You see things and you say 'Why?' But I dream thing that never were; and I say, 'Why not?'. - Geroge Bernard Shaw
RFE/RL DAILY REPORT

NO. 222, 23 NOVEMBER 1994


NOTICE TO READERS: The Daily Report will not appear on 24 and
25 November.

                           RUSSIA

KOZYREV CAUTIOUS ON BOSNIAN AIRSTRIKES. According to Russian
Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev, Russia has profound
reservations about the 21 November UN-backed NATO airstrike
on a Krajina Serb airfield, Reuters reported on 22 November.
The strike, prompted by rebel Krajina Serb air attacks on
targets in northwestern Bosnia, was initially supported by
Moscow. Kozyrev reportedly said that NATO airstrikes should
not become a common occurrence and that in future such
actions could prompt a withdrawal of Russian peacekeepers
from Bosnia. He added: "We were assured that the strike was a
preventative action and not a punishment. Let us hope it was
really so." Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

INGUSH ACCUSE MOSCOW OF BIAS. On Russian Radio on 22 November
Ingush President Ruslan Aushev accused the Russian Federal
Counterintelligence Service of giving President Boris Yeltsin
misleading information on the basis of which decisions were
made favoring North Ossetia. The same day Ingushetia's
Presidential Council denounced the performance of the
Provisional Administration for North Ossetia and
Ingushetia--the body instituted by Moscow in 1992 to
administer the state of emergency in the area--for its
pro-Ossetian bias and failure to repatriate the Ingush
population expelled from Prigorodnyi Raion in North Ossetia.
In accompanying statements, Aushev and the Council of Social
Organizations called for the replacement of Provisional
Administration head Vladimir Lozovoi because of his
partiality, and for the administration to be moved from North
Ossetia's capital Vladikavkaz to Prigorodnyi Raion. Aushev
further called on Yeltsin to put an end to the violation of
the rights of the Ingush as Russian Federation citizens.
Human rights campaigner Elena Bonner, heading a delegation of
the Andrei Sakharov Fund, arrived in Ingushetia's capital
Nazran on 19 November to investigate human rights and
refugees problems. Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW FIGURES ON RUSSIAN-SOVIET DEBT. According to a Finance
Ministry document circulated at a closed session of the State
Duma cited by Reuters, the debts of the former Soviet Union
totaled $112.7 billion at the start of 1994, much higher than
previously believed. Soviet debts stood at $103.94 billion
and Russian debts at $8.84 billion. Germany was the USSR's
largest creditor, owed $15.9 billion. Russia assumed
responsibility for repaying the debts of the former USSR when
the latter collapsed, but it has had to seek rescheduling
deals to give it extra time to pay. Penny Morvant, RFE/RL,
Inc.

"MOST" TO FINANCE YABLOKO? The powerful financial group
"Most" will back the tandem of Moscow Mayor Yurii Luzhkov and
Yabloko leader Grigorii Yavlinsky against the
Yeltsin-Chernomyrdin team, Rossiiskaya gazeta reported on 20
November. "Most," an official banking and credit institution
of the Moscow government, is not only active in the financial
and construction sectors but also controls the national
newspaper Segodnya, the commercial television channel NTV,
the radio station Ekho Moskvy, and several other mass media
organizations. To promote its candidates, "Most" has
organized a campaign group headed by Obshchaya gazeta chief
editor Egor Yakovlev. The financial group's analytical
department employs several senior former KGB officers,
including former Deputy Chairman of the KGB Fillip Bobkov.
Bobkov was responsible for the KGB's ideological
counterintelligence, which monitored public and informal
organizations, and is reputed to be very well informed about
the former Soviet intelligentsia. Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL,
Inc.

DUMA DEBATES NEW ELECTION LEGISLATION. The Duma must adopt a
new election law before the end of the constitutional
moratorium on disbanding the Duma, which runs out on 12
December, Duma First Deputy Chairman Mikhail Mityukov told
ITAR-TASS on 21 November. (The current constitution, adopted
on 12 December 1993, forbids the Russian president to disband
the parliament or to call new elections for one year.)
Alternative legislative packages were introduced by the
presidential administration, Duma committees, and Yavlinsky,
Nezavisimaya gazeta reported on 19 November. The draft laws
deal with referenda, presidential elections, and
parliamentary elections. Yavlinsky's draft includes an upper
age limit for the president, which would exclude Yeltsin. The
number of competing bills could mean that none are adopted by
the deadline. In this event, new elections would be conducted
according to a presidential decree. Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL,
Inc.

ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN BORDER DISPUTE UPDATE. Yeltsin, accompanied
by Russian Border Guard head Colonel General Andrei Nikolaev,
will inspect the Estonian-Russian border during his one-day
visit to Pskov on 23 November, Interfax reported. Yeltsin
ordered the start of unilateral marking of the border along
the temporary control line with Estonia in June. Most work so
far has been done in southeastern Estonia, where by the end
of last week Russian border guards had erected 523 border
posts and 1,830 meters of barbed-wire fences. Estonia has
objected to the work, insisting that the border with Russia
run according to the Tartu Peace Treaty of 1920, under which
parts of Pskov Oblast belonged to Estonia. Moscow maintains
that the Tartu Peace Treaty is no longer valid. Vello
Saatpalu, chairman of the Estonian parliament's foreign
affairs commission, told Interfax on 21 November that Estonia
should give up its territorial claims on Russia. But he added
that he hoped Russia would amend the border in the
southeastern sector in accordance with the needs of the Setu
nationality there. Saatpalu said: "What we need are only
local exchanges of small amounts of territory." Dzintra
Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

TERRITORIAL DISPUTE NO OBSTACLE TO ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN TRADE.
Economic links between Pskov Oblast and adjacent areas of
Estonia are developing despite the border dispute, according
to Vladislav Tumanov, the head of the Pskov Oblast
administration. Tumanov told BNS and RIA on 22 November that
Estonian businessmen were especially interested in forging
better ties with the Pskov region. Last week the Pskov
administration reached an agreement with the Estonian Tourist
Board on the reestablishment of tourism between Pskov and
Estonia. Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

JAPANESE MILITARY DELEGATION IN MOSCOW. A visiting Japanese
military delegation held talks with their Russian
counterparts on 22 November in Moscow. Interfax reported that
the talks dealt with the problems of strategic stability in
Asia and the Pacific as well as the prospects for broader
contacts between the armed forces of the two countries.
Lieutenant General Vladimir Zhurbenko, who headed the Russian
delegation, said that a possible visit to Russia by the head
of the Japanese Defense Agency had also been discussed.
Russia's failure to return to Japan four islands in the
southern Kuril chain seized at the end of World War II has
impeded Russo-Japanese relations. Russian First Deputy Prime
Minister Oleg Soskovets--who is to visit Japan soon--told the
Japanese ambassador in Moscow the same day that Russia was
ready to discuss the problem of the islands but that the
issue would not be on the agenda for his visit. Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL, Inc.

POSSIBLE SPACE LAUNCH SITE IN SOUTH AMERICA. Anatolii
Kiselev, the general director of Russia's Khrunichev space
research and production center, told Interfax on 22 November
that the French aerospace company Aerospatiale had agreed in
principle to Khrunichev's plan to build a space launching
site at Kourou, French Guyana. Aerospatiale builds the
Arian-4 boosters that are used to launch some 60 percent of
the world's commercial satellites and launches them from this
South American facility. Khrunichev would build a launching
pad for its Proton-M rocket alongside the French facilities
and share much of their infrastructure. Kiselev stressed that
the project still needed more preparation as well as the
support of all governments concerned--including the United
States. Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

AMERICAN JET ENGINE MAKER IN RUSSIAN JOINT VENTURE. Interfax
reported on 22 November that the US Pratt & Whitney company
had signed an agreement the previous day to set up a joint
venture to build jet aircraft engines in Perm in cooperation
with Aviadvigatel and Perm Motors. Pratt & Whitney's parent
organization--United Technologies--said it was planning to
invest $150 million in the Russian economy, and the report
speculated that it would all go into this project. The
engines would be used in the new generation of Ilyushin and
Tupolev airliners. Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

               TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

KAZAKHSTAN'S REFORMS IN TROUBLE. At a press conference on 21
November, Kazakhstan's Minister of Justice Nagashbai
Shaikenov circulated a statement asserting that the opponents
of political and economic reform in the country had united to
slow the pace of change and naming President Nursultan
Nazarbaev's adviser Kairbek Suleimenov as the coordinator of
resistance to reform of the judicial system, Russian news
agencies reported on 22 November. According to Shaikenov,
Suleimenov recently ordered judicial and law-enforcement
officials to revise a program for judicial reform that had
already been approved by the president. An Interfax report on
Shaikenov's charges noted that Nazarbaev entrusted Suleimenov
with many complex issues, including dealing with interethnic
relations. It was Suleimenov who met with Cossack
representatives (see Daily Report for 22 November) and
rejected their request for a presidential commission on
Cossack affairs. Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

