The road uphill and the road downhill are one and the same. - Heraclitus
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 201, 21 October 1994

                              RUSSIA

CHECHEN OPPOSITION COUNTERATTACKS. Opposition forces launched a
helicopter attack against Chechen government troops north of
Grozny on 20 October, according to AFP; a spokesman for the
opposition Provisional Council said that a massive counter-
offensive would follow. Chechen government spokesmen revised
upwards to 160 their estimate of the number of opposition fighters
killed during the 19 October government offensive; government
losses were said to be between 30 and 40. Chechen Foreign Minister
Shamseddin Yusef rejected charges by the Provisional Council that
Afghan mujahedin were fighting on the government side, but did not
exclude the possibility of recruiting Afghan mercenaries should
Russia send its troops into Chechnya, Interfax reported. -- Liz
Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

KHOLODOV'S FUNERAL. The funeral of Dmitrii Kholodov, the
investigative reporter of the popular daily Moskovsky komsomolets
assassinated in a bomb blast three days earlier, took place on 20
October. The event turned into a major antigovernment
demonstration and a day of national mourning, when three major
television channels--Ostankino, Russian Television and the
independent NTV--interrupted their broadcasts at 8:30 p.m. to
commemorate the death of the 27-year-old journalist. According to
Russian TV's "Vesti," more than 10,000 mourners paid their last
respects to Kholodov at the Moscow Palace of Youth. At a meeting
following the ceremony, the crowd booed President Boris Yeltsin's
press secretary, Vyacheslav Kostikov, off the rostrum. According
to an RFE/RL correspondent in Moscow, Kostikov was only able to
address the rally after Pavel Gusev, the chief editor of Moskovsky
komsomolets and chairman of the Moscow Union of Journalists, had
intervened on his behalf. Speeches were also made by a number of
prominent radical politicians, including the father of Russian
economic reform Egor Gaidar. The speakers attacked Defense
Minister Pavel Grachev, whom they suspected of having a vested
interest in the death of the reporter, who had exposed corruption
in the military. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN DEFENDS GRACHEV. Calling him "one of the strongest Soviet
and Russian defense ministers of the last decade, the Russian
president defended Grachev against charges that he was implicated
in the death of Kholodov. The president described Grachev as "a
major statesman, a real defense minister respected by soldiers,
the president, the government, and the legislature" and called on
the Russian media not to "splash . . . mud onto the army and the
defense minister." Yeltsin told Interfax on 20 October that
Russian military leaders--and Grachev in particular--were being
victimized because they had stood by democracy in October 1993. In
fact, all those who accused Grachev at Kholodov's funeral--Gusev,
Chairman of the parliamentary Commission on Defense Sergei
Yushchenkov, and Federation Council member Yurii
Chernichenko--also supported Yeltsin in last year's showdown with
the legislature. Conversely, no members of the communist or
nationalist opposition have yet attacked Grachev publicly in
connection with the Kholodov case. -- Doug Clarke and Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

CABINET DISCUSSES BUDGET. According to Russian TV news on 20
October, the cabinet of ministers spent the entire day following
the much publicized return of Viktor Chernomyrdin from vacation
discussing the 1995 state budget in a closed session. According to
Interfax, the prime minister said that retail prices had risen by
an average of 6 percent between 11 and 15 October, but he shrugged
off suggestions that the ruble crash would lead to high inflation.
In an interview with ITAR-TASS the same day, Chernomyrdin refuted
allegations that the ruble collapse was the result of a government
plan to "repair the holes" in the budget by selling currency
reserves at higher dollar prices. He added that the Finance
Ministry and the Central Bank had underestimated the need for
strict controls on the new currency exchanges to combat the
activities of "unscrupulous people who play the market." In an
interview with Trud also on 20 October, Chernomyrdin pledged to
commit his government to a tougher line on economic reforms and
promised a strict budget. Draft figures for the 1995 budget
announced by the government the previous day include a deficit of
77.5 trillion rubles and spending of about 208.5 trillion rubles;
revenues were estimated at 131 trillion rubles. -- Penny Morvant,
RFE/RL Inc.

