If a man be gracious and courteous to strangers, it shows he is a citizen of the world, and that his heart is no island cut off from other lands, but a continent that joins to them. - Francis Bacon
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 211, 7 November 1994

                              RUSSIA

YELTSIN APPOINTS CHUBAIS AND PANSKOV TO KEY ECONOMIC POSTS.
Russian President Boris Yeltsin named radical reformer Anatoly
Chubais as first deputy Prime Minister, agencies reported on 5
November. Chubais will be responsible for several economic
agencies, including the ministries of economics, finance and
foreign trade. On 6 November Chubais told Russian television that
his main goal will be the adoption and implementation of the
austerity budget proposed by Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin.
Chubais' promotion was preceded by that of Vladimir Panskov to the
post of minister of finance. Panskov, an old-school Soviet
bureaucrat, served as first deputy to the Soviet minister of
finance, Valentin Pavlov, from 1987 to 1990. In February 1993
Panskov was arrested on charges of bribe-taking, but was later
released by the prosecution. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

DUMA ADOPTS CONTROVERSIAL BUDGET LEGISLATION. ITAR-TASS reported
on 6 November that President Yeltsin has signed legislation
linking the adoption of the state budget in the Duma with the
resignation of the government. According to the legislation, if
the Duma rejects the budget proposed by the prime minister, the
resignation of the government is to follow. Earlier, Yeltsin
vetoed the legislation, but the Duma, resorting to Constitutional
provisions, has managed to overrule the president by a two-thirds
vote. Yeltsin, however, in a letter dispatched to the Duma, has
said that he would not consider or care to accept the resignation
of the Chernomyrdin government. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

SHOKHIN RESIGNS. On 5 November Russian television reported that
President Yeltsin had accepted the resignation of Economics
Minister Aleksander Shokhin. Shokhin said he resigned bec ause he
was not consulted prior to the appointment of the new finance
minister, Vladimir Panskov. Two of Yeltsin's top economic
advisers, Aleksandr Lifshits and Yakov Urinson, are touted as
possible successors to Shokhin. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

SECOND DUMA DEPUTY KILLED THIS YEAR. ITAR-TASS reported on 6
November that communist state Duma deputy Valetin Martemyanov died
from a severe beating by unknown thugs. Martemyanov was attacked
and robbed near his house on 1 November. State Duma Chairman Ivan
Rybkin and Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin expressed their
condolences to Martemyanov's family and to the communist faction
in the Duma. In April, Andrei Aizderdsis, deputy from the Duma
faction New Regional Policy, was killed near his house. -- Victor
Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

SIGNS OF A TENTATIVE RUSSIAN-TURKISH RAPPROCHEMENT? Meeting in
Moscow on 4 November with Turkey's first deputy foreign minister,
Ozdem Sanberk, Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev endorsed
Turkish Prime Minister Tansu Ciller's call for closer
Russian-Turkish cooperation in the interests of reducing mutual
misunderstanding and of strengthening stability in the Middle
East, ITAR-TASS reported. In a joint statement released after
Sanberk's talks with Russian first deputy foreign minister Igor
Ivanov, also on 4 November, the two sides called for "an adequate
response" by the UN Security Council to Iraq's "constructive
cooperation" with the UN Security Council Special Commission and
suggested that this could pave the way for lifting the embargo
against Baghdad, Interfax reported. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

PAPERS LASH U.S. OVER SUBMARINE INCIDENT. On 5 November two
Russian dailies criticized the United States over the incident
three days earlier when what the Russians claim was an American
submarine was discovered off the Kola inlet. After praising the
skill of the crew of the Russian diesel-powered submarine that
found the intruder, the military paper Krasnaya zvezda claimed
that the Americans had been intruding Russian waters with impunity
while Russian submarines had avoided areas where America had
interests, because "partners must be respected." It then appealed
for a higher defense budget to better protect all Russians "from
uninvited guests from underwater." Rossiyskaya gazeta likewise
said that it had become a bad tradition for foreign submarines to
encroach on Russia's waters, and warned that the Russian Navy,
despite its current difficulties, "remains a fierce threat, and
any provocation against it is liable to result in simply
unpredictable consequences." -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN COMPANY OFFERS ANTI-STEALTH RADAR. The British defense
journal Despatches on 2 November reported that a Russian company,
Nitel, was selling two air defense radar systems supposedly able
to detect stealth aircraft. The systems work in the Very High
Frequency (VHF) band, a radar technology largely abandoned in the
West after World War II as higher frequencies became available.
Russian scientists, however, continued to experiment with VHF
radar. The report said Syria and India would be the likely buyers.
-- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