URANIUM FROM KAZAKHSTAN TAKEN TO US. US news agencies
reported on 23 November that a large quantity of
weapons-grade uranium that had been stored at Ust-Kamenogorsk
had been shipped to the US in the last month with the
agreement of the government of Kazakhstan. According to The
Washington Post, this is the first time that such material
has been collected by the US from a part of the former USSR
for reprocessing. The uranium from Kazakhstan is to become
fuel for nuclear power plants. The reports did not disclose
the price paid for the uranium; one of the sticking points
for Kazakhstan in agreeing to give up the nuclear weapons it
inherited following the disintegration of the USSR has been
its desire to retain the enriched uranium contained in the
weapons. Reports that Iran has tried to buy weapons-grade
uranium from Kazakhstan have surfaced repeatedly since the
latter gained independence, intensifying Western concern
about Kazakhstan's uranium. According to the Los Angeles
Times, earlier in the year Kazakhstani leaders asked for US
help in disposing of the material stored at Ust-Kamenogorsk.
Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                             CIS

PEACEKEEPING: RUSSIA VERSUS CSCE. In preparatory negotiations
in Budapest for the CSCE's upcoming summit there, Russian
delegates have rejected successive drafts of documents that
would give the CSCE a substantive role in peacekeeping
operations in the newly independent states, RFE/RL's
correspondent reported on 21 November. In negotiations
focusing on Karabakh, the Russian side has insisted on using
only Russian and a few token CIS units for peacekeeping under
nominal CSCE auspices, whereas most other delegations favor
an international force, including Russian units, under
effective CSCE control. European diplomats were quoted as
saying they believed Russia was stalling, awaiting the
outcome of talks in Moscow, Washington, and at NATO
headquarters on a new European security concept. Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

BLESSED ARE THE PEACEKEEPERS. Russian troops acting as CIS
peacekeepers in Tajikistan inaugurated on 20 November a
Russian Orthodox church building on a tank base, ITAR-TASS
reported on 20 November. Termed a "campaign church" and
dedicated to St. George the Victorious (a Tsarist military
symbol), the church was inaugurated with a service celebrated
by Archbishop Vladimir of Central Asia and Dushanbe. Colonel
General Valerii Patrikeev, commander in chief of CIS
peacekeeping forces in Tajikistan, told the Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung of 19 November that "we regard
Tajikistan's southern border not only as a Tajik-Afghan
border but as the border of Russia." Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL,
Inc.

                 CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BIHAC FIGHTING CONTINUES TO RAGE. International media report
that fighting in Bihac, in northwestern Bosnia, continues to
rage. According to the Croatian agency Hina on 22 November,
Serbian forces and Muslims loyal to the rebel leader Fikret
Abdic intensified their attacks on several areas, including
the town of Velika Kladusa, Abdic's former stronghold and
headquarters. Reuters reported the same day that a Serbian
helicopter fired rockets at the town of Gata Ilidza, in
northwestern Bosnia, during the night of 21 November.
According to Sarajevo Radio on 22 November, the town of Bihac
was under fierce attack and was being "destroyed." Meanwhile,
Borba on 23 November reports that Bosnian Serb General Ratko
Mladic, in what appears to be a show of Bosnian Serb resolve
to press ahead with the hostilities, wrote in a letter to
UNPROFOR that the recent NATO bombing of the Udbina airfield
in the rebel Serb-occupied region of Croatia known as Krajina
is likely to intensify the fighting. In the largest military
operation in its history, NATO on 21 November launched an air
strike against the Udbina airfield. The next day, UN
officials warned advancing Serbian forces not to enter the
Bihac safe area, saying such a move could trigger renewed
NATO air strikes. Finally, the Bosnian capital of Sarajevo
was relatively calm on 22 November, but UNPROFOR personnel
remained on yellow alert. Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

