We are so bound together that no man can labor for himself alone. Each blow he strikes in his own behalf helps to mold the universe. - K. Jerome
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 199, 19 October 1994

                              RUSSIA

CHERNOMYRDIN DENIES HAVING SUBMITTED HIS RESIGNATION. The 8:00
p.m. edition of Russian Television's newscast "Vesti" on 18
October cited the radio station Ekho Moskvy and the independent
television channel NTV as saying that Russian Prime Minister
Viktor Chernomyrdin had submitted his resignation to President
Boris Yeltsin. Later in the same program, the newscaster reported
that Chernomyrdin's press secretary, Viktor Sergeev, had called
the studio to say that the prime minister, on vacation in the
Black Sea resort of Sochi, had denied the allegation in the
strongest possible terms. Speculation regarding Chernomyrdin's
future has surfaced following his failure to interrupt his holiday
to meet Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Russia. -- Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

JOURNALISTS SHOCKED BY ASSASSINATION OF REPORTER . . . Several
organizations of Russian journalists met on 18 October to voice
their outrage over the murder of Dmitrii Kholodov, a reporter for
Moscow's most popular daily, Moskovsky komsomolets, who had been
investigating corruption in the military (see Daily Report of 18
October). Speakers asked the journalists to set aside their
political differences and unite against "the criminal structures
that rule the country"; Russian newscasts the same day called on
Muscovites to attend Kholodov's funeral on 20 October. The Russian
Union of Journalists and organizations of Afghan war veterans have
offered a large reward for information leading to the arrest of
those responsible for planting the suitcase bomb that killed
Kholodov and wounded another reporter at the offices of Moskovsky
komsomolets on 17 October. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . BLAME THE AUTHORITIES. The chief editor of Moskovsky
komsomolets, Pavel Gusev, and other journalists have blamed
Kholodov's assassination on the Federal Counterintelligence
Service (former KGB) and the Russian High Command, pointing the
finger at Colonel General Matvei Burlakov, former commander of the
Western Group of Forces in Germany and now a deputy defense
minister; Defense Minister Pavel Grachev; and even President
Yeltsin. Gusev, who is also the chairman of the Moscow branch of
the Journalists' Union, told RFE/RL that Yeltsin had invited a
number of editors to a meeting to discuss Kholodov's assassination
later in the week, but he had not been asked to attend. Burlakov,
meanwhile, refuted Gusev's charges, denying once again that the
Russian forces in Germany were guilty of corruption and arms
trafficking. According to Interfax on 18 October, he said that the
conduct of the forces in Germany had been checked by three
presidential, 20 parliamentary, and 18 other commission during the
last three years. He offered condolences to Kholodov's family,
saying: "We are mourning the man who died doing his combat duty."
-- Julia Wishnevsky and Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

OTHER EXPLANATIONS OF JOURNALIST'S MURDER. Various commentators
have speculated that Kholodov's murder was linked to his coverage
of the recent crisis in Chechnya (he was Moskovsky komsomolets's
special correspondent in Grozny) rather than to his investigation
into corruption in the military. Kholodov is also said to have
came across information about a secret camp the military allegedly
uses to train criminals for service in regional "hot spots,"
according to Segodnya of 18 October. Gusev told an RFE/RL
correspondent that his newspaper knew the name of a secret camp
near Ryazan and was going to publish a report about it. Meanwhile,
Federal Counterintelligence Service experts said the explosive
device left in Kholodov's suitcase showed that his murder was the
work of professionals. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN NOMINATES ILYUSHENKO AS PROSECUTOR-GENERAL. According to
Interfax of 18 October, Yeltsin has submitted a proposal to the
Federation Council nominating Aleksei Ilyushenko for the post of
Russian prosecutor-general. Earlier this year, the upper chamber
of the Russian parliament refused to approve Ilyushenko's
nomination, and he has been serving as acting prosecutor-general
since then. In his capacity as head of the presidential control
commission, Ilyushenko cleared the commanders of the Western Group
of Forces in Germany of charges of corruption and illegal arms
sales, thereby overturning the findings of Ilyushenko's two
predecessors, Valerii Makharadze and Yurii Boldyrev, and of German
intelligence. Ilyushenko was also involved in the controversial
corruption charges leveled against former Vice President Aleksandr
Rutskoi at the start of the latter's confrontation with Yeltsin in
the summer of 1993. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

