Treat your friends as you do your pictures, and place them in their best light. - Jennie Jerome Churchill
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 214, 10 November 1994

                              RUSSIA

CHERNOMYRDIN CONFIDENT THAT BUDGET WILL BE APPROVED. Russian Prime
Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin expressed confidence on 9 November
that the draft 1995 state budget will be approved by both houses
of parliament, Interfax reported. Speaking in the town of Kirovsk,
near Murmansk, Chernomyrdin described the draft budget as "not
simply austere, but even cruel." He said 1995 must become a
decisive year otherwise Russia will have to start over again.
Chernomyrdin said the budget would make it possible to attain the
key economic goals of bringing monthly inflation down to no more
than two percent and stabilizing the financial situation. -- Pete
Baumgartner, RFE/RL, Inc.

ZHIRINOVSKY VISA ANGERS MP. Sergei Yushenkov, chairman of the
State Duma's Defense Committee, told Interfax on 9 November that
he was suspending all contacts with U.S. politicians until the
State Department explains why it had granted an entry visa to
Vladimir Zhirinovsky and other members of his party. Yushenkov
explained that he was bewildered by the situation in which
"elements with fascist-like tendencies" had been admitted to the
U.S. while other Russians were denied entry. He pointed to the
case of Pyotr Grigorenko--whom he described as the son of "a
well-known defender of human rights"--who was only granted a visa
to visit his sick mother after two parliamentarians concerned with
human rights issues intervened on his behalf. -- Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL, Inc.

FIVE KILLED IN RUSSIAN OMON RAID IN INGUSHETIA. A 30-strong OMON
unit of Russia's Ministry of Internal Affairs raided the village
of Altievo in Ingushetia's Nazran raion on 6 November,
Nezavisimaya gazeta reported on 9 November. The unit was allegedly
searching for "criminal participants" in the October-November 1992
clashes in North Ossetia's Prigorodnyi raion, whose Ingush
population was, however, attacked and "ethnically cleansed" into
Ingushetia on that occassion by the North Ossetians with Russian
military support. The OMON unit raiding Nazran was met with
resistance by local residents. Three officers and two villagers
were killed, while others were wounded, some severely. Six
villagers were detained in the raid. Ingush President Ruslan
Aushev (a former Russian general) described the raid as "an
attempt to disrupt the incipient process of repatriating the
Ingush refugees to North Ossetia's Prigorodnyi raion." A rally was
held on 9 November on the central square of Ingushetia's capital
Nazran to protest the OMON action, Interfax reported. -- Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

WORLD BANK APPROVES ENVIRONMENT LOAN FOR RUSSIA. The World Bank
has approved a $110 million loan to Russia to help underwrite a
program to begin dealing with massive deterioration in the
environment, an RFE/RL correspondent reported 8 November. The
project, to cost $194.8 million, will develop national
institutions, management capabilities, data bases and cleanup
methods and systems. Most of the costs will be borne by the
Russian government and by domestic enterprises and banks. In
addition to organizing national standards, the management project
will finance initial regional programs in the Upper Volga, the
Urals, and north Caucasus. The World Bank says that "environmental
degradation" is evident everywhere in Russia because of
mismanagement "traced to decades of inefficient economic
development that basically failed to include environmental
factors." -- Robert Lyle, RFE/RL, Inc.

AIR FORCE GENERALS DISMISSED, SUE, AND ARE SACKED AGAIN. Two Air
Force generals disciplined after a military plane crash in Siberia
on 5 August were dismissed from the military by order of President
Yeltsin after they sued Defense Minister Pavel Grachev to protest
his similar actions. Lt.-Gen. Anatoliy Vasilyev was commander of
the 23rd Air Army in the Transbaikal military district and Maj.
Gen. Vladimir Zagitov his chief of staff when a military An-12
crashed at a military airport in Boda, near Lake Baikal, causing
the deaths of 47 servicemen and dependents. According to ITAR-TASS
and Interfax of 9 November, Air Force chief Pyotr Deynekin
investigated the accident and recommended to Grachev that the two
officers be dismissed. When the two sued Grachev, Yeltsin on 28
October dismissed them himself--ending the military court's
jurisdiction. The two filed another lawsuit in the same court on 9
November, this time against Deynekin, seeking to reverse his
original recommendation. Deynekin admits his action was harsh, but
said "I cannot forgive the heavy loss of life, which was due to
gross errors" made by the two officers. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL,
Inc.

