It matters if you don't just give up. - Stephen Hawking
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 208, 2 November 1994

                              RUSSIA

YELTSIN DISMISSES GENERAL BURLAKOV. President Boris Yeltsin has
fired First Deputy Defense Minister Matvei Burlakov in order "to
protect the honor of the armed forces, their senior commanders,
the authority of the state power and in connection with current
investigations," agencies reported 1 November. Burlakov, the
former commander of Russian troops in Germany and Hungary, had
repeatedly been charged with corruption in connection with his
administration of the pullout from Germany. ITAR-TASS said that a
government report indicated losses of $6.7 million as a result of
corruption among troops in Germany. Major General Yuri Erin, the
former military prosecutor in the Western Group of Forces (WGF),
said on Russian Television that several officers have been
arrested for corruption but he denied finding any organized
corruption among WGF's top officers. Radical mass media has also
linked Burlakov and Defense Minister Pavel Grachev with the death
of investigative reporter Dmitrii Kholodov, who frequently wrote
about corruption within the army and was killed by a bomb blast
last month. Before dismissing Burlakov, Yeltsin discussed the
situation with Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin, Russian
Television reported. Yeltsin expressed his concern to Chernomyrdin
for both the continuous media criticism of the armed forces and
the army's steep budget demands, which could jeopardize the
austere state budget proposed last week by Chernomyrdin. Finally,
Yeltsin reportedly told Chernomyrdin to make finding housing for
military personnel a top priority . -- Victor Yasmann and Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN ORDERS HIS ADMINISTRATIVE STAFFCUT BY ONE-THIRD. President
Boris Yeltsin has given orders to reduce his administration and to
transfer part of its function to the Russian government, Ostankino
Television reported 1 November. The growth of the state
bureaucracy is a permanent theme in the Russian mass media. It was
also one of the topics of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's address to the
State Duma last week. According to former Minister of Finances
Boris Fedorov, the total personnel of Yeltsin's presidential
administration in Moscow and other regions has reached 40,000.
This is several times higher than the staff of the Central
Committee of the CPSU in the Soviet period. -- Victor Yasmann,
RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN OFFICIAL CALLS FOR ACTION AGAINST BOSNIAN MUSLIMS.
Interfax reported on 1 November that Russian Foreign Ministry
spokesman Grigori Karasin said Russia believes the UN should take
action against Bosnia's Muslims. According to Karasin, recent
Bosnian government attacks against Serb-held positions in
UN-declared safety areas shows the Bosnian government's "open
disregard" for the UN Security Council's stance on Bosnia. Karasin
also said that "the entire range of means available" ought to be
employed against the Muslim-led authorities and that Russia's
representative to the UN Security Council will communicate
Moscow's concerns and position to that body. -- Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SERGEI MAVRODI IS ELECTED TO DUMA. The controversial entrepreneur
Sergei Mavrodi, who masterminded a colossal pyramid scheme, was
elected to Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma,
agencies reported on 31 October. Mavrodi, who got 27 percent of
the votes, was far ahead of the other candidates such as local
administration chief Aleksandr Zharov (14 percent) and the leader
of the Party of Economic Freedom, Konstantin Borovoy (13 percent).
Despite the fears of the democratic mass media, Aleksandr Fedorov,
the candidate of the fascist Russian National Unity, won only six
percent of the votes, placing seventh in the election. Immediately
after his election, Mavrodi announced the offices of his
investment fund MMM will be closed until 1 January and that all
present shares issued by the fund are invalid. He also said that
after his election to the Duma he is suspending his duties as
president and chief executive officer of MMM. Mavrodi's statements
provoked an angry demonstration in Moscow by several thousand MMM
investors, who called him "a liar." Moscow City Prosecutor
Gennadii Ponomarev said he is not closing the case on Mavrodi, who
is accused of fraud and tax evasion. Ponomarev added, however,
that continuing the legal proceedings against Mavrodi will be very
difficult because of the limited immunity he now enjoys as a Duma
deputy. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN NAVY FLYERS CAN USE UKRAINIAN BASE. Admiral Valentyn
Selivanov, chief of the Russian Naval Staff, told foreign military
and naval attaches on 28 October that agreement had been reached
with Ukraine to allow the Russian navy to use the complex at Saki
in the Crimea to train carrier pilots. Saki was the Soviet navy's
only land-based facility for training carrier pilots, and features
a simulated carrier deck complete with shipboard aircraft
launching and recovery equipment. According to Interfax, Selivanov
also told the attaches that the reorganization of the Baltic Fleet
following the Russian withdrawal from the Baltic republics had
been completed. Part of the fleet's submarines and mine-sweepers
are now based at the Leningrad naval base while the rest of the
fleet has moved to Baltiisk, in Kaliningrad oblast. -- Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