NEW CENTRAL BANK CHAIRMAN APPOINTED. On 18 October ITAR-TASS
announced the appointment of Tatyana Paramonova as acting chairman
of the Russian Central Bank. Formerly deputy chairman of the bank,
Paramonova was identified by Russian television commentators that
day as a protege of her controversial predecessor, Viktor
Gerashchenko. Yeltsin also issued a decree setting up a National
Banking Council to be chaired by the chairman of the Central Bank
ex officio, according to Russian television newscasts. -- Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

SECURITY COUNCIL DENIES INVOLVEMENT OF COMMERCIAL BANKS IN RUBLE
CRISIS. The Russian Security Council under the chairmanship of
Yeltsin met on 18 October to hear a report from the commission set
up to investigate the causes of the collapse of the ruble on 11
October, Ostankino Television reported. According to the
commission's chairman, Security Council Secretary Oleg Lobov, and
his deputy, Federal Counterintelligence Service Director Sergei
Stepashin, the sharp drop in the value of the ruble value was
caused by general downward trends in the Russian economy, not by a
"plot" or "negligence." Among the factors cited were the
continuing sharp declines in industrial output this year, the
artificially high rate of exchange of the ruble vis-a-vis the
dollar, and the lack of coordination between the Central Bank and
other financial authorities. The Security Council, however, did
not find that Russian commercial banks were responsible for
destabilizing the ruble, as representatives of the government and
the presidential administration had maintained. -- Victor Yasmann
and Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

DUDAEV ISSUES ULTIMATUM. Speaking on local television on 18
October, Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudaev assured the opposition
that their safety would be guaranteed provided that they lay down
their arms and surrender within three days, ITAR-TASS reported.
Chechen Interior Minister Ayub Satuev had earlier told Interfax
that government forces controlled the whole of Chechnya with the
exception of the headquarters of opposition leaders Beslan
Gantemirov and Umar Avturkhanov in Gekhi and Znamenskoe. Chechen
Vice President Zelimkhan Yandarbiev argued that there was no point
in the Chechen leadership attempting to negotiate with any of the
opposition leaders given that they were "chained dogs whose master
in is Moscow." Chechnya was ready, he said, to negotiate with
Moscow "as an equal partner." An opposition spokesman denied
government charges of demoralization among the opposition
following their retreat from Grozny on 16 October and reaffirmed
the opposition's commitment to topple Dudaev, Interfax reported.
-- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

DUMA COMMITTEE WORRIED ABOUT CHEMICAL WEAPONS. The chairman of the
State Duma's defense committee, Sergei Yushenkov, told Interfax on
18 October that his committee planned to ask President Yeltsin to
speed up the submission of draft laws on chemical disarmament. He
said the committee's recent closed hearings on the preparations
for destroying Russia's 40,000 metric tons of chemical weapons
agents showed that the preliminary measures taken so far were
"slack and inefficient." Yushenkov said that no destruction
technology had been fully developed and that there was no central
management or control of the program. He warned that by 2003-2007,
when the destruction is scheduled to start, many of the weapons
would be in an extremely dangerous condition. -- Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL Inc.

GERMAN COMPANY TO AID IN PLUTONIUM DISPOSAL. Interfax reported on
18 October that the German conglomerate Siemens hoped to develop
jointly with Mayak of Chelyabinsk-65 a pilot plant to process
plutonium removed from Russian nuclear weapons. Mayak is Russia's
largest producer of weapons-grade plutonium. The pilot plant would
produced what is called MOX mixed oxide) fuel, a mixture of
weapons-grade plutonium and natural or depleted uranium that can
be used in some nuclear power reactors. The report said that
Siemens intended to continue talks with Mayak after a detailed
analysis of unspecified proposal made by Chelyabinsk-65 nuclear
engineers. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

ZOTOV NAMED SPECIAL ENVOY TO FORMER YUGOSLAVIA. On 18 October
ITAR-TASS reported that career diplomat Aleksandr Zotov had been
named special envoy to the former Yugoslavia, replacing Deputy
Foreign Minister Vitalii Churkin. According to Foreign Ministry
sources, Zotov will take up his post in the near future. Churkin
is to become Russian ambassador to Belgium, an office that will
require him to represent Russia's interests in NATO and other
international organizations. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