DUMA COMMITTEE SAYS MILITARY BUDGET TOO LOW. Nikolai Bezborodov,
the deputy chairman of the State Duma's defense committee, told
journalists in Moscow on 20 October that the government's 1995
defense spending request of 50 trillion rubles would mean a
radical cut in the Russian armed forces. As quoted by Interfax
Bezborodov--a Communist--said the government's latest proposal was
far worse than the 1994 defense budget which "made the armed
forces starve." -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

UNION PROTEST ACTION WILL TAKE PLACE. On 20 October Interfax
reported that the chairman of the Russian trade union
organization, Mikhail Shmakov, had told the State Duma that the
one-day general strike scheduled for 27 October would take place,
even if the government satisfied the unions demands before that.
The unions are demanding that employees of state-owned enterprises
receive back wages; some have not been paid since July. The day of
action will be the first joint endeavor of former Soviet official
and new independent trade unions. Interfax reported that activists
of the hard-core neocommunist opposition would take part in the
protest rallies organized by the trade unions. At the other end of
the political spectrum, Vladimir Shumeiko was quoted as saying
that the Federation Council, of which Shumeiko is the speaker,
would also support the unions' action. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL
Inc.

SIX-VOLUME HISTORY OF RUSSIAN/SOVIET INTELLIGENCE TO BE PUBLISHED.
The publishers Mezhdunarodnye otnosheniya are to release a book on
the history of the Russian foreign intelligence service, Trud
reported on 15 October. The six-volume edition will also include
chapters on the operations of the KGB foreign intelligence branch
in the Soviet period. In the preface , the director of the Russian
Foreign Intelligence Service, Evgenii Primakov, outlines the
strategic goals of his agency until the end of the century. They
include neutralizing the efforts of "outside forces" to disrupt
centripetal trends in Russia and the CIS; preventing the
proliferation of weapon of mass destruction; and monitoring the
ability of countries that took an active part in the Cold War to
develop new types of "destabilization weapon systems." The service
is also bound to support Russian foreign policy measures vis-a-vis
the West and the Chinese, Indian, Arabic, and Pacific regions. --
Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

ASSASSINATION OF PLUTONIUM PLANT MANAGER. Interfax and RFE/RL's
correspondent in Chelyabinsk reported on 20 October that Vladimir
Turusin, deputy director in charge of personnel matters the
Radio-Chemical Plant Mayak, had been assassinated earlier that
day. Mayak produces plutonium in the closed city Chelyabinsk-65.
Russian Minister of Internal Affairs Viktor Erin went to the city
to investigate the case. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

REPLICA OF PETER THE GREAT'S SHIP IN TROUBLE. Reuters reported on
20 October that a replica of the Holy Spirit, a sailing ship built
in 1702 for Peter the Great's navy, was adrift in a North Sea
storm with one of the five crew members dead. The ship had been
bound for Amsterdam to take part in a commemoration of Peter's
visit to the Netherlands, where he studied shipbuilding. -- Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIK DEPUTY PREMIER KILLED ON FIRST DAY OF CEASE-FIRE. Shortly
before a UN-sponsored cease-fire between Tajik government and
opposition forces went into effect on 20 October, Tajik Deputy
Prime Minister Munavarsho Nazriev and his driver were killed when
his car set off a landmine in the Garm region east of Dushanbe,
Western and Russian agencies reported. A Tajik government official
told Reuters later in the day that the Tajik authorities hoped the
incident would not endanger the cease-fire. Uncharacteristically,
the government did not immediately accuse the opposition of
terrorism. A third round of talks between Tajik government and
opposition representatives opened in Islamabad on 20 October, and
the head of the opposition delegation, former top Tajik clergyman
Akbar Turadzhonzoda, accused the government of murdering two
political prisoners. The previous day Helsinki Watch announced
that the Tajik government had broken its promise to the opposition
to release 27 political prisoners. The opposition had made an
amnesty for political prisoners a condition for continuing talks
with the government. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

AZERI WITH WEAPONS-GRADE URANIUM SEIZED IN TURKEY. Turkish police
reported on 20 October that they had seized an Azeri in Istanbul
who was trying to sell 750 grams of enriched uranium obtained in
Azerbaijan. According to Reuters and the Turkish news agency
Anatolia, the police said the 46-year-old Azeri had obtained the
uranium in Baku, crossed into Turkey from Armenia, and then
traveled to Istanbul, where he attempted to sell it for $60,000.
An official at an Istanbul testing center was quoted as saying
that the uranium was of weapons-grade quality. -- Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