DUMA SAYS FOREIGNERS MUST TAKE AIDS TESTS. The lower house of the
Russian parliament voted 247-1 with 1 abstention on 28 October to
make HIV tests obligatory for all foreigners visiting Russia,
Reuters reported. The measure still has to be passed by the
Federation Council and signed by President Yeltsin. Official
figures released in May said 105 people in Russia had died of AIDS
since 1987 and a further 740 were HIV-positive. -- Penny Morvant,
RFE/RL, Inc.

DUMA COMMITTEE WANTS SEPARATE NAVY BUDGET. The Chairman of the
State Duma's Geopolitics Committee said on 28 October that the
Duma should pass a special budget bill for the Navy and develop
and endorse a government-controlled shipbuilding program. Viktor
Ustinov, a member of Vladimir Zhirinovsky's Liberal Democratic
Party, was quoted by Interfax as saying that the Navy was supposed
to get 9.5 trillion rubles from the 1994 defense budget but as of
20 October had received only 3.4 trillion. Another Duma member,
Konstantin Panferov, said he felt 22 trillion rubles should be
spent to rebuild the Navy. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIK CEASEFIRE EXTENDED. The third round of UN-sponsored talks
between the Tajik government and opposition ended in Islamabad on
1 November with an agreement to prolong for three months (i.e.
until 6 February) the ceasefire on the Afghan-Tajik border and
within Tajikistan, ITAR-TASS and Interfax reported. In return, the
Tajik government has agreed to the release of 27 political
prisoners. The next round of talks is to take place in Moscow next
month. Meanwhile the campaign committee of presidential candidate
Abdumalik Abdullodzhanov has addressed an appeal to the UN
Secretary-General and the presidents of Russia, the US and
Uzbekistan protesting intimidation of his supporters by Parliament
speaker Emomali Rakhmonov. They argue that the intimidation could
lead to a new spiral of civil war. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

BOUTROS-GHALI IN BAKU . . . Addressing Azerbaijan's rump
parliament on 31 October, UN Secretary-General Boutros
Boutros-Ghali promised concrete assistance in expediting the
building of a democratic society, and specifically in the conduct
of the parliamentary elections scheduled for July, 1995. He again
affirmed support for Azerbaijan's territorial integrity and for
the CSCE peace plan for Nagorno-Karabakh. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL,
Inc.

. . . AND TBILISI. Boutros-Ghali arrived in Tbilisi from Baku on
31 October amid intensive security precautions and demonstrations
to protest the presence of Russian peacekeeping forces in
Abkhazia, Western and Russian agencies reported. After addressing
the Georgian parliament, he told reporters he would request the
deployment of additional UN observers to Abkhazia, but reportedly
disappointed the Georgian leadership by failing to advocate the
dispatch of UN peacekeepers. Boutros-Ghali listed as central to a
settlement of the Abkhaz conflict respect for Georgia's
territorial integrity, the inviolability of its frontiers, and the
implementation of all UN Security Council resolutions on Georgia;
he is to submit further recommendations to the UN Security Council
after the next round of UN-sponsored talks on a political
settlement of the conflict later this month. -- Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL, Inc.