CRACKDOWN CONTINUES IN AZERBAIJAN. Following the firing on 17
October of four more government ministers in connection with last
month's failed coup, Azerbaijan's President Heidar Aliev stated in
a TV address on the eve of the third anniversary of the adoption
of the Constitutional Act on Azerbaijan's independence that his
leadership would continue to implement "the most resolute
measures" against "reactionary forces," Interfax reported. Aliev
further accused former Prime Minister Suret Huseinov, whose
whereabouts remain a mystery, of "turning the cabinet into a
hotbed of crime." -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

TURKIC SUMMIT IN ISTANBUL. Heads of state of the Turkic-speaking
countries--Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkey,
Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan--opened a two-day summit in Istanbul
on 18 October, Western news agencies reported; some Turkish
sources were of the opinion that the gathering would reaffirm
cultural and economic ties but would be short on substance. A
Turkish Foreign Ministry spokesman told Reuters that Turkey saw
the summit as a demonstration of Turkey's special relationship
with the new Turkic states. Uzbek President Islam Karimov told
journalists before his departure for the summit that he hoped the
gathering would further the economic and cultural integration of
the Turkic-speaking world, but noted that many of the documents
signed at the previous Turkic summit in 1992 had remained on
paper. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

UZBEK OPPOSITIONISTS TO BE TRIED FOR TREASON. On 18 October the
RFE/RL Uzbek Service learned from sources in the opposition Erk
Democratic Party in Tashkent that six party activists are to be
put on trial for treason on 25 October. Erk spokeswoman Dilarom
Ishakova reported that she and five other Erk officials had been
ordered to appear in court to answer charges of antigovernment
activity similar to those applied to several Erk activists in
1992. Erk has been severely harassed by the Uzbek government since
mid-1992 and has been banned since late 1993 when the government
refused to allow the party to reregister. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL
Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

SERBS HIT GORAZDE AID CONVOY. International media reported on 18
October that Bosnian Serb gunners fired at a UN relief convoy
heading for Gorazde in eastern Bosnia, killing a driver and
wounding one person. Gorazde is a mainly Muslim enclave and also a
UN-declared "safe area." The Daily Telegraph on 19 October says
that British troops asked for an air strike in response to the
attack but that UN headquarters turned down the request on the
grounds that "there was no clearly identifiable target. Instead, a
strong protest was lodged with the Bosnian Serb leaders in Pale."
On 17 October, Serb gunners hit Bihac, another "safe area." The
VOA reported the next day that casualties were involved. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

HIJACKED RELIEF TRUCKS REMAIN CAPTIVE. Serbs said on 18 October
that their hijacking of a UN medical convoy near Sarajevo the
previous day had been a "mistake." But they have yet to release
the convoy and return the supplies, as they said they would. From
Srebrenica in eastern Bosnia, yet another "safe area," the Society
for Threatened Peoples said on 18 October that medical supplies
have run out but that UNPROFOR troops there "cannot or will not"
do anything to help. Finally, Tanjug reported from Jajce that
Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic predicts that the "contact
group's" plan for Bosnia will be changed in the Serbs' favor. He
said compromises depend on all sides, "most of all on the United
States and the other big powers which needed this war." -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

"GIVE FORCE A CHANCE." The VOA reported on 19 October on the
current debate in the United States on policy toward Bosnia. One
school has coined the slogan "give force a chance," on the grounds
that years of diplomacy have not brought the aggressor around to a
peace settlement. One expert said that a new strategy could
involve extending the no-fly zone to ground warfare, making any
Serb tank actually used in combat liable for destruction by NATO
forces. He added that tanks would be easy to find and destroy and
that this would help bring the Serbs to the conference table. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

IS PRISON RADICALIZING SERBIA'S RADICALS? Borba on 19 October
reports on comments made by Tomislav Nikolic, one of
ultranationalist Serbian Radical Party leader Vojislav Seselj's
lieutenants. Nikolic says the fact that Seselj is currently
serving a 30-day prison term for assaulting federal parliament
speaker Radoman Bozovic may be radicalizing the party's rank and
file. Nikolic, who views Seselj's prison sentence as politically
motivated, warns that if the authorities prolong his sentence
beyond 29 October, "there will be nothing to keep us [Radicals]
from taking to the streets to express our dissatisfaction."
Meanwhile, Politika probes the behavior of Radical deputies during
legislative debates over the past several months. It notes that
since May Radical deputies have thrown a glass of water at Bozovic
and spat on him. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