KEELER ADMITS BEING A SOVIET SPY. Christine Keeler, the call-girl
who brought about the disgrace of a senior British minister in
1963, has admitted to being a Soviet spy. Keeler, then nineteen,
was having an affair with War Minister John Profumo at the same
time she was involved with a Soviet naval attache. Profumo was
forced to resign after was found to have lied to parliament about
his relationship with Keeler, but Keeler always denied she was a
spy. In the issue of the British celebrity magazine OK published
on 4 November, Keeler admits that she and a friend were
"delivering stuff to the Russian embassy, but I really didn't know
what I was doing." -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

EXPLOSIONS, INTIMIDATION ON EVE OF TAJIK ELECTIONS. Security
measures were intensified on 5 November after four bombs exploded
in Dushanbe the previous day, injuring two people, Russian and
Western agencies reported. The Tajik opposition disclaimed
responsibility. Tajik ambassador to Russia Abdumalik
Abdullodzhanov, alternative presidential candidate to Prime
Minister Imomali Rakhmonov, was detained for several hours at
Dushanbe airport on 4 November, according to Interfax. The
exchange of 27 political prisoners held by the Tajik government
for 27 prisoners of war held by the opposition, on which an
extension of the existing cease-fire for a further three months is
contingent, failed to take place as scheduled on 5 November as no
opposition representatives showed up, AFP reported on 6 November.
The Russian Foreign Ministry promptly issued a statement, carried
by ITAR-TASS on 6 November, condemning the opposition's "clear and
flagrant violation" of the agreements signed in Islamabad on 1
November. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

RAKHMONOV ELECTED PRESIDENT. Despite the opposition boycott, some
90 percent of the Tajik electorate participated in the 6 November
presidential election and referendum on a new constitution,
Russian and Western agencies reported. Quoting preliminary
results, ITAR-TASS reported on 7 November that Prime Minister
Imomali Rakhmonov had received some 60 percent of the votes. There
were no violent incidents; while Rakhmonov described the poll as
"the most democratic of elections," a spokesman for Abdullodzhanov
told AFP that "there have been so many examples of the rules being
broken that we have stopped logging them." -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL,
Inc.

RUSSIA AND THE CASPIAN. Russia, Iran and Turkmenistan are
currently considering a trilateral agreement on development of oil
deposits on the Turkmen section of the Caspian shelf, an
unidentified Russian diplomat told Interfax on 4 November. He
assessed the prospects for joint exploitation of these deposits as
good, provided the extent of Turkmenistan's section of the Caspian
shelf is clarified. He further argued that it was unacceptable for
any country to penetrate almost to the middle of the Caspian and
begin to develop mineral resources there with the participation of
third countries that have no connection with the Caspian -- a
clear reference to Azerbaijan's recently concluded agreement to
exploit three oil fields several hundred Km offshore jointly with
a Western consortium. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

YELTSIN DECREE ON RESCUING RUSSIANS ABROAD. President Boris
Yeltsin has issued a decree on "defending the interests of the
Russian Federation and of Russian citizens abroad in emergency
situations," ITAR-TASS reported on 3 November. The decree empowers
the president to order the evacuation of those citizens and to
"assign the forces and means to effect that evacuation." As
summarized by the agency, the types of emergency situations listed
in the decree include "a threat of aggression against the Russian
Federation," "an armed attack on the country of residence [of
Russian citizens]," "the participation of the country of residence
in armed conflicts," "the conduct of military actions in countries
adjacent to the country of residence," and further, unspecified
types of emergencies. The decree is likely to be viewed with
misgivings in "near abroad" countries as a potential license for
intervention owing to its sweeping and unilateral definition of
emergency situations. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