NAZARBAEV ON CIS INTEGRATION. Kazakhstan's President Nursultan
Nazarbaev, one of the most articulate champions of greater
economic integration within the CIS, told Interfax on the eve of
the CIS summit on 21 October that the creation of an inter-CIS
economic committee was the most important item on the agenda.
Another issue to be discussed is Nazarbaev's March proposal for a
Eurasian Union that would provide an organizational framework for
an economic, monetary, and political union. Although Nazarbaev
said that the idea had received considerable support within the
CIS and even in the Baltic States and that some East European
countries had shown an interest in it, a number of CIS heads of
state have voiced serious reservations, fearing a resurrection of
the USSR. Nazarbaev noted that economic integration was necessary
to counter the loss of the Soviet domestic market, since the
former Soviet republics had had very limited success in finding
new markets. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

UPDATE ON UKRAINIAN-RUSSIAN FRIENDSHIP TREATY . . . The draft of
the Ukrainian-Russian treaty, which will form the basis of
relations between the two countries, has yet to be completed,
Interfax reported on 20 October. It had initially been hoped that
the agreement would be signed in early October. One of the
stumbling blocks has been the issue of dual citizenship, which
Ukraine unequivocally opposes. According to Dmytro Tabachnyk, the
head of Ukraine's presidential staff, Russia has now agreed to
remove references to this issue from the text of the treaty. Other
differences center on the wording of the clauses dealing with
territorial integrity and the inviolability of borders. The issue
of the Black Sea Fleet has reportedly been left out, since it is
so controversial. It is hoped that the differences will be
resolved during the 21 October meeting between Yeltsin and
Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . AND BELARUSIAN-RUSSIAN FRIENDSHIP TREATY. Belarus and Russia
have finished drafting a treaty on friendship and cooperation,
Belarusian radio reported on 19 October. At a press conference in
Moscow following the conclusion of the negotiations, Belarusian
Deputy Foreign Minister Piotr Byalyaeu said the treaty did not
impinge on either country's sovereignty. The agreement is meant to
prevent any future misunderstandings and to strengthen economic
and cultural ties. Byalyaeu stressed that cooperation with Russia
was a priority for the Belarusian leadership and that it served
Belarus's interests. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

UN BOSNIA OPERATIONS THREATENED BY SERB BLOCKADES. International
media on 20 October reported that Serb forces are still blockading
UN fuel shipments, creating a critical situation for the UN
peacekeeping mission. UN spokesman Thant Myint-U says if the Serbs
continue to refuse to allow fuel-carrying convoys to cross Bosnian
Serb territories, the UN will run out of fuel within days,
jeopardizing its ability to continue its mission. Reuters reports
that UN officials suspect Bosnian Serb army General Ratko Mladic
of being responsible for the blockade. Meanwhile, UN special envoy
to the former Yugoslavia Yasushi Akashi on 21 October arrives in
Bosnia for meetings with Bosnian government officials and Bosnian
Serb leaders. He is expected to urge the Bosnian Serbs to stop
blockading UN fuel and humanitarian supplies. -- Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL Inc.

MILOSEVIC ON MILITARY CAMPAIGNS IN BOSNIA. Serbian President
Slobodan Milosevic, in a speech delivered the previous day marking
the 50th anniversary of Serbia's liberation from fascist
occupation, said the Bosnian Serbs have benefited greatly from the
fact that "the international community has recognized both [the
Bosnian Serbs'] territory and struggle," Borba on 21 October
reports. He maintained that the Bosnian Serb side has secured its
objective of self-defense and that any further military campaigns
would constitute "territorial aggression against others."
Meanwhile, international agencies on 21 October report that
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic is not ready to welcome
peace. He is quoted as saying the previous day that the world is
"wasting its time" waiting for the Bosnian Serbs to accept a peace
plan that would give them only 49% of Bosnia and Herzegovina. --
Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

MACEDONIAN PRESIDENT RE-ELECTED. International agencies on 21
October report that the Macedonian Election Commission announced
the previous day that President Kiro Gligorov has been re-elected,
garnering roughly 52 percent of the vote in the 16 October
elections. The commission also reported that some 70 percent of
eligible voters took part in the ballot. The results of the
parliamentary elections are to be made known on 21 October.
Opposition parties have complained about election irregularities
and threatened to stage demonstrations aimed at forcing new
elections. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