SOCIAL DEPRIVATION IN KAZAKHSTAN, GEORGIA, ARMENIA. The city of
Kentau in southern Kazakhstan was described by a local trade union
official as "on the threshold of a social explosion", Interfax
reported on 28 October. The city has been without gas or running
water for several months, power supplies are switched off during
the day, workers have not received their wages for six months and
pensioners their pensions for 3 to 4 months. Suicides, deaths from
malnutrition and out-migration are on the increase. ITAR-TASS on
28 October quoted an official from the UN World Food Program as
predicting that 483,000 Georgians risk starvation this coming
winter without massive international aid which the organization is
not in a position to provide. In Armenia, teachers went on strike
on 1 November to demand multiple salary increases and that schools
be heated during the winter, Interfax reported. -- Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

A JOINT RUSSO/UKRAINIAN BLACK SEA FLEET? A "high-ranking" Russian
diplomat believes that recent statements by Ukrainian Deputy Prime
Minister Evhen Marchuk indicate Ukraine might accept the idea of a
unified Black Sea fleet. As quoted by Interfax on 1 November,
Marchuk said that Ukraine had "changed the vector of the
negotiating process" with Russia over the division of the
ex-Soviet fleet "from division for the sake of division, to the
organization of two structures for interaction and cooperation."
Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma that day named Marchuk to head
the Ukrainian delegation at these talks. The unnamed Russian
diplomat said Marchuk shared Kuchma's "pragmatic course," and he
expected the Ukrainian and Russian navies "to become two elements
in one structure." -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

INTERPARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY SESSION. On 29 October in St.
Petersburg, a plenary session of the CIS Interparliamentary
Assembly discussed ways of harmonizing the domestic legislation of
member states, coordination of legislative work, creation of a
legal base of the CIS Economic Union, and the development of "a
common legal space," Assembly chairman Vladimir Shumeiko, who is
also the chairman of Russia's Federation Council, said at a news
conference and in interviews on 29 and 30 October. The session
worked out a "charter of social rights and guarantees" of the CIS
states' citizens, which is to be forwarded to the states'
parliaments for adoption; it resolved to work out "a model
legislation on citizenship in the CIS;" and discussed a "model
civil code" for the CIS states. Shumeiko stressed to ITAR-TASS
that "Russia has no expansionist plans whatsoever, there is only a
question of mutually advantageous cooperation." He also praised
the CIS for "saving what could still be saved from the former
Union," Interfax reported. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

YELTSIN AIDE FOR DILUTION OF CIS STATES' CITIZENSHIP. Abdullah
Mikitaev, the head of Yeltsin's Presidential Administration's
Directorate on Matters on Citizenship and chairman of the special
presidential commission on citizenship legislation, reiterated on
Ostankino TV on 27 October that Russia wishes the CIS member
states to allow their Russian residents--totaling, he said, some
30 million in the "near abroad"--to hold the citizenship of the
Russian Federation in addition to the citizenship of the each
state. Mikitaev hoped that "the new states will not fear that this
is some new form of Russian hegemony or pressure . . . Dual
citizenship is an institution of trust among states." Mikitaev
argued that arrangements for dual citizenship among Russia and
individual states of the CIS can pave the way toward a single CIS
citizenship and ultimately toward world citizenship. -- Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

HEAVY FIGHTING IN BOSNIA CONTINUES. On 1 November international
agencies reported that serious fighting continues throughout
Bosnia, with some of the most intense clashes taking place in the
Bihac area in northwestern Bosnia. Hina reported that Croat units
were taking an active role in the fighting, backing Muslim forces.
On 1 November, Bosnian Croat forces reportedly destroyed two tanks
and overwhelmed Bosnian Serb positions near the Serb-held town of
Kupres in west-central Bosnia. On 1 November Reuters reported that
the Muslim offensive near the town of Bihac may be slowing down
due to the serious resistance being offered by the Bosnian Serb
forces. Finally, at least an estimated 2,000 rebel Serb soldiers
in the Croatian area of Krajina have mobilized for possible action
in Bosnia. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

ALLIANCE FOR MACEDONIA WINS BIG MAJORITY. On 1 November
international agencies reported that Macedonia's electoral
commission announced that President Kiro Gligorov's governing
Alliance for Macedonia has garnered a minimum of 90 seats in the
120-seat legislature following a second round of voting on 30
October. The Alliance had obtained 8 seats in the initial polling
held on 16 October. On 31 October Macedonian state TV reported
that the Alliance had secured 83 seats in the second round of
voting; however, AFP reported the following day that it had won
only 82. AFP also reports that the latest round of balloting was
"marred by an opposition boycott." The nationalist VMRO-DMNPE and
the Democratic Party, which urged their followers to support
boycott action, reportedly secured no seats. -- Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL, Inc.