BOSNIAN MUSLIM SENTENCED FOR WAR CRIMES. International
agencies on 22 November reported that Refic Saric, a Bosnian
Muslim, was sentenced to eight years in prison for war crimes
committed while serving as a guard in a Croat-run prison camp
in Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1993. Saric, standing trial in a
Danish court, was convicted on fourteen counts of gross
violence and for torturing prisoners to such an extent that
some died of their injuries. The Danish court ruling is the
first in a lengthy series of war crimes trials to be
adjudicated outside the former Yugoslavia. In other news,
Reuters on 22 November reported that Dusko and Vojin
Vuckovic, two Serbian brothers, were brought before a rump
Yugoslav court the same day on charges of committing war
crimes, including murder and rape. This is the first war
crimes trial to be held in rump Yugoslavia. Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND DISAPPOINTED WITH EU POLICY. Polish ambassador to the
European Union Jan Kolakowski on 22 November said his
government was worried about the union's reluctance to invite
East Central European countries to it summit meeting in Essen
in December. He noted his government had been told that
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl initially intended to invite
those countries but might have changed his mind in the face
of opposition from other EU states--particularly France,
which plans to organize a EU summit meeting next June in
Cannes. The acceptance of France's plans could lead to the
postponement of the Essen meeting. Whether or not the East
Central Europeans will be invited to the Cannes meeting is
still uncertain. Kolakowski's remarks were made during a
press conference on EU policy toward East Central European
countries. According to Gazeta Wyborcza on 23 November,
Poland is disappointed by that policy, which it sees as
limited to agreements on formal meetings between various
officials rather than the long-advocated liberalization of
trade between the EU and East Central Europe. Jan de
Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

AFRICAN AMBASSADOR TO POLAND "LIVES AMONG PAUPERS." According
to Rzeczpospolita on 23 November, Zaire's ambassador to
Poland was recently robbed at a Warsaw railroad station,
where he was forced to spend the night among paupers,
beggars, and winos. The newspaper said the government in
Kinshasa stopped funding its embassy more than a year ago and
apparently expressed a lack of interest in its ambassador
when challenged by the Polish government. The ambassador was
apparently turned out of his apartment because he had not
paid the rent and had been forced to sell both his car and
clothes. The newspaper added that he was continuing to work
in the embassy during the day, however. Jan de Weydenthal,
RFE/RL, Inc.

DIFFERENCES IN CZECH, RUSSIAN SECURITY VIEWS. Vladimir Lukin,
chairman of the Russian State Duma's Foreign Affairs
Committee, told journalists in Prague on 22 November that
Russia and the Czech Republic hold different views on
European security issues. Lukin was speaking at a press
conference after his meeting with Czech Foreign Minister
Josef Zieleniec. Lukin commented that the Czech Republic
would like to join NATO without considering the broader
consequences. Broader forms of European cooperation and
security should be sought that could include Czechs, Slovaks,
Ukrainians, Russians, Germans, and the French, he proposed.
Lukin said both sides agreed to continue holding talks on
security issues. Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