INCREASED TENSIONS AMONG TOP KOSOVO ALBANIANS. Fehmi Agani, deputy
leader of the Democratic League of Kosovo (LDK), has resigned,
Rilindja reported on 17 October. Agani expressed discontent with
the composition of the party's Central Committee following the LDK
congress on 14 July. After the congress, several young people were
appointed to the committee in what appeared to be an attempt to
make the LDK a "nonideological party." Agani recently offered and
then withdrew his resignation in protest over what he regarded as
diluting the leadership with inexperienced young people. In
another development, a recent meeting of the LDK's Central
Committee approved the "federalization" of the party's structure.
Decisions from now on are to made by consensus, Zeri reported on 5
October. -- Fabian Schmidt, RFE/RL Inc.

PORTUGUESE PRESIDENT IN POLAND. Mario Soares said in Warsaw on 18
October that his country supports Poland's plans to join NATO and
the European Union. Rzeczpospolita on 19 October quotes Soares as
emphasizing that "Poland's presence in NATO will constitute a step
toward peace and security in Europe." Gazeta Wyborcza said the
same day that Poland's contacts with Portugal will help the former
to reach its goal of joining Western organizations. The Portuguese
government has consistently argued that the issue of Polish,
Czech, Hungarian, and Slovak membership in the EU should be
approached cautiously, perhaps out of concern that the Central
European countries' admission would make it more difficult to sell
Portuguese products within the EU. Portugal is also concerned that
the Central Europeans will demand economic aid from the union.
Portugal has until now been one of the main recipients of EU aid.
-- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL Inc.

HAVEL ON JEWISH VICTIMS OF NAZISM. Speaking at the unveiling of a
memorial in the city of Ostrava on the 55th anniversary of the
first transport of Czech Jews to a Nazi concentration camp, Czech
President Vaclav Havel on 18 October warned that every concession
to racist bullies threatens to start a new cycle of horror.
Reuters and Czech media quote Havel as saying that by not
confronting evil from the outset, "what we risk is that either we
are unable to confront it later or that we can confront it only
with new human victims." Havel added: "Somewhere, deep in the last
casual anti-semitic remark or involuntary racist statement, is
raised the spectre of a gas chamber or pogrom. . . . In every
concession to a bully is raised the danger that a new wheel of
horrors will begin to turn." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK COALITION TALKS CONTINUE. Following the second round of
coalition discussions between the Christian Democratic Movement
and the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia, the CDM on 18 October
said the two parties did not reach agreement on the basic
questions it considers necessary for forming a coalition. It added
that the talks were over and that it had decided to join the
opposition. The MDS, however, said it did not rule out the
possibility of resuming talks, TASR reports. Meanwhile,
negotiations between the MDS and the Slovak National Party also
took place on 18 October. SNP Chairman Jan Slota said the search
for another coalition partner continues and he called the current
meetings with the Association of Slovak Workers "quite
successful." Ignoring the request from Slovak President Michal
Kovac to report on the results of the coalition discussions by 18
October, Dusan Kleiman, head of the MDS Press and Information
Department, said the MDS will brief the president only after talks
are completed. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN PARLIAMENT APPROVES SUPPLEMENTARY BUDGET. Hungary's
parliament on 18 October approved by a vote of 203 to 23 with one
abstention the 1994 supplementary budget, MTI reported. The
central budget deficit is to be raised from some 329.5 billion
forint to 339.9 billion. Central budget expenditures will rise to
1.6 trillion forint, an increase of some 188 billion. Revenues
will amount to 1.3 trillion forint. Finance Minister Laszlo Bekesi
says the aim of the supplementary budget is to create the
conditions for policy measures aimed at stabilizing the Hungarian
economy and introducing structural changes. -- Alfred Reisch,
RFE/RL Inc.