MILOSEVIC SUPPORTS MARTIC? On 31 October Reuters reported that the
leader of the rebel Serbs in Croatia's Krajina area, Milan Martic,
has discounted all reports that Serbian President Slobodan
Milosevic plans to give up support for the self-styled Republic of
Serbian Krajina. According to Martic, Milosevic has no plans to
recognize the Zagreb government until Krajina secures statehood.
Martic reportedly observed that Milosevic has promised "he would
never recognize Croatia if it had an adverse effect on us."
Milosevic's recent embargo against the Bosnian Serbs, however, has
fueled wide speculation that the Serbian president is preparing to
extend recognition to Croatia and Bosnia. -- Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIAN PREMIER CALLS OFF VISIT TO POLAND. Russian Prime Minister,
Victor Chernomyrdin, on 1 November called off a visit to Poland
due to start on 3 November because of a dispute over alleged
police brutality toward Russian tourists in Warsaw. The row
concerns an incident at Warsaw's railway station on 23 October,
during which several Russian passengers were mistreated by the
Polish police. According to Polish media reports, the incident
started when the Russians, traveling on a train from Moscow to
Brussels, were held up by a group of Russian-speaking bandits
while the train stopped in Warsaw. The passengers were reported to
have called the police, but then refused to make formal charges
against the bandits. When the police departed, the passengers
demanded to see a Russian consul and awaiting his arrival set off
the train's alarm, impeding its departure. The Russian consul
failed to arrive at the station, however, and the police were
forced to step in again to get the train moving. In the ensuing
violence, some Russian passengers were roughed up and several were
arrested. Poland has expressed regret over the incident and said
that an investigation on it has begun. The Russian government said
that the Polish response was not satisfactory, while the Russian
media turned it into a major news event. Chernomyrdin was to sign
a multibillion dollar deal in Warsaw to construct a pipeline which
would allow Russia to lower its dependence on Ukraine for the
transport of its gas to the West. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL,
Inc.

POPIELUSZKO'S KILLER RELEASED FROM PRISON. Grzegorz Piotrowski,
the condemned murderer of the Warsaw priest Jerzy Popieluszko, on
30 October was released from prison on five-year parole.
Piotrowski and three other former police officers were involved in
the October 1984 murder of the popular priest and were condemned
to prison terms in February 1985. During the years, they were
gradually paroled. Piotrowski, who was sentenced to 25 years, was
the last one to gain freedom. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL, Inc.

MECIAR ASKED TO FORM GOVERNMENT. Slovak President Michal Kovac has
formally asked former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar to form a new
government. TASR reports that the nomination was conveyed to
Meciar in a letter on 31 October. Kovac had offered the post to
Meciar during a meeting of the two politicians on 27 October but
Meciar asked Kovac to delay the formal appointment until Meciar's
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia could discuss it. The party's
executive board gave its approval on 29 October. The MDS won most
seats in the parliamentary elections held on 30 September and 1
October but failed to win a majority. The party's executive board
asked Meciar to build a coalition but the prospects for such a
coalition are unclear after a series of unsuccessful talks between
the MDS and the parties that are members of the current government
coalition. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

SOUTH AFRICAN FOREIGN MINISTER IN PRAGUE. Alfred Nzo arrived in
the Czech Republic on 30 October for a five-day official visit. On
31 October Nzo met with Czech President Vaclav Havel and Prime
Minister Vaclav Klaus. CTK reports Havel as saying after his
meeting with Nzo that "South Africa is an example for other
countries" in solving racial and ethnic problems. Klaus and Nzo
discussed bilateral relations, in particular possibilities for
expanding bilateral trade. In their meeting, on 1 November,
Zieleniec and Nzo agreed that the countries will soon sign an
agreement preventing double taxation. Speaking to reporters in
Prague on 1 November, Nzo said South Africa's new black-led
government has to "come out to show that it us a ready citizen of
the world." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

HAVEL IN HUNGARY. On the first day of his two-day official visit
on November 1 Czech President Vaclav Havel held talks with his
Hungarian counterpart Arpad Goncz, MTI reports. At a joint press
conference, the two presidents stressed the importance of
strengthening bilateral economic and cultural ties. Havel spoke of
his friendship to Goncz and of the need to extend the friendly
spirit to bilateral relations. Goncz, for his part, said that
Hungary regarded the Czech Republic not only as an important
country in the Central European region but also as its partner.
Havel is scheduled to meet Prime Minister Gyula Horn and
parliamentary leaders. -- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