RENEWED CALL FOR CONSOLIDATION OF KOSOVAR SHADOW STATE. The
Association of Independent Kosovar Lawyers on 12 October said "the
current situation in Kosovo is still tense" and "state terror
continues," Rilindja reported on 13 October. The association
called for the Kosovar shadow state to be consolidated faster and
cooperation between its institutions to improve. The Kosovar
shadow government's term of office expired in December 1993, and
the new parliament has been prevented from convening by the
police. Meanwhile, it appears that Fehmi Agani, the deputy leader
of the main Kosovar political group, the Democratic League of
Kosovo, will remain in office. He resigned in September but has
since withdrawn his resignation. -- Fabian Schmidt, RFE/RL Inc.

WALESA WANTS TO CHANGE POLAND'S POLITICAL SYSTEM. President Lech
Walesa, speaking on 20 October at a conference in the city of
Torun, said the Polish political system was "ineffective" and
should be changed to give more power to the president. When asked
what the "strong president" would do to improve living conditions
in the country, he promised to provide details later. Walesa's
demands for political change came on the heels of his strong
attack on the current government for its mismanagement of economic
and political matters. The president told Rzeczpospolita on 20
October that if he had the power, he would have "dismissed this
government long ago." He was particularly critical of Prime
Minister Waldemar Pawlak, accusing him of "dragging his feet" on
important decisions. "It should be written into the constitution
who is the leader; until such a time, I remain convinced that a
leadership is needed to conduct Polish matters and reforms. The
guarantee of this is a presidential system [that] should be
written into the constitution," he noted. Walesa's demands for a
new political system have generally been seen as part of his
campaign for reelection--the presidential ballot is scheduled for
November 1995--but they also have had an impact on current
politics. The president was criticized by the Sejm recently for
destabilizing the country. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL Inc.

PAWLAK IN NEW YORK. Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak arrived in New
York on 20 October to attend a gathering marking the 50th
anniversary of the Polish National Congress, an organization
representing Poles in the US. He spent his first day touring Chase
Manhattan Bank and meeting with representatives of several US
business corporations. The prime minister visit has been clouded
by Polish press criticism of his decision to accept the
"hospitality services" of several US businesses during his US
trip. Most Warsaw newspapers said on 20 October that such
"services" (including the use of company airplanes) should not be
accepted by a head of government because he may be regarded as
potentially corruptible. The Polish government, however, has
ignored such criticism. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL Inc.

CZECH INTERIOR MINISTER REGRETS KILLINGS OF GERMANS. Czech and
German media reported on 20 October that Jan Ruml has written to
Bavarian Interior Minister Guenther Beckstein expressing regret
over the death of two Germans killed by Czech police in September
and at the beginning of October. The Bavarian ministry released
excerpts of the letter, in which Ruml promised a careful
investigation of the incidents. Ruml said he will follow the
investigation very carefully. But he added that foreigners often
provoke conflicts by not showing Czech policemen sufficient
respect. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

CZECH CENTRAL BANK RAISES INTEREST RATES. The Czech National Bank
has raised two major interest rates by half a percent, beginning
24 October. CTK quotes bank spokesman Martin Svehla as saying the
rates are being increased to prevent consumer prices from soaring.
He said the bank's council determined that Czech wages are
increasing and economic expansion is continuing. The discount rate
will be increased to 8.5 percent and the Lombard rate 11 percent.
-- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK COALITION DISCUSSIONS CONTINUE. Parliament chairman and
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia member Ivan Gasparovic, in an
interview with TASR on 20 October, urged that a new cabinet be
formed promptly, saying "the greatest tragedy" would be if new
parliamentary elections had to be called. Gasparovic noted that
one way out of the current political stalemate would be to set up
a cabinet of experts. Meanwhile, incumbent Premier and Democratic
Union Chairman Jozef Moravcik told CTK that even though the MDS
refuses to talk with the Democratic Union, he can still imagine a
broad coalition government including both parties. Also on 20
October representatives of the Common Choice and Hungarian
coalition met for a second round of coalition talks, TASR reports.
Party of the Democratic Left Chairman Peter Weiss, whose group is
the dominant member of Common Choice, said the formation of a
government with the Hungarians was "unrealistic," given the
election results and the differences between the two groups'
programs. Hungarian leaders disagreed with Weiss and said they
envisioned a cabinet comprised of the current ruling parties and
the Hungarians, with the support of the Association of Slovak
Workers. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