BOGOMOLOV, KARASIN IN ROMANIA. The noted Russian economist and
foreign policy analyst Oleg Bogomolov, vice chairman of the Duma's
Foreign Relations Committee, and Grigorii Karasin, the Russian
Foreign Ministry's chief spokesman, paid separate visits to
Romania on 7-9 November for talks with senior foreign ministry
officials and parliamentary leaders. Bogomolov told Radio
Bucharest on 8 November that "the difficulties were not resolved"
in connection with the draft interstate treaty. Romania insists on
including a condemnation of the Ribbentrop-Molotov pact in
language implying an admission of Russian responsibility for its
effects on Romania and some recognition of Romanian rights to
Bessarabia and northern Bukovina. Bogomolov countered with a
proposal that Romania condemn its own "participation alongside
fascist Germany in the war of aggression against the USSR," which
Romania should find easy to offer "since it does not subscribe to
fascist ideology as it did in the past." In more conciliatory
remarks to Radio Bucharest and ITAR-TASS on 9 November, Karasin
called for "stable and predictable" bilateral relations and
regretted the "not fully satisfactory" state of economic
relations. No public mention was made by either side of a visit to
Romania by Yeltsin--a constant but unfulfilled demand of Bucharest
ever since Yeltsin became President of Russia. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL, Inc.

KOZYREV IN IRAQ. Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev arrived
in Baghdad on 9 November for high-level meetings with Iraqi
officials, including President Saddam Hussein, Russian and Western
agencies reported. The main purpose of Kozyrev's mission is to
facilitate and "formalize" Iraq's recognition of Kuwait's
international borders. Vladimir Lukin, the chairman of the State
Duma's Foreign Affairs Committee and former ambassador to the
U.S.,has stated that Kozyrev's mission may draw some fire,
particularly from the United States. For the past several weeks
Kozyrev has been encouraging Baghdad to recognize Kuwait's borders
and its sovereignty, a move that may result in an easing of
international sanctions against Iraq which were introduced in 1990
after its invasion of Kuwait. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

SOUTH AFRICAN JETS WITH MIG-29 ENGINES. Rostislav Belyakov, the
chief designer of the Mikoyan aircraft complex in Moscow, told
Interfax on 8 November that the first South African Mirage F-1
fighter equipped with a Russian-built MiG-29 engine will be
displayed at a December air show in South Africa. Belyakov said
that South Africa planned to re-equip two or three of its aircraft
with the Russian engines in a trial test. A Russian-South African
joint venture has been set up to fit the engines. Belyakov
indicated that the Russian partner was based in St. Petersburg,
which is where the Klimov Corporation--maker of the MiG-29
engines--is located. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN TO HONOR KALASHNIKOV DESIGNER ON 75TH BIRTHDAY. President
Boris Yeltsin will travel to Izhevsk in the Udmurtian Republic on
10 November to present an award to Mikhail Kalashnikov, who
designed the world-famous assault rifle that bears his name, and
who celebrates his 75th birthday that same day, Interfax and
Western agencies reported 9 November. Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev and the head of the Counter-Intelligence Service, Sergei
Stepashin, will accompany Yeltsin. On 31 October Udmurtia
Parliament Chairman Valentin Tubylov told Interfax that
Kalashnikov was being promoted to Major General for his
achievements and was to be awarded the recently introduced order
"For Special Services to the Fatherland." Kalashnikov designed the
first AK-47 in 1947. It and its successor, the AK-74, became the
most widely used and most successful of all post-World War II
small arms. They were built at the Izhmash plant in Izhevsk, and
are still produced in several other countries, including China and
Egypt. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIK ELECTION CRITICIZED. The 6 November presidential election in
Tajikistan has been criticized as neither fair nor democratic by
the human rights monitoring group Human Rights Watch, Western and
Russian agencies reported on 9 November. The report asserted that
the election was held in "an atmosphere of fear, deception, use of
power and psychological pressure" by supporters of the victor,
former parliament chairman and head of state Imomali Rakhmonov.
Human Rights Watch observers also supported charges by the losing
candidate, Abdumalik Abdullodzhonov, that media coverage was
biased in favor of Rakhmonov and the media were not accessible to
Abdullodzhonov. Although CIS election observers reported seeing
few irregularities, an article in the 9 November issue of
Nezavisimaya gazeta questions figures on the number of persons
voting in regions such as Gorno-Badakhshan, and notes that few
Tajik refugees in Moscow availed themselves of the chance to vote.
-- Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