SPANISH FOREIGN MINISTER IN HUNGARY. Javier Solana visited Hungary
on 16 and 17 October to attend ceremonies honoring the late
Spanish diplomat Angel Sanz Briz, who saved thousands of Jews in
Hungary in 1944. Solana held talks with President Arpad Goncz,
Parliament Speaker Zoltan Gal, and his Hungarian counterpart,
Laszlo Kovacs. MTI quotes Solana as telling his hosts they could
always count on Spain's "understanding and support" for Hungary's
efforts to integrate with Europe. He also proposed the creation of
a joint committee to study Spain's experience in such efforts.
Kovacs, for his part, urged increased bilateral trade but said he
hoped Hungary's trade deficit with Spain could be reduced. Trade
between the two countries amounts to $300 million a year. --
Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN COALITION PARTNERS CHOOSE JOINT CANDIDATES. The ruling
Hungarian Socialist Party and Alliance of Free Democrats have
reached an electoral cooperation agreement for the December local
elections in the city of Szeged, southern Hungary, MTI reported on
18 October. Istvan Szalay, a college teacher, is their joint
candidate for mayor. In addition, four HSP and three AFD joint
candidates will run in Szeged's seven electoral districts. --
Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN FOREIGN TRADE. The Central Statistical Office reports
that Hungary's foreign trade registered a deficit of 270 billion
forint ($2.6 billion) during the first eight months of 1994,
according to MTI on 18 October. Imports at current prices amounted
to 926 billion forint, up 35% on the first eight months of 1993.
Exports totaled 655.5 billion forint, a 30% increase over the same
period of last year. While imports from the EU and Eastern
European countries increased, those from EFTA and developing
countries were down. Exports to the EU countries grew most
rapidly, while those to Eastern European and developing countries
increased slightly. -- Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIAN PARLIAMENT DEBATES NEW PENAL CODE. Disagreement between
Romania's Left and Right has prevented the adoption of an article
in the new penal code that would have prohibited fascist and
communist propaganda. The left-wing parties argued that the
proposed article would introduce extremism through the back door
by banning communist propaganda. After what Radio Bucharest
described on 18 October as "a verbal dispute [that came] close to
turning into a fistfight," the two sides agreed to another version
of the article that prohibits "propaganda promoting the setting up
of a totalitarian state." Those who disseminate such propaganda
are liable to receive prison sentences of between six months and
five years. -- Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIA REVISES PROPOSED BANK REGULATION. The Romanian National
Bank has revised a proposed regulation on controlling
hard-currency accounts, Romanian Television reported on 18
October. The bank announced that the new regulation will apply
only to companies and individuals authorized to act for companies.
It did not say when the new rule will go into effect. The original
draft, proposed last month, said all holders of hard currency
accounts must reveal the source of the funds and state the purpose
for each withdrawal. Several commercial banks protested this would
undermine the confidence of their customers. The National Bank
said it needed to tighten control over hard-currency accounts to
combat the black market and restore confidence in the Romanian
leu. Many Romanians change their savings into Western currencies.
-- Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

CARITAS BOSS TO REMAIN IN ROMANIAN PRISON. A Romanian court
rejected a request by the owner of the Caritas money-making
pyramid scheme to be released on bail, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported on 18 October. Ion Stoica will remain in prison until his
trial begins. He asked to be released so that he could straighten
out the company's financial situation and compensate investors who
lost money. More than 40,000 depositors are suing Stoica. --
Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

UKRAINIAN PARLIAMENT LIFTS BAN ON CP. The Ukrainian parliament
voted 201 to 105 to lift the ban on the Communist Party of Ukraine
on 18 October, international agencies reported. The move to
relegalize the party was initiated by Ukraine's new Communist
Party, registered in 1993. Its leader, Petro Symonenko, said the
party is not raising the issue of having its former property
restored at the moment. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

ANOTHER CHERNOBYL REACTOR TEMPORARILY CLOSED. Reuters and Interfax
on 18 October reported that Ukraine shut down Chernobyl's third
reactor after a crack was detected in one of its pipes. Officials
said no radiation escaped. Chernobyl's first reactor was shut down
on 8 October for routine maintenance, so no reactors are currently
working at the power station. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

NEW CABINET APPOINTMENTS IN BELARUS. Belarusian Radio on 17
October reported that President Alyaksandr Lukashenka had
appointed new cabinet ministers. Former Minister of Property.
Heorhiy Badzey was named minister of property and privatization.
Uladzimir Hancharenka was appointed minister of communications and
information. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