SUPRANATIONAL POWERS FOR INTER-PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY SOUGHT. In
remarks carried by CIS TV and Radio and by Radio Russia's
"Neighbors" program on 5 and 6 November, CIS Interparliamentary
Assembly (IPA) Chairman Vladimir Shumeiko, who is also chairman of
the Russian Federation Council, urged that IPA issue "model laws"
to serve as a basis for the legislation of CIS member states and
thus to promote those states' legislative integration. While
conceding that the "model laws" may be adopted with some
variations to reflect the states' "specific features," Shumeiko
offered laws or draft laws prepared by the Russian parliament or
by his IPA staff as "models". He called for the early adoption by
the CIS states of a "model" civil code, a law on
financial-industrial groups, a law on local administration, a
charter on social rights and guarantees, and a legislative basis
to the CIS Economic Union. Shumeiko predicted that economic and
legislative integration will in the next stage lead to political
integration. "The former Soviet republics will not reunite today,
but they are searching for all available methods to unite," he
added. He also credited the CIS with "saving the Union from total
collapse." IPA's statute gives it no legislative powers, but
issuing "model laws" for adoption by CIS states would be a way to
circumvent that limitation and effectively create a supranational
legislative authority. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

TOWARD A SOCIALIST INTERNATIONAL? At a meeting in Kiev reported by
the Ukrainian news agency UNIAN on 1 November, delegates of
socialist parties from Russia, Ukraine, Moldova, Georgia, and
Kazakhstan called for the holding next May of the founding
congress of the "Eurasian Socialist International" for the purpose
of "coordinating the activities of parties of socialist
orientation." The parties would seek to establish "a democratic
society with social justice and social protection, individual
freedom with social responsibility and state regulation of all
areas of social life," and interstate cooperation within a
collective security system. The initiative does not appear
confined to CIS states, as socialist party delegates from Romania
and Serbia attended, and Greece's PASOK and the French communist
party expressed willingness to cooperate. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

MUSLIMS CLAIM BIG GAINS NEAR SARAJEVO. International media report
on 7 November that Bosnian government forces say they have taken
some 60 square kilometers north of Sarajevo in the Nisic area. UN
observers maintain those claims are probably overstated, and it is
not clear to what extent Serb assertions that they have retaken
some land near Bihac are valid, either. What does seem clear is
that the Bosnian government's new tactic of hitting the Serbs hard
on a broad front is having an effect. The approach maximizes the
Muslims' advantages in manpower and minimizes the Serbs' strength
in heavy artillery and tanks. When Croat guns and armor are added
to the Muslims' numbers, the combination has proven particularly
decisive, as at Kupres on 3 November. Meanwhile, the government
forces are continuing their offensive on a series of fronts. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

GENERAL ROSE WARNS ABOUT SARAJEVO CEASE-FIRE. CNN said on 7
November that the UN commander in Bosnia, British General Sir
Michael Rose, has met with Bosnian Vice President Ejup Ganic to
discuss violations of the cease-fire in the Sarajevo area. The two
men agreed to joint patrols of the demilitarized zone. It is not
clear whether the Serbs will talk to Rose, although their retaking
of some of their heavy weapons under UN control in response to a
government mortar attack helped spark Rose's latest concern. On 6
November NATO jets buzzed the capital in a warning against
continued violations of the truce by both sides. Meanwhile in
Geneva, UN human rights envoy Tadeusz Mazowiecki on 4 November
again singled out Bosnian Serbs and their ethnic cleansing
campaigns as the worst violators of human rights in the conflict.
On 1 November, however, The New York Times ran a commentary that
recalled "the forgotten Serbs" of Bosnia, namely those throughout
the republic and in exile in Serbia and elsewhere who still
believe in a multi-ethnic Bosnia and Herzegovina. -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUMP YUGOSLAV FOREIGN MINISTER VISITS CROATIA. International and
Croatian media reported on 4 November that Vladislav Jovanovic
flew from Belgrade to Zagreb for talks with his Croat counterpart,
Mate Granic. No major breakthrough was reported in the first such
publicly reported meeting in four years. The two sides agreed to
continue discussions about priorities in establishing relations.
Croatia insists that Serbia-Montenegro recognize it in its
internationally accepted borders as a first step. -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