BREAD PRICES RAISED IN ALMATY. Bread prices have been raised by an
average of 30 percent in Kazakhstan's capital, and other regions
of the country are expected to do the same, ITAR-TASS reported on
9 November. Bread prices were liberalized in Kazakhstan in
mid-October to reflect the actual cost of production and prices
rose steeply at that time; the price increase reported on 9
November is the second since prices were freed. Earlier rumors of
price increases for bread were reported to have led to
disturbances at bread shops in some areas. ITAR-TASS reported that
on this occasion expressions of discontent were limited to
complaints by bread shop customers that their living standard is
worsening. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

RUSSIAN VICE PREMIER FOR CIS AFFAIRS APPOINTED. President Boris
Yeltsin on 9 November appointed Aleksei Bolshakov to the post of
Deputy Prime Minister of Russia in charge of CIS affairs.
Bolshakov is not a political figure--a fact underscored by Yeltsin
in remarking to ITAR-TASS on 9 November that he had chosen a
technical expert for this post. Born in 1939, Bolshakov is a
graduate of St. Petersburg's Electrotechnical Institute and has
headed successively the telecommunications firms Dalnyaya Sviaz
and Vysokos korostnye Magistraly. His chief task is likely to
consist of representing Russia's interests on the recently
established Interstate Economic Committee, intended by Moscow as
an executive organ of the CIS Economic Union. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

KRAJINA SERB PLANE ATTACKS BIHAC. International media report on 10
November that a warplane flew the previous day from the Udbina
airbase against Bihac, a UN-declared "safe area" in northwest
Bosnia. It is not clear whether the Krajina Serb plane technically
violated the "no-fly" zone over Bosnia, but it fired a missile
that hit near the Una River. It is also unclear what, if anything,
the UN or NATO will do in response. Radio Bosnia and Herzegovina
said that there were ten casualties, but did not specify if this
meant dead or wounded, the VOA reported. Elsewhere in the
embattled republic, snipers wounded five civilians in Sarajevo,
while Serb forces made some gains in the Bosanska Krupa area to
the east of Bihac. Government forces were reportedly on the
advance around Gradacac and on the road to Trnovo. Meanwhile, AFP
quoted a UN spokesman as saying that non-Serbs in the Banja Luka
area face systematic discrimination, including denial of medical
attention, at "unbelievably bad" levels not seen in Europe since
World War II. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROW IN BOSNIAN SERB PARLIAMENT OVER MARTIAL LAW. The Bosnian Serb
legislature met on 9 November in Pale to discuss a proposal by
Radovan Karadzic to impose martial law, but Borba of 10 November
and Reuters report that deputies are resisting the measure.
Apparently, they not only do not like the idea of voting
themselves out of power and giving all authority to Karadzic and
the army, but also are unwilling to give up their parliamentary
immunity. One source called the clash "an insider fight almost as
tough as any on the battlefield." Karadzic said he expects the
outcome of the ongoing debate to be a compromise, which would
allow him to impose martial law in selected areas. The crisis
among the Bosnian Serbs began about two weeks ago, when Bosnian
government forces broke out of the Bihac pocket and joined up with
Croat forces to take Kupres, a town that had been about 50 percent
Serb and 40 percent Croat but was assigned to the latter in the
current peace plan for strategic reasons. The Guardian reported on
8 November that a "siege mentality" has taken hold of Karadzic and
his entourage, with purges taking place even at the highest
levels. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