FINAL RESULTS OF CZECH LOCAL ELECTIONS. Associations of
independent candidates and independent candidates running
individually won 39.1 percent and 10.6 percent of seats in
municipal councils, respectively, in the Czech local
elections held on 18 and 19 November, CTK reported on 22
November. The Christian and Democratic Union won 12.4 percent
of the mandates and the Civic Democratic Party of Prime
Minister Vaclav Klaus placed third, with 11 percent. The CDP
won the largest share of the popular vote of all political
parties--28.7 percent. The Communist Party of Bohemia and
Moravia placed second, with 13.4 percent, followed by the
Social Democrats (8.1 percent). A total of 62.3 percent of
the Czech electorate participated in the elections. Jiri
Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLITICAL SQUABBLING CONTINUES IN SLOVAKIA. A five-member
commission set up by the parliament's Mandate and Immunity
Committee ruled on 22 November that the Democratic Union did
not have the 10,000 signatures required to participate in
this fall's parliamentary elections. The commission,
established at the initiative of the Movement for a
Democratic Slovakia, is composed of four MDS members and one
member of the Slovak National Party, the MDS's ally. The MDS
had previously asked the Constitutional Court to rule on the
matter, hoping to have the DU deputies removed from the
parliament, but the court rejected its complaint on 27
October. Association of Slovak Workers member Miroslav
Kocnar, who chairs the Mandate and Immunity Committee, said
the DU deputies will not be removed; rather, the goal of the
commission was to give the MDS "moral satisfaction." DU
Chairman and outgoing Premier Jozef Moravcik criticized the
commission's findings, calling them an effort to discredit
not only the DU but also its voters, TASR reports. Sharon
Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN NATIONAL BANK CHIEF RESIGNS. President of the
Hungarian National Bank Akos Peter Bod has resigned as of 14
December because of political tensions between him and the
ruling Hungarian Socialist Party. Bod was appointed under the
previous administration for six years. Hungarian Prime
Minister Gyula Horn has accepted his resignation. Bod is to
become Hungary's executive president of the European Bank for
Reconstruction and Development effective 1 January 1995.
Judith Pataki, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARY INTRODUCES NATIONWIDE CLEARING SYSTEM. A nationwide
clearing system connecting all Hungarian banks was installed
on 18 November, Magyar Hirlap reports. The system allows
money to be transferred immediately; such transfers have
until now taken up to ten days. The system--the largest in
Hungary and the first of its kind in Eastern Europe--was
installed after several delays. Judith Pataki, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEWSPRINT CRISIS IN ROMANIA. Prime Minister Nicolae Vacaroiu,
meeting with the directors and editors in chief of the
country's main dailies on 22 November, promised to take
measures to solve the country's newsprint crisis. Romania's
only producer of newsprint, the state-owned Letea company,
announced a few days earlier that it can no longer provide
supplies. The announcement aroused suspicion among editors
that the government was attempting to silence criticism of
its policies and use the crisis to introduce backdoor
censorship. Vacaroiu said custom duties on newsprint would be
temporarily reduced if Letea proved unable to make
deliveries. Earlier on 22 November, Ion Cristoiu, editor in
chief of the country's leading daily, Evenimentul zilei, told
RFE/RL's correspondent in Bucharest that his paper would have
to triple its newsstand price if it had to use newsprint from
abroad. Vacaroiu also said the government wanted to improve
the state-owned distribution system and was willing to offer
guarantees for importing equipment and setting up new
printing presses with private capital. Michael Shafir,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN PYRAMID SCHEME OWNER STILL IN CUSTODY. A court of
justice on 22 November refused to release the owner of the
failed Caritas investment scheme, which depleted the savings
of hundreds of thousands of Romanians, Reuters reported. Ion
Stoica, the owner of the scheme, has been detained for three
months after he failed to pay the investors back. The
Bucharest district court approved a prosecution request to
keep Stoica in custody. He faces up to seven years in jail on
charges of inaccurate accounting, falsifying bankruptcy,
forgery, and fraud. Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

BULGARIAN COURT LIMITS PARTIES' MEDIA ACCESS. RFE/RL's
Bulgarian Service on 22 November reported that Bulgaria's
Supreme Court has upheld a ruling by the Central Election
Commission effectively limiting radio and television air time
during the current election campaign to three parties--the
Bulgarian Socialist Party, the Union of Democratic Forces,
and the Turkish Minority Rights and Freedom Party. The
Central Election Commission held that only those parties that
had parliamentary representation after the 1991
elections--meaning only those named above--would be granted
access to the national media for campaigning purposes. At
least 49 parties will vie for seats in the elections,
scheduled for 18 December. Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENT MEETS CLINTON. Leonid Kuchma signed two
agreements with his US counterpart, Bill Clinton, on 22
November following talks in the White House, international
agencies report. One accord was on US-Ukrainian relations and
the other on space cooperation. US Secretary of Commerce Ron
Brown signed an agreement with Ukrainian Minister of Foreign
Economic Affairs Serhii Osyka on trade and investment
protection. Clinton also offered an additional $200 million
in aid to Ukraine. The first $100 million would be a "no
strings attached" grant for importing food and fuel; the
other $100 million is to be used for privatization, small
businesses, and student exchanges. US aid to Ukraine now
totals $900 million, making Ukraine the US's fourth largest
aid recipient, after Israel, Egypt, and Russia. Kuchma warned
Clinton against moving too quickly to expand NATO, saying
this risked antagonizing Russia and, in such an event,
Ukraine would likely become a border country in a new cold
war. The warm reception Kuchma received contrasts markedly
with his treatment when he visited the US as prime minister
in early 1993. Clinton had refused to meet with him during
that visit, which took place before Ukraine ratified the
START-1 agreement. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

