition. Walesa's office refused to make any formal
comment. Kaczorowski was reportedly informed of Pawlak's designs
only after the prime minister had talked with Walesa. He promptly
turned down the offer on grounds of old age. -- Jan de Weydenthal,
RFE/RL, Inc.

NATIONAL BANK SLOWS DOWN RATE OF ZLOTY DEVALUATION. According to
Gazeta Wyborcza and Rzeczpospolita, Poland's National Bank has
announced that on 30 November, the monthly rate of the zloty
devaluation against Western currencies will change from 1.5 to 1.4
percent, making exports more expensive and imports cheaper. The
bank said its decision would slow down inflation, which is
estimated to reach about 29 percent in 1994. It also said the
devaluation change was made easier by the recent growth in
exports. This is the second such change in 1994. In September, the
bank lowered the devaluation rate from 1.6 to 1.5 percent. -- Jan
de Weydenthal , RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK CABINET APPROVES BUDGET DRAFT. The cabinet of outgoing
Premier Jozef Moravcik on 29 November approved the draft of the
1995 state budget, TASR reports. The draft allows for a budget
deficit of 12.8 billion koruny, or 2.93 percent of GDP. The
National Property Fund, which is charged with overseeing
privatization and whose assets are supposed to be separate from
the state budget, is expected to help service the debt by paying
out 18.5 billion koruny. The budget draft will be the main topic
of discussion at the third session of the parliament, which begins
on 13 December. Two privatization decisions approved at the second
session and later rejected by the president will also be
discussed. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAKIA'S REPLY TO EU DEMARCHE. Parliament chairman Ivan
Gasparovic on 29 November gave TASR a copy of Slovakia's response
to the European Union's recent demarche. The note states that
Slovakia appreciates the EU's interest in its reform process,
respects and follows all internationally established democratic
standards and conventions, aims to improve bilateral relations
with Hungary, strives to implement a market economy and cooperate
with all European countries, and remains committed to democratic
principles. German Foreign Minister Klaus Kinkel expressed
satisfaction with Slovakia's positive response. -- Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARY FORMALLY ABANDONS PLANS TO STAGE WORLD EXPO. Hungarian
Foreign Minister Laszlo Kovacs on 29 November informed President
of the Bureau of Exhibitions Ole Philippon that Hungary has
abandoned its plans to stage the 1996 World Fair. Kovacs stressed
the reasons for this decision were purely financial. The Hungarian
parliament voted earlier this month against hosting the World
Fair. Supporters of the Expo, who were mostly members of the
opposition parties, failed to collect enough valid signatures to
hold a referendum on hosting the fair. -- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL,
Inc.

HUNGARY'S CHURCHES APOLOGIZES OVER HOLOCAUST. Hungary's Roman
Catholic bishops and Ecumenical Church Council on 29 November
issued a joint statement asking for forgiveness and regretted the
"weaknesses" of Church members who "through fear or cowardice
allowed the mass deportation and assassination of their Jewish
compatriots" 50 years ago, MTI reports. The statement also honored
"those who at the cost of their own lives saved others during this
inhuman period." Some 600,000 Hungarian Jews perished during World
War II. -- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN PRESIDENT ADDRESSES WEU PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY.
Addressing the 40th ordinary session of the Parliamentary Assembly
of the Western European Union in Paris on 29 November, Ion Iliescu
described cooperation between his country and the WEU as
"extremely productive." He expressed the hope that Romania would
eventually be accepted into Euro-Atlantic structures, including
NATO and the European Union. Answering questions from
parliamentarians after his speech, Iliescu dwelt on the conflicts
in the former Yugoslavia and the presence of the 14th Russian army
in Eastern Moldova. Romania, which is an "associate partner" of
the WEU, is expected to become an "associate member" of that
organization in 1995. Under the Maastricht Treaty of European
Unity, the WEU is the European Union's defense arm. Also on 29
November, Iliescu met with French President Francois Mitterrand,
Radio Bucharest reported. -- Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN GOVERNMENT MARKS TWO YEARS IN POWER. Romanian Premier
Nicolae Vacaroiu on 28 and 29 November assessed his government's
performance after two years in office. Speaking on 28 November at
an extraordinary meeting of the Executive Bureau of the ruling
Party of Social Democracy in Romania, Vacaroiu said Romania was
emerging from the postcommunist economic and social crisis. He
admitted, however, that living standards remain low, despite
slight economic growth in 1993 and 1994. At a press conference on
29 November, Vacaroiu stressed again that Romania has achieved a
certain degree of economic stability but warned that further
privatization and restructuring were needed to consolidate this
positive trend. He also rejected accusations that his cabinet was
not interested in privatizing state-owned industries inherited
from the communist era. -- Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

GAZPROM AGAIN CUTS GAS TO UKRAINE. International agencies on 28
November reported that Gazprom has cut gas supplies to Ukraine yet
again, citing the failure of Ukrainian officials to renegotiate
gas contracts in time. Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma blamed
Ukrainian officials for the latest cut-off, saying Gazprom had
warned that the contracts were due to expire and would have to be
renegotiated. Ukraine's supply has been cut from 120,000 to some
60,000 million cubic meters per day. Statistics director of the
Ukrainian State Gas Committee Tadai Mykhailivich said Russia is
unable to cut off all gas supplies. When asked about alleged
siphoning from the pipelines, he said everyone knew what was going
on. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