GENERAL MOTORS OPENS CAR PLANT IN WARSAW. On 5 November General
Motors began to assemble Opel Astra cars in Warsaw in a joint
venture with Fabryka Samochodow Osobowych, the Polish state-owned
carmaker. The new company, GM Poland, will produce 10,000 cars
annually, at a retail price of about $13,300. General Motors,
which already has production plants in Hungary and eastern
Germany, said it would commit about $85 million to the Polish
project. According to Polish press reports, Premier Waldemar
Pawlak was present when the first Astra left the assembly line. --
Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

SPANISH FOREIGN MINISTER IN WARSAW. Spanish Foreign Minister
Javier Solana Madariaga said on 4 November in Warsaw that his
country supports Polish efforts to join both the European Union
and NATO. Rzeczpospolita quoted him on 5 November as saying that
"It would be difficult to imagine Europe without such an important
country as Poland." Spain has been reportedly concerned about the
prospect of EU membership for Central European countries since
this might affect its economic interests and relations with its
southern Arab neighbors. In a related development, Pawlak is
expected to raise the issue of Poland's entry into the EU in his
talks with British Premier John Major during his visit to London
on 7 November. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECH PRIVATIZATION PROGRAM AFTER CORRUPTION SCANDAL. Vladimir
Rudlovcak, who was named acting head of the Czech Center for
Coupon Privatization following the arrest on corruption charges of
his predecessor, Jaroslav Lizner, said on 3 November there is no
need to change the coupon privatization program. Reuter reports
Rudlovcak as saying that "it is not fully clear what happened with
Mr. Lizner," who has been charged with accepting a payment to
ensure the awarding of shares. Rudlovcak claimed that "our capital
markets and continuation of privatization do not rest on one
person." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECH-GERMAN MILITARY MANEUVERS. A total of about 400 troops are
participating in the first joint military exercises between the
Czech Republic and Germany, which began on 7 November. The
maneuvers are designed as a practice of United Nations-sponsored
peace-keeping operations. CTK reports that a joint staff has been
set up for the exercises in Western Bohemia, but no armed soldiers
will cross the border. The Czechs and Germans will each use about
50 transport and back-up vehicles. Czech Defense Minister Vilem
Holan and German Defense Minister Volker Ruehe are to review the
exercises on 8 November. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

PARTY OF THE DEMOCRATIC LEFT ENDS TALKS WITH MECIAR. Meeting on 5
November the executive committee of the PDL decided to break off
coalition talks with designated Premier Vladimir Meciar's party,
the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia. The move is a result of
the MDS's behavior during the first two sessions of the
parliament, when the party and its allies made a series of
politically-motivated personnel changes in the parliament and
other important bodies. PDL officials noted that the MDS's actions
had restored unity within their party; several PDL members had
previously expressed willingness to cooperate with the MDS.
Meanwhile, President Michal Kovac released a statement on 4
November saying that the parliament's second session signaled a
move away political and civic reconciliation. He stressed that the
legality of the steps taken by the parliament would have to be
investigated. That same day, the MDS said that casting doubt on
decisions made by the parliament indicates a totalitarian way of
thinking. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

MORAVCIK APPEALS TO MECIAR TO FORM CABINET QUICKLY. Appearing on
Slovak TV on 6 November, outgoing Premier Jozef Moravcik
encouraged Meciar "to stop playing blind man's bluff, emerge from
the shadow and reveal his long-prepared and publicized shadow
cabinet." He said it is "absurd and politically irresponsible" for
Meciar to continue to delay the formation of the government even
though he has shown he has strong support in the parliament.
Meanwhile, Moravcik stressed that his own government, which
resigned on 3 November but remains in office until a new cabinet
can be formed, cannot function in the present circumstances.
Meciar said coalition negotiations would start up again on 7
November, but all partners have been eliminated except for the
extreme nationalist Slovak National Party and the radical
left-wing Association of Slovak Workers. ASW Chairman Jan Luptak
said on Slovak Radio on 5 November that his party had concluded a
secret coalition agreement with the MDS but that it would not be
represented in the new government. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