WALESA EXPLAINS HIS VIEW OF LEGAL PROCESS. According to reports in
Gazeta Wyborcza and Rzeczpospolita of 10-11 November, President
Lech Walesa told a plenary meeting of Poland's Constitutional
Tribunal that "in order to construct a lawful state [in the
future] one has to accept [today] activities occurring on legal
borderlines." He added that the acceptance of such activities
"reflects the understanding of current processes" of reform.
Neither the members of the tribunal nor numerous politicians
attending the meeting appeared to have shared Walesa's views. The
Constitutional Tribunal was set up in the 1980s to interpret laws
and oversee their compatibility with the constitution. During a
recent meeting with Sejm deputies representing the Freedom Union,
a post-Solidarity group that is opposed to the current government,
Walesa admitted that he often acted on the legal borderline; the
union accused the president of "destabilizing the country." -- Jan
de Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH POLICE FOIL HEROIN SMUGGLING ATTEMPT. Gazeta Wyborcza
reported on 10-11 November that Polish police successfully
prevented an attempt to smuggle a shipment of 22.5 kilograms of
heroin from Turkey through Poland to Germany. The police estimated
the value of the heroin at about $10 million. This was the largest
ever seizure of heroin by the Polish police. The paper said that
six persons were apprehended, including a Turkish citizen. -- Jan
de Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

ANOTHER CORRUPTION AFFAIR IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC. A Ministry of
Internal Affairs spokesman announced on 9 November that police had
officially charged an unnamed person with attempting to bribe a
public official. The person, who represents a company producing
military equipment, allegedly offered a bribe to the Czech deputy
defense minister during his trip to Israel in May 1994. Although
the spokesman refused to reveal the names of those involved, CTK
points out that Czech press reports say the deputy minister in
question is Miroslav Kalousek and the person charged with
attempting to bribe him is Vera Asherova, who represents the
Singapore marketing firm Eagle Group. Asherova allegedly offered a
payment to Kalousek in exchange for supporting a bid by the
Israeli firm Elbit, which was interested in modernizing the Czech
fighter plane L-159. The press reports say Elbit is a customer of
the Eagle Group. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

KLAUS AT THE PEN CLUB'S WORLD CONGRESS. On 8 November Czech
Premier Vaclav Klaus attended the Pen Club's World Congress in
Prague to participate in a seminar titled "Intellectuals,
government policies, and tolerance." Klaus argued that dividing
intellectuals into "independent" and "dependent" [on the
government] makes sense only in undemocratic societies. In Klaus's
opinion, in democratic societies independent intellectuals should
fear only themselves--the loss of their own integrity. Klaus
disagreed with British writer Timothy Garton Ash, who argued that
intellectuals "always look for the truth, whereas politicians are
forced to work with half-truths," retorting that the only
difference between politicians and intellectuals in this respect
is that "the politician's truth can differ from that of the
intellectual." According to the prime minister, there are
politicians who know they will not be in politics for the rest of
their lives, and one of the reasons they strive for democracy and
freedom is that they want to be free when they are no longer
politicians. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK FOREIGN MINISTER ASKS KLAUS FOR EXPLANATION. Slovak Foreign
Minister Eduard Kukan asked Czech Ambassador to Slovakia Filip
Sedivy for an official explanation concerning a recent statement
by Klaus, CTK reports on 9 November. In a recent interview with
the Czech daily Lidove noviny, Klaus said that his government "is
waiting for Slovakia's new cabinet, having been basically unable
to negotiate with anyone since spring." -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL,
Inc.