BELARUSIAN NATIONAL BANK ON FALL OF BELARUSIAN RUBLE. Mikalai
Luzhin, head of the hard-currency department of the Belarusian
National Bank, has said that the fall in the value of the
Belarusian ruble against other currencies is not due to any moves
by Moscow, Belarusian Radio reported on 17 October. Luzhin said
the fall was caused by the Belarusian National Bank's buying up
large sums of hard currencies on the country's currency exchange.
All hard currency in Belarus passes through the Minsk exchange,
and the national bank acquires as much as possible to pay for
essential imports. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

BELARUSIAN-MOLDOVAN TRADE AGREEMENT RATIFIED. A free trade
agreement between Belarus and Moldova was ratified by the
Belarusian parliament on 17 October, Belarusian Television
reported the same day. The agreement lifts trade barriers and
tariffs and resolves the issue of transporting goods through
Moldova or Belarus to third countries. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL
Inc.

ESTONIA RECEIVES $10 MILLION LOAN FROM WORLD BANK. The World Bank
on 18 October increased its loans to Estonia to $90.4 million when
it approved a $10 million loan to help the republic's economic
reform program, Western agencies report. The program, also
financed by the Estonian government and Sweden, will provide
long-term credits to financial enterprises being restructured and
help commercial banks reduce their credit risks by increasing
training in credit evaluation and risk asset management. It will
also help stabilize the financial sector by restructuring and then
privatizing the North Estonian Bank, the only remaining
state-owned bank in the country. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIAN-POLISH RELATIONS. Seimas Chairman Ceslovas Jursenas on
18 October signed the resolution ratifying the Lithuanian-Polish
friendship and cooperation agreement, approved by both parliaments
on 14 October, Radio Lithuania reports. He said Presidents
Algirdas Brazauskas and Lech Walesa agreed in a telephone
conversation on 17 October that it was a priority task to sign a
free trade agreement between the two countries as soon as
possible. The presidents reaffirmed their intention to step up
efforts to develop cooperation among all Central European
countries seeking membership in the European Union and closer
integration between Baltic and Visegrad countries. -- Saulius
Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIAN LAWMAKERS VISIT RUSSIAN PARLIAMENT. Seven Seimas
deputies on the parliamentary Foreign Affairs Committee ended a
three-day visit to Moscow on 18 October, Radio Lithuania reports.
They met with Russian State Duma chairman Ivan Rybkin, members of
several factions, and a deputy foreign minister. Many Russian
deputies agreed it was essential to normalize economic relations
by ratifying the most-favored-nation trade agreement, signed in
November. The lawmakers also discussed the situation of
Kaliningrad and military transit to it, the status of minorities
in the two countries, the return of Lithuanian embassy buildings
in Rome and Paris, as well as the question of Baltic security. --
Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

ESTONIA, LATVIA STILL SEEK EXACT INFORMATION ON RUSSIAN
SERVICEMEN. Ugis Sulcs of Latvia's Citizenship and Immigration
Department told BNS on 18 October that none of Moscow's lists of
Russian servicemen in Latvia is precise or complete. He said the
Latvian authorities have discovered, among other things, that at
least 1,342 Russian servicemen must leave Latvia, while the list
provided by Moscow contains only 1,115 names. Meanwhile, the
caretaker Estonian government on 18 October ordered the
Citizenship and Migration Department to take steps to limit the
illegal residence of retired Russian military personnel and their
family members in Estonia. Acting Prime Minister Mart Laar said
"some of these people have already been detained and sent out of
the country," BNS reported. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

SWEDEN TO HELP RETIRED RUSSIAN MILITARY LEAVE ESTONIA. Swedish
Foreign Minister Lena Hjelm-Wallen, on an official visit to
Estonia, met with President Lennart Meri and acting Prime Minister
Mart Laar, BNS reported on 18 October. She said the new Swedish
government wants to further improve bilateral relations and
confirmed her country's intention to provide financial aid to
retired Russian military personnel wishing to leave Estonia.
Hjelm-Wallen also said Sweden would help finance measures to clean
up pollution in the vicinity of the former Russian naval base at
Paldiski. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Penny Morvant and Jan Cleave)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
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Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


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