JOINT OPPOSITION CANDIDATE FOR BUDAPEST MAYOR. The chairmen of
three parliamentary opposition parties, the Hungarian Democratic
Forum, the Christian Democratic People's Party, and the Alliance
of Young Democrats, agreed on 30 October to support a single
candidate for mayor of Budapest in the December local elections,
Nepszava of 31 October reports. The joint candidate is CDPP deputy
chairman and former Minister of Industry and Trade Janos Latorcai.
HDF chairman Lajos Fur praised the agreement as the first
comprehensive opposition cooperation agreement since the change of
regime in Hungary. Latorcai expressed the hope that the agreement
would mark the beginning of a long term cooperation between
opposition parties. The three parties also agreed to run joint
candidates in the local elections in a Budapest district, and in
the towns of Szeged and Gyor, Magyar Nemzet of 1 November reports.
-- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

ILIESCU ATTENDS CASABLANCA ECONOMIC FORUM. Romania's President Ion
Iliescu on 31 October arrived in Casablanca, Morocco, to attend a
high-level conference on economic cooperation in the Middle East
and Northern Africa. Radio Bucharest, which covered the event
extensively, said that Romania was the only Central-East European
state to have been invited to the conference. In a speech
delivered on 1 November, Iliescu stressed his country's
willingness to participate in the economic reconstruction of the
region following the recent progress of the peace process there.
Iliescu had talks with King Hassan II of Morocco, Palestinian
leader Yasser Arafat, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and
other senior officials from the Middle East and Northern Africa.
The Romanian delegation flies to London on 2 November. -- Dan
Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

DRAFT 1995 BUDGET SUBMITTED TO ROMANIA'S PARLIAMENT. On 1 November
Radio Bucharest reported the official registration of the draft
1995 budget with the Chamber of Deputies, one day after the
document had been submitted to Romania's bicameral parliament. The
draft had been approved by Romania's government on 29 October. In
an interview with Radio Bucharest, Premier Nicolae Vacaroiu said
that the draft provides for continued austerity, and that boosting
investments and combating inflation remained priorities in 1995.
However, Vacaroiu stressed that the draft includes increased
social welfare spending, such as higher unemployment benefits and
pensions. -- Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVA REBUFFS ROMANIAN IRREDENTISM. The Moldovan Parliament on
28 October adopted a declaration chastising recent "statements by
Romanian leaders denying the existence of Moldova as an
independent state and of the Moldovans as a people. The Romanian
leadership's recent statements throw into doubt the sincerity of
its previous policy of supporting Moldova's independence."
Allowing for the possibility that those statements "might perhaps
be made under pressure from extremist nationalist forces," the
declaration called for "good-neighborly" Moldovan-Romanian
relations, noted the international community's support for
Moldovan statehood and for stability in the region, and urged
Romania to observe "European norms" in its conduct toward Moldova.
-- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

NEW MINISTERIAL APPOINTMENTS IN UKRAINE. Ukrainian President
Leonid Kuchma issued a decree on 31 November appointing new deputy
prime ministers, Ukrainian television reported. Viktor Pynzenyk
was named first deputy prime minister for economic reform; Evhen
Marchuk was appointed first deputy prime minister and the head of
the coordinating committee for combating corruption and organized
crime; Petro Sabluka was appointed a deputy prime minister for the
agricultural complex. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

CRIMEA FAILS TO BRING ITS CONSTITUTION IN LINE WITH UKRAINE'S.
Reports from 31 October made it unlikely that Crimea would meet
the deadline of 1 November to bring its constitution in line with
Ukraine's. Ukrainian television reported that although the Crimean
parliament had been meeting in closed sessions for a whole week
debating the issue, no resolutions had been passed. On 28 October
the deputy speaker of the Crimean parliament, Viktor Mezhak, told
Interfax that the Ukrainian demand regarding the constitution made
little sense since Ukraine itself is still only in the process of
drafting its own constitution. Mezhak said it would be more
logical for Ukraine to adopt a constitution first and then have
Crimea revise its legislation to conform with it. -- Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