KOVAC DEMANDS REVIEW OF CONTROVERSIAL DECISIONS. On 9 November
Slovak President Michal Kovac returned several controversial laws
passed by the parliament on 3 November, Reuters and CTK report.
One is the cancellation of all direct sale privatization projects
approved by the Moravcik government since 6 September, and the
other concerns an amendment to the privatization law which
transfers authority over privatization from the government to the
National Property Fund. The two laws had first been rejected by
the Moravcik government, which remains in power until a new
cabinet can be formed. The Moravcik government's request that
Kovac also reject the no-confidence votes in Privatization
Minister Milan Janicina and Interior Minister Ladislav Pittner
prompted Kovac to ask the Constitutional Court for a review of the
matter. Kovac accepted the parliament's decision to dismiss
Attorney General Vojtech Bacho, but he said he would not approve
the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia's new candidate, Ludovit
Hudek, until his credentials could be reviewed. Meeting on 9
November in the central Slovak town of Badin, the Conference of
Slovak Bishops issued a statement expressing serious concern about
the current political and social situation in Slovakia. -- Sharon
Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN-AMERICAN MILITARY COOPERATION. A meeting of the
Hungarian-American working group dealing with questions of defense
opened in Budapest on 9 November by Hungarian Defense Minister
Gyorgy Keleti, MTI reports. Keleti stressed that Hungary is
determined to join NATO. He also pointed out that only the
Hungarian air force has been supplied with the kind of detectors
that reach NATO standards. US Ambassador to Hungary Donald Blinken
called attention to the fact that Hungary's integration into the
rest of Europe is very important for the US. Blinken said that
Budapest has taken big steps toward membership in NATO and noted
that the US would provide help for improving the Hungarian defense
sector. -- Judith Pataki, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN DECISION IN BABY SMUGGLING CASE POSTPONED. On 9 November
a court of appeals postponed ruling on an appeal by a British
couple convicted of buying and trying to smuggle a baby out of
Romania, Romanian television and Reuters reported. The presiding
judge said the decision will be announced on 16 November. His
statement followed acceptance by the prosecution that the 28-month
prison sentence handed down to Adrian and Bernadette Mooney last
month was too harsh and that the sentence should be shortened and
possibly conditionally suspended. President Ion Iliescu has
already said he will grant a pardon if the appeal court fails to
overturn the sentence. -- Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIAN CENTRAL BANK REJECTS PARLIAMENT'S CRITICISM. Romanian
Central Bank Governor Mugur Isarescu defended the bank's policies
and independence against criticism expressed in a parliamentary
report. An RFE/RL correspondent in Bucharest and local media
reported that Isarescu told a joint session of the parliament's
two houses on 8 November that the bank's monetary policies have
resulted in positive trends over the past year. He cited a reduced
inflation rate, strong commercial banks and a revived confidence
in the national currency. Isarescu said general economic success
cannot be achieved unless bold monetary policies are followed by
independence of the banking system and rapid privatization of
state-owned companies. The shortcomings cited in the parliamentary
report, Isarescu said, are the result of delays in the
transformation of the economy. The report said the Central Bank
has manipulated financial policies for its own benefit and has
neglected more general economic interests. However, President Ion
Iliescu said on 8 November that attacks on the bank are
ungrounded, while Premier Nicolae Vacaroiu asked the ruling
party's parliamentarians (who are in majority on the commission
that issued the report) to support Isarescu. -- Michael Shafir,
RFE/RL, Inc.

BULGARIAN BOOK BAN SOUGHT. The Simon Wiesenthal Centre urged
Bulgaria on 9 November to ban a recently published book blaming
Jews for the deaths of three Russian Tsars and the advent of
Communism. Shimon Samuels, the Centre's European director, said in
a letter to President Zhelyu Zhelev that Bulgaria's reputation was
violated by the book "Masons, Jews, and Revolutions: How these
Forces of Satan are Preparing the End of Mankind." Samuels said
the book was a "rehash of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion," a
19th century forgery used by Tsarist Russia to justify anti-Jewish
pogroms. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALBANIAN GOVERNING PARTY REFUSES TO CONCEDE OVER REFERENDUM. The
Democratic Party issued a statement denying defeat in the 6
November referendum on a new constitution, Reuters reported on 9
November. President Sali Berisha had linked his fortunes to the
vote but on 7 November stated that the document "did not find the
approval of the people." This followed unofficial reports that
over 60 percent had voted "no." Now, however, his party says that
"so far, only one thing is certain: the figures reported by some
newspapers are extremely exaggerated and unrealistic." The vote
was marred by some irregularities and unexplained acts of
violence, but foreign observers said that the referendum was
generally "free and fair." Elsewhere, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported from Washington that the International Development
Association, which is associated with the World Bank, has granted
Albania a $12.4 million credit to improve health care. -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FEDERALISM IN MOLDOVA. Cosponsored by
the Helsinki Citizens' Assembly and the CSCE mission in Moldova,
an international conference on "Decentralization, Autonomy,
Federalism: A Basis for National Conciliation and Security" was
held in Chisinau on 7 and 8 November. Experts from Western and
Eastern Europe discussed the experiences of Italy's South Tyrol
region, Spain's Valencia and Catalan provinces, Finland within the
former Russian empire, and other European cases and their
potential applicability to Moldova's state organization. Senior
"Dniester" and Gagauz political figures attended. Chisinau
officials presented Moldova's offers of far-reaching regional
autonomy to Transdniester and the Gagauz. The former, based on the
CSCE mission's 1993 recommendations, has thus far been rejected by
Tiraspol. The latter, worked out by Chisinau with the Gagauz
leaders and cleared by the Moldovan parliament in the first
reading in August, has been criticized in some West European
forums and by some experts at this conference for going too far in
setting a potential precedent for ethnic-territorial autonomy. --
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