ILIESCU IN BRUSSELS. Following a working visit to the United
Kingdom, Romanian President Ion Iliescu arrived in Brussels on 4
November. That same day he held talks concerning bilateral
economic and political relations with Belgian Premier Jean-Luc
Dehaene, Romanian television reported. Iliescu requested "the
intensification of Belgian investments" in Romania and growing
Belgian involvement in "supporting the process of transition and
modernization" of the Romanian economy. Also on 4 November,
Iliescu held talks with NATO Secretary-General Willy Claes. On 5
November Romanian Television quoted Iliescu as saying Romania
considered the "Partnership for Peace" program as being "a stage
on the road to achieving its major strategic objective, namely
becoming a full member of NATO." International media quoted Claes
as saying that he and Iliescu had discussed strengthening
relations, but not specifically Romania's wish to join the
alliance. Claes said that thus far NATO members have not discussed
which former Communist countries can join and when, but such
discussions should begin soon. He also said NATO did not want to
isolate Russia but that it was not prepared to accept guidance
from Moscow on how the alliance should develop. Iliescu returned
to Bucharest on 5 November. -- Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

NATIONAL-COMMUNISTS ABOUT TO JOIN ROMANIAN GOVERNMENT? Romania's
main government party, the Party of Social Democracy of Romania
has signed an agreement on coordinating policies with the
Socialist Labor Party and extreme-nationalist Greater Romania
Party. The junior party in the coalition government, the extremist
Party of Romanian National Unity, has also signed the agreement.
The decision was announced at an extraordinary meeting of the GRP
National Council. The council met on 5 and 6 November to decide
whether to continue to support the Vacaroiu government in the
parliament, allegedly over failures to improve living standards.
The move appears to have been geared at forcing the PSDR to accept
the GRP as a full partner in the coalition. The council decided to
continue backing the government over the next three months, after
which it will review the decision again. -- Michael Shafir,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ROMANIA SEEKS TO MODERNIZE ITS AIR FORCE. The Romanian military is
planning to modernize its current warplanes using Israeli
technology, as well as to buy some new planes. The RFE/RL
correspondent in Bucharest quoted on 3 November Defense Ministry
spokeswoman Elena Olariu, who told a press conference that
preliminary talks about the new planes were underway with British
and French suppliers. The Romanian airforce is made up of Soviet
planes. At the press conference, Olariu blamed the series of
crashes of Soviet-built warplanes (nine Mig-21s have crashed this
year) on a lack of funding. She said this had forced a cutback in
the number of military flight instructions, which meant Romanian
pilots did not get enough training. She also said most of the
country's warplanes and facilities were old and ill-equipped. --
Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

"THE GREATEST DAY IN THE HISTORY OF ALBANIA." This is how
President Sali Berisha described the 6 November referendum on
Albania's new constitution, the VOA said. Some incidents of
violence were reported, and the opposition Socialists claimed
irregularities. The turnout was in any event heavy, and Berisha's
referendum is expected to be a success, news agencies report.
Approval of the first postcommunist constitution is expected to
pave the way for admission to the Council of Europe, which in turn
is seen as crucial for attracting new foreign investment. On 4
November Berisha addressed a huge pro-constitution rally in
Tirana, where Kosovar shadow state President Ibrahim Rugova
praised the document, calling it "a democratic one that will
realize the integration of Albanians." Berisha added that "this
constitution will protect the national and human rights of the
Albanians wherever they are." -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN-HUNGARIAN CORDIAL ENTENTE. Received by Moldovan President
Mircea Snegur on 3 November, Hungarian Foreign Ministry State
Secretary Istvan Szent-Ivanyi said "Hungary disagrees with those
who question Moldova's right to independence and who seek to join
Moldova to another country." Moldova has recently issued a series
of vehement protests against Romanian irredentist aspirations.
Snegur expressed gratitude for Hungary's support for Moldova's
integration in European institutions. Szent-Ivanyi pledged
continued support and criticized the "Dniester" authorities'
pressures on Moldovan schools, Interfax, ITAR-TASS, and Basapress
reported. Former Hungarian Foreign Minister Geza Jeszenszki, who
had praised Moldova's treatment of ethnic minorities, currently
serves as the Council of Europe's rapporteur on the matter of
Moldova's admission. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN-IRANIAN OIL DEAL. Returning on 3 November from a visit to
Iran, Moldovan Premier Andrei Sangheli announced the signing of an
agreement of intent to import 2.5 million tons of crude oil
annually from that country between 1995 and 1999. The oil is to be
sold by Iran at 10% below world market prices and repaid with
Moldovan agricultural products and various types of pumps. The oil
is to be delivered to Constanta, Romania and refined in that
country, Moldovan and Russian agencies reported. Moldova has been
seeking to diversify its fuel supply sources in order to reduce
dependence on Russia. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