SHUMEIKO IN MINSK. A Russian delegation led by the speaker of the
Federation Council, Vladimir Shumeiko, was in Minsk on 1 November
for talks on closer economic cooperation between Russia and
Belarus, ITAR-TASS reported. Shumeiko met with Belarusian Prime
Minister Mikhail Chyhir who said that the Belarusian energy debt
to Russia must not be allowed to rise. He said that Belarus may
institute a new measure to repay the country's energy debt,
whereby enterprises which are in debt to Russia must sell their
shares to Russian enterprises. Chyhir and Shumeiko also talked
about setting up groups to discuss trade and finances between
Russia and Belarus without waiting for legislation to be passed on
those issues, and without waiting for other CIS countries to
participate in such discussions. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MILITARY TRANSIT THROUGH LITHUANIA. At a press conference on 28
October President Algirdas Brazauskas said that the regulations on
transporting dangerous and military cargo of foreign states
through Lithuania would go into effect on 1 January 1995, Radio
Lithuania reports. He stressed that establishing such regulations
was an internal matter of Lithuania and that Russia would have to
observe them for any military transit to and from Kaliningrad.
Aleksandr Udaltsov, assistant director of Russian Foreign
Ministry's Second European Department, told BNS that Russia is
unsatisfied with some "purely technical" matters of the draft
agreement on military transit that Lithuania had sent it several
weeks ago. Udaltsov said that the next round of talks on the
agreement would be held this week, but Lithuanian officials did
not confirm this. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

RATIFICATION OF ESTONIAN-RUSSIAN TREATIES. On 29 October the
Estonian Justice Ministry gave acting Prime Minister Mart Laar an
expert report on how the two agreements on Russian troop
withdrawal signed by Presidents Boris Yeltsin and Lennart Meri on
26 July complied with existing Estonian laws. On 1 November Laar
said that he was asking the Justice Ministry to point out
specifically what changes in existing laws or government
regulations would have to be made so that the parliament would be
fully informed when it discusses the ratification of the
agreements, BNS reports. That same day Russian Ambassador to
Estonia Aleksandr Trofimov expressed concern about Estonia's delay
in ratifying the agreements implying that the Russian parliament
would vote on their ratification only after Estonia had done so.
-- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

FURTHER US-LATVIAN COOPERATION IN SECURITY MATTERS. At a joint
press conference on 31 October, the U.S. Under Secretary for Arms
Control and International Security Affairs, Lynn Davis, and the
Foreign Minister of Latvia, Valdis Birkavs, announced that the
United States and Latvia have agreed on further cooperation in
security and defense, Baltic media reported. During the meetings
that preceded, Davis and Latvian officials discussed various
issues, including ways to improve air traffic safety and export
control, FBI assistance in fighting organized crime, and US
assistance for the development of the Baltic Peacekeeping
Battalion, which is scheduled to be ready for participation in UN
peacekeeping operations by November 1995. -- Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL, Inc.

LATVIAN PRIME MINISTER PROPOSES ADAMSONS FOR INTERIOR MINISTER.
Diena reported on 1 November that Latvian Prime Minister Maris
Gailis will propose the commander of the border guards, Janis
Adamsons, for the post of Minister of Internal Affairs. Until he
was appointed to head the border guard in April, Adamsons served
as deputy commander of the Latvian Navy. He was born in 1956 at
Livani, Latvia and graduated from the Kiev (Ukraine) Navy School
in 1979. Following his graduation he held various posts in the
Soviet Marine Frontier Guard Forces. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL,
Inc.

LATVIAN PROSECUTOR ASSAULTED. On 28 October unidentified men
stopped the car of State Prosecutor Olgerts Sabanskis, assaulted
him and told him that his life was in danger if he continued with
the prosecution of former Latvian Communist Party leaders Alfreds
Rubiks and Ojars Potreki, who are currently being tried on charges
related to attempts to foment a coup in August 1991 in Latvia.
Latvian media note that this attack comes at a time when charges
against Ivan Kharitonov, accused of being one of the principal
leaders of organized crime in Latvia, are being investigated by
the State Prosecution and letters of petition have been submitted
to Latvian leaders to free on bail Kharitonov, Rubiks, and the
others detained in connection with those cases. Some of the
persons who signed the petitions have said that they were forced
to do so by "the mafia," while others claim that they never signed
the petitions. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Ustina Markus and Pete Baumgartner)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
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