MECIAR GETS TOP RATINGS IN OPINION POLL. In a poll taken by the
Slovak Statistical Office between 6 and 13 October and carried by
TASR on 20 October, 28 percent of the respondents chose Movement
for a Democratic Slovakia Chairman Vladimir Meciar as the Slovak
politician in whom they have most trust. Premier Jozef Moravcik
came second with 15 percent, followed by parliament chairman Ivan
Gasparovic (10 percent), President Michal Kovac and Association of
Slovak Workers Chairman Jan Luptak (9 percent each) and Party of
the Democratic Left Chairman Peter Weiss (8 percent). Respondents
were asked to chose from among 70 politicians and to name the
three they trusted most. While 15 politicians had the trust of at
least 2 percent of respondents, 31 percent said they did not trust
any politician. The poll differs from the one taken by Slovak
Radio just after the elections, in which respondents were asked to
express trust or mistrust in 21 politicians. Luptak came out on
top in that poll and Meciar seventh. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARY REPORTS DROP IN BORDER VIOLATIONS. Border Guard spokesman
Colonel Attila Krisan told MTI on 20 October that border
violations during the first nine months of 1994 reached nearly
19,000--13 percent down on the same period in 1993. Most of the
violations were at the Austrian and Romanian borders, with
Romanian citizens accounting for more than half of the violations
(10,300), followed by Serbs (3,417), Ukrainians (799), Turks
(856), and Bulgarians (389). Some 5,600 people were expelled from
Hungary during the same period, including more than 4,000 Romanian
citizens. In addition, 92,000 foreigners, half of them Romanian
citizens, were refused entry into Hungary. -- Alfred Reisch,
RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN-RUSSIAN TRADE INCREASES. Russian Economics Ministry
representative Evgenii Samorukov said Russian-Hungarian trade was
increasing, with Hungary accounting for 10 percent of Russia's
foreign trade in 1992 and 17 percent in 1993 He noted that Hungary
had moved up from 12th to 7th position among Russia's trade
partners. During the first nine months of 1994, Hungarian-Russian
trade reached $3 billion. Hungary will also receive this year
Russian goods worth $100 million to reduce Moscow's outstanding
foreign debt to Hungary, MTI reported. -- Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL
Inc.

SOUTH KOREAN CARS TO BE BUILT IN ROMANIA. Western agencies
reported on 20 October that the South Korea's Daewoo Motors and
Romania's Automobile Craiova have agreed to produce cars at the
Romanian company's plant in Craiova. Daewoo Motors will invest
$306 million in the joint project and have a 51 percent majority
shareholding. The production of the new cars, to be called Rodae
Automobile, will begin by the end of 1995. The general manager of
Automobile Craiova said the first cars will be shipped to Western
Europe, but later they will also be available to buyers in Romania
and other parts of Central and Eastern Europe. -- Michael Shafir,
RFE/RL Inc.

NEW BULGARIAN PREMIER ON GOVERNMENT PRIORITIES. Reuters reported
on 20 October that Bulgaria's first woman premier, Reneta
Indzhova, talked to reporters in Sofia following the first meeting
of her newly appointed caretaker cabinet. Indzhova said her
government's priorities included fighting crime and promoting
foreign investment and privatization. She did not, however, field
any questions. Indzhova was named premier on 17 October, replacing
Lyuben Berov. Bulgarians will vote in parliamentary elections on
18 December--for the third time since the collapse of communism in
1989. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

RIFT BETWEEN ALBANIAN SOCIALISTS AND ALIA. An unprecedented rift
has emerged between former Albanian communist leader Ramiz Alia,
currently serving a prison sentence, and the Albanian Socialist
(formerly communist ) Party. The daily Zeri i Popullit published
on 4 October an open letter from Servet Pellumbi, deputy chairman
of the ASP, refuting allegations made by Alia in a letter to
another Socialist leader. Pellumbi says Alia is less afraid of
"the penal sentence he received than of the judgment of history,
which does not recognize appeals." He claims that Alia is trying
to create "splits on questions of principle" within the ASP
leadership. Pellumbi also calls Alia a "coward" who used to change
his position from "one hour to the next." This sharp attack on
Alia could reflect a struggle within the ASP between die-hard
Communists and those who want to change the party's image. --
Louis Zanga, RFE/RL Inc.