TURKMENISTAN TO DEFER UKRAINIAN DEBT. On 4 November Ukrainian
President Leonid Kuchma arrived in Ashkhabat for negotiations with
Turkmen President Saparmurad Niyazov, various agencies reported.
During the talks Niyazov agreed to defer Ukraine's gas debt, which
reportedly totals between $700 million and over $1 billion. The
debt will be formalized into a loan and repaid over 7 years,
partly with credits to be provided by the IMF and G-7, and partly
by supplying Turkmenistan with goods. The session was also
attended by the US coordinator for CIS Affairs, James Collins. It
was reported that US President Bill Clinton had written a letter
to Niyazov urging him to show generosity and defer Ukraine's debt
payment as this would be necessary to sustain Kiev's economic
reforms. Despite the agreement on deferring the debt, the two
sides failed to agree on gas supplies for 1995. -- Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

DEPUTIES CONDEMN KUCHMA'S ECONOMIC POLICY. Ukraine's parliament
met in a special session on 4 November to discuss Kuchma's
economic policies, Reuters reported. During the session, leftists
deputies attacked last week's price liberalization. The
parliamentary speaker and head of the Socialist Party, Oleksander
Moroz, said he had the constitutional right to cancel executive
decisions which contravened the country's laws and that he would
not hesitate to do so. The debate was cut off after an hour and
will resume on 9 November. This marks the first serious criticism
of the new president by deputies and indicates that Kuchma's
honeymoon period with parliament may be drawing to a close. --
Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

CRIMEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE CONSTITUTION. Despite the 1 November
deadline set by Kiev, Crimea's parliament has still not made any
progress on bringing the Crimean constitution in line with
Ukraine's. On 4 November Interfax reported that the Crimean
parliament could not open its session because not enough deputies
had registered. Deputies then adjourned for in-faction discussions
on the issue of lifting the moratorium on a Crimean referendum on
independence. Later that day the parliament still could not begin
its session because deputies continued to refuse to register. On 6
November Interfax reported that the Russia and Russia Unity
factions said that a referendum should be held on the need to
bring Crimea's legislation in line with Ukraine's. Kievskie
vedomosti reported on 4 November that Crimean Deputy Premier
Andrii Senchenko warned that Crimea risked losing all of its
autonomy if it continued antagonizing Kiev. -- Ustina Markus,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ESTONIA AND THE EU. On 3 and 4 November more than 130 participants
from 15 countries attended the conference "Estonia and the
European Union" in Tallinn, BNS reports. Former Premier Mart Laar
said Estonia's aim was to join the EU by the year 2000 together
with the Visegrad countries. Jaime Cavanillas y Junquera, the head
of the European Commission delegation, named stability and
economic development as the greatest concerns in the Baltic region
and stressed the need for a liberal trade policy. Working groups
pointed out that Estonia's social insurance system had to be
developed further, that new laws on intellectual property,
consumer protection, customs, and competition had to be passed to
be in line with EU legal requirements. The next conference on the
same subject will be held in the spring. -- Saulius Girnius,
RFE/RL, Inc.

LATVIAN DEPUTY ACQUITTED OF KGB CHARGES. On 4 November a Riga
district court acquitted Latvian Saeima deputy Edvins Inkens of
charges of cooperation with the KGB, Diena reported. During the
trial, KGB agent Peteris Locmelis confessed that he had reported
to his superiors to have recruited Inkens to gather information
for the KGB and had also fabricated a file about Inkens. He did
not tell his superiors that all this had been done without the
knowledge or acquiescence of Inkens. Locmelis failed to provide
this information in the pre-trial investigation. With the court
ruling, Inkens can resume his duties as a parliamentary deputy.
The cases of three other deputies are still being considered by
Latvian courts. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Sharon Fisher and Stan Markotich)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
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Inquiries about specific news items should be directed as
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RFE/RL, Inc.
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Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


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