BELARUSIAN ECONOMIC NEWS. On 8 November the Russian ruble
officially stopped circulating as a legal tender in Belarus,
Interfax reported. That same day the Belarusian parliament
rejected a proposal by National Bank of Belarus Chairman Stanislau
Bahdankevich that the bank independently decide the amount of
money and credit to be issued. The parliament decided
monetary-credit policy must be debated and approved by the
parliament. Bahdankevich has advocated slashing credits and a much
more stringent monetary policy than the parliament, which has so
far granted large credits to the industrial and agricultural
sectors. On 9 November Interfax reported that the Belarusian
government has given the IMF a memorandum on its economic policy
for 1995. The IMF will examine the memorandum and decide whether
Belarus should be granted the first part of the Stand-by reserve
credit, amounting to $160 million. In other news, on 7 November
Belarus signed an economic cooperation agreement with Denmark. --
Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

NPT DEBATE IN UKRAINE. On 9 November Ukrainian radio reported that
the Ukrainian parliament has scheduled the debate on joining the
Non-Proliferation Treaty for 15-18 November. This comes right
before President Leonid Kuchma's scheduled 19 November visit to
the US. One of the stumbling blocs to Ukraine's joining the NPT
has been the issue of security guarantees from other nuclear
powers. In recent weeks, however, other nuclear states have said
they were prepared to extend such guarantees after Ukraine joins
the NPT. Kuchma has repeatedly criticized the linkage of economic
aid to Ukraine with the country's joining NPT, and he said this
issue should have no bearing on his upcoming visit to the US,
ITAR-TASS reported. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION CELEBRATIONS IN UKRAINE. On 7 November, the
77th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution, left-wing groups
held demonstrations in Kiev, Odessa, Simfereopol, and other cities
to commemorate the event, Ukrainian radio reported. The turnout
was largest in Kiev, where several thousand participated in the
demonstrations. Nationalists held a counter-demonstration and
clashed with police when they tried to disrupt the communist
rally. Some injuries were reported. In Lviv, a nationalist center,
a restaurant which was believed to be frequented by leftists was
vandalized by nationalists. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

SOVIET VETERANS IN RIGA MARK BOLSHEVIK REVOLUTION. About 100
Soviet war veterans and pensioners gathered on 7 November in
Riga's Vermane park to commemorate the anniversary of the
Bolshevik uprising in Russia. They complained that the Soviet
holiday is not observed in Latvia and that the press and the
left-wing political organizations did not remind people to mark
this important date in history. Many of the participants had red
ribbons on their coats and some also held the red flags of the
USSR and the Latvian SSR, BNS reported. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL,
Inc.

SLOW PROGRESS IN LITHUANIAN-BELARUSIAN BORDER TALKS. On 8 November
in Vilnius Lithuanian Deputy Foreign Minister Rimantas Sidlauskas
and his Belarusian counterpart Stanislau Ahurtsau determined the
border at the confluence of the Kleva and Gauja Rivers and decided
that the Lithuanian Pagiriai enclave would be exchanged for some
Belarusian territory, Radio Lithuania reported on 9 November.
During a meeting on 13 October, the fate of the Adutiskis railroad
station was settled; however, the follow-up meeting was postponed
several times. The next round of talks is scheduled for 24
November in Minsk. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH LINK TO LITHUANIAN BOMB? On 8 November an anonymous caller
telephoned the newspaper Respublika saying in Polish that the
Polish National Liberation Movement took full responsibility for
the recent railroad bridge bombing. A similar call in Russian was
received by Lietuvos rytas the following day. Zbigniew Semenowicz,
the leader of the Polish faction in the Seimas said he did not
know of such an organization, and if it did exist, it would have
been created by the KGB, BNS reported on 9 November. A high
Security Department official said that it was "hardly likely" that
the blast had been set by a mysterious Polish organization, for
"Poles have no reason to make noise." The Lithuanian government
that day offered a reward of 250,000 litas ($62,500) for
information leading to the disclosure of the organizers and
perpetrators of the bombing. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Sharon Fisher and Pete Baumgartner)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
Inquiries about specific news items should be directed as
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Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


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