BAN LIFTED ON UKRAINIAN CP. The Ukrainian Presidium of the Supreme
Council voted 13 to 3 in favor of lifting the ban on the Communist
Party of Ukraine, Ukrainian Radio reported on 19 October. The
vote, which took place after reported irregularities in an earlier
ballot in the parliament, was criticized by nationalist leaders
but welcomed by left-wing groups. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

BELARUSIAN PRESIDENT INVITED TO CHINA. President of the People's
Republic of China Jiang Zemin has invited Belarusian President
Alyaksandr Lukashenka to visit China in January 1995, Belarusian
Radio reported on 19 October. China has been developing its
economic relations with the former Soviet republics and is both
Russia's and Ukraine's largest non-CIS trading partner. -- Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIAN BY-ELECTION TO BE POSTPONED? The Homeland Union
released a statement on 20 October proposing that the by-election
in Kaisiadorys be postponed, Radio Lithuania reports. The vote is
scheduled to be held on 13 November. The Kaisiadorys parliament
seat has been empty since February 1993, when Algirdas Brazauskas
vacated it on becoming president. Four subsequent elections were
deemed invalid owing to insufficient turnout. The Chief Election
Commission has approved the registration of only one candidate,
Liudvikas Sabutis, nominated by the Homeland Union. But since it
considers such a situation "abnormal," the union calls for either
extending the registration of candidates for one month or
postponing the vote until 1995 so that it would coincide with the
republic-wide local elections. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

MILITARY TRANSIT THROUGH LITHUANIA. Prime Minister Adolfas
Slezevicius, at a press conference on 20 October, denounced
opposition efforts to block a military transit agreement with
Russia, Radio Lithuania reports. He said the G-24 ambassadors
accredited to Lithuania recently expressed satisfaction with
Lithuania's military transit policy. He noted that Russia had not
officially commented on the recently approved Lithuanian military
transit regulations. Seimas deputies who recently visited Moscow
said at a separate press conference that Russian lawmakers were
dissatisfied with these regulations and would apply pressure to
make them more favorable to Russia. Russia will grant Lithuania
most-favored-nation trade status only when such a military transit
agreement is signed. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

ESTONIAN PRESIDENT NOMINATES TARAND AS PRIME MINISTER. Lennart
Meri nominated on 20 October Environmental Protection Minister
Andres Tarand to replace Mart Laar as prime minister. The
parliament turned down Meri's first candidate for the position,
Bank of Estonia President Siim Kallas. Tarand now has to formulate
policy guidelines for the new cabinet and obtain the parliament's
approval before he can go ahead with forming a new government. If
the parliament fails to endorse his program, it will have to name
a new prime minister. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

GROWING NUMBER OF RUSSIAN CITIZENS IN ESTONIA. Vasilii Ostapchuk
of the Russian Embassy in Tallinn told BNS on 19 October that
there were 52,411 Russian citizens residing in Estonia on 1
October and that their numbers were increasing. Yurii Mishin, head
of the Narva Union of Russian Citizens, said local residents
wishing to apply for Russian citizenship are now being issued with
numbers to stand in line, presumably at the consulate, in February
1995. The Narva consulate receives 60-70 applications daily.
Mishin speculated that the increase was caused by lack of clarity
over non-citizens' travel documents and Russia's plans to stop
granting citizenship to citizens of the former USSR under present
regulations in February 1995. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

LATVIAN PARLIAMENT ENDORSES LATVIAN-RUSSIAN ACCORDS. The Saeima on
20 October supported in principle the ratification of all four
Latvian-Russian accords related to the withdrawal of Russian
troops from Latvia, Baltic media reported. The accords were signed
by the presidents of the two countries on 30 April. The vote was
56 to 14 with 8 abstentions. The negative votes and abstentions
came from deputies of Latvia's National Independence Movement,
Christian-Democratic Union, the Farmers' Union, and the faction
For Fatherland and Freedom. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Penny Morvant and Jan Cleave)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
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Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


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