LUKASHENKA'S LATEST MOVES AGAINST CORRUPTION. Belarusian President
Alyaksandr Lukashenka has dismissed Trade Minister Valentyn Baidak
for corrupt dealings, Belarusian Television reported on 28
November. According to the deputy head of the committee on
anticorruption in government, Mikalai Karpeevich, Baidak had
unlawfully acquired two apartments. Karpeevich added that his
committee would pass on the relevant documents to the
prosecutor-general's office. Belarusian Radio reported that
Lukashenka plans this week to appoint regional heads responsible
directly to him . Lukashenka believes such a hierarchy will mean
fewer opportunities for corrupt dealings in the regional governing
bodies. which, he says, are "financially and spiritually
bankrupt." -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUSIAN FOREIGN AFFAIRS. An Iranian delegation met with
Belarusian Prime Minister Mikhail Chyhir and Deputy Prime Minister
Valeri Kokarau in Minsk, Belarusian Radio reported on 29 November.
The officials discussed trade and economic relations between the
two countries. Belarus is interested in trading tractors and other
products for Iranian oil. The delegation also discussed opening an
Iranian embassy in Minsk. The same day, Interfax reported that an
Estonian delegation led by the deputy chancellor of the Foreign
Ministry, Raul Malk, arrived in Minsk for meetings with Belarusian
Foreign Minister Uladzimir Syanko. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVA-EU AGREEMENT. Moldova on 28 November became the first of
the smaller ex-Soviet republics to sign a partnership and
cooperation agreement with the EU. Russia and Ukraine have already
concluded such an agreement. Signed in Brussels by President
Mircea Snegur, EU Commission Deputy Chairman Sir Leon Brittan, EU
Ministerial Council Chairman Klaus Kinkel, and representatives of
the EU's twelve member states, the agreement provides inter alia
for high-level political consultations, reciprocal preferential
trading terms, and investment promotion. It also opens the way for
similar agreements between Moldova and the EU's individual member
states. The EU said in a statement that "Moldova's independence
and territorial integrity are important to the security of the
region and of Europe." It also noted the progress of Moldova's
economic reforms and pledged continued financial support, an
RFE/RL correspondent reported. Snegur termed the agreement
"historic for Moldova" and "reflecting Moldova's aspiration to be
part of Europe." -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

BALTIC DEFENSE CHIEFS PLEDGE TO INCREASE COOPERATION. Meeting on
28 and 29 November in Tallinn, the commanders of the Baltic armed
forces--Aleksander Einseln of Estonia, Juris Dalbins of Latvia,
and Jonas Andriskevicius of Lithuania--said their countries would
cooperate more closely on military issues and would strive for a
speedy integration into European military structures. Asked about
Baltic-Russian relations, Einseln said there was currently "no
particular military cooperation" between the Baltics and Russia
and that this was an issue for the future. The three commanders
also told BNS that a joint working group, headed by Estonian Chief
of Staff Arvo Sirel, had been formed to coordinate Baltic
activities within the NATO Partnership for Peace program. They
agreed that the Baltic States would seek to take part in NATO's
Baltic Operations '95; but their participation in these naval
maneuvers may be hindered by financial restraints. The three
commanders also signed an accord on exploring the possibility of
establishing a joint air-space control system. -- Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL, Inc.

LATVIAN POLITICAL PARTIES START PREPARATIONS FOR 1995 ELECTIONS.
The People's Front of Latvia on 26 November chose 25 candidates
for the Latvian parliamentary elections, set for October 1995.
Also with an eye on the elections, leaders of Latvia's National
Conservative Party (formed on the basis of Latvia's National
Independence Movement) and Latvia's Green Party on 29 November
signed an agreement to cooperate and draw up a joint list of
candidates for the Saeima, Diena reported on 27 and 29 November.
-- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

FORMER ESTONIAN PREMIER ARRESTED ON BRIBERY CHARGES. Indrek Toome,
Estonian prime minister from 1988 to 1990, was arrested in Tallinn
on 28 November in a sting operation after giving a police official
30,000 kroons ($2,400) for three fraudulent Estonian passports,
BNS reported on 29 November. The passports belonged to a Russian
businessman and his wife and daughter who had given false data to
obtain Estonian citizenship. Toome will be held in a Tallinn
prison for ten days while investigators gather evidence. If
convicted, he could be fined or sentenced to a maximum two-year
prison sentence. Interior Minister Kaido Kama said that the case
was a "precedent that helps cleanse society" and that businessmen
would be more reluctant to try to offer bribes. -- Saulius
Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

LITHUANIAN PROSECUTOR-GENERAL CANDIDATE REJECTED. The Seimas on 29
November rejected the candidacy of Justinas Vasiliauskas, director
of the Interior Ministry's Investigations Department, for the post
of prosecutor-general, RFE/RL's Lithuanian Service reports.
President Algirdas Brazauskas nominated Vasiliauskas to replace
Arturas Paulauskas, appointed to that post in March 1990. A major
objection to Vasiliauskas was that his wife was a cousin of Prime
Minister Adolfas Slezevicius. The parliament's decision to appoint
a new prosecutor-general before 1 December will not be heeded,
because Brazauskas departed on 30 November for a three-day visit
to Italy. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Jan Cleave and Penny Morvant)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
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