ENERGY CRISIS IN BELARUS. In an interview with Belarusian
Radio on 22 November, Deputy Prime Minister Valeryi Kokarau
gave details of the republic's negotiations with its Russian
gas supplier, Gazprom. According to Kokarau, Gazprom cut its
gas deliveries to Belarus by half on 17 November owing to
payment arrears. Talks began immediately in Moscow on the
resumption of deliveries, and on 18 November gas supplies
began to be increased. Normal levels were reached by 21
November. Gazprom's conditions for the resumption of supplies
were that Belarus regularly make full payments on any gas it
receives and that a schedule be drawn up for paying off its
$460 million debt. Kokarau said the debt may have to be paid
off partly by foreign credits. He also noted that if Belarus
can pay off its entire debt, it may receive gas in 1995 for
1994 prices--$50 per 1,000 cubic meters (the world price is
$80). The republic needs some 16 billion cubic meters of gas
each year. As for oil, Kokarau said Belarus would have to
negotiate the price with Russia's 10 oil companies. At the
moment the republic is paying $74-75 per ton (the world price
stands at $110). It needs a minimum of 10 million tons of oil
annually. Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN CALL FOR WESTERN PEACEKEEPING ROLE. Addressing the
North Atlantic Assembly's annual session in Washington and in
meetings with US Vice President Al Gore and State Department
and Pentagon officials, Moldovan Parliament Deputy Chairman
Nicolae Andronic called for Western participation in the
peacekeeping operation in Moldova. Russia is withdrawing most
of its peacekeeping contingent from Moldova, claiming that it
can no longer meet the costs of the operation and that the
region is stable. The vacuum is being filled by Transdniester
forces, which the Russian side permitted to establish
positions in the disengagement zone, in violation of the
armistice convention. Andronic also appealed for Western
assistance in obtaining the withdrawal of Russia's 14th Army
(which is separate from the peacekeeping contingent) from
Moldova and in monitoring the withdrawal once it gets under
way. The Russian-Moldovan agreement on the withdrawal, though
signed, will not enter into force and remains nonbinding
until the Russian government finally approves it. Moscow,
however, is withholding its approval. Andronic also
reaffirmed that Moldova refuses to be represented
internationally by any supranational or coordinating body of
the CIS. Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

DANISH FOREIGN MINISTER IN LITHUANIA. At a press conference
on 22 November, Niels Helveg Petersen urged Lithuania and
Russia to sign a military transit agreement that would
increase stability in the Baltic region, Radio Lithuania
reports. Petersen said such an agreement would not harm
Lithuania's chances of joining Western institutions. He
suggested that Denmark was not in favor of a quick expansion
of NATO but preferred to see "suitable preparation" through
the Partnership for Peace program. Petersen said the Baltic
States might be able to become full members of the European
Union around 2000. He then traveled to Kaunas, where he gave
a speech on Lithuania and the EU at the Kaunas Technological
University. The previous day, he held meetings with President
Algirdas Brazauskas, Foreign Minister Povilas Gylys, and
Defense Minister Linas Linkevicius. Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL,
Inc.

LITHUANIAN PARLIAMENT CHAIRMAN IN GERMANY. A Lithuanian
parliament delegation, headed by chairman Ceslovas Jursenas,
arrived in Wiesbaden on 21 November. Jursenas gave a speech
on "Lithuania's Integration into European Economic and
Security Structures" at the biannual "European Week"
conference, which is devoted to possible problems arising
from the membership of Central and East European states in
the European Union. The delegation also participated in the
opening ceremonies of the "Lithuanian Culture Days" in
Hessen. Jursenas on 22 November addressed a session of the
Hessen parliament and held talks with its deputies and
business representatives, Radio Lithuania reports. The
delegation also visited the only Lithuanian-language high
school in the West, located in the town of Huttenfeld, before
returning to Lithuania on 23 November. Saulius Girnius,
RFE/RL, Inc.

THIRD LATVIAN DEPUTY ACQUITTED OF KGB CHARGES. The Jurmala
City Court on 22 November found Saeima deputy Roberts
Milbergs not guilty of having collaborated with the KGB. The
court said the evidence against Milbergs provided by former
KGB employees could have been forged. In addition, the person
who allegedly recruited Milbergs to serve as an informer is
now dead, making it impossible to verify the accusation. It
is unclear whether Prosecutor Peteris Dzalbe will appeal the
verdict, Baltic media reported. Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET]

(Compiled by Penny Morvant and Jan Cleave)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
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Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


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