Forty is the old age of youth; fifty, the youth of old age. - Victor Hugo
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 195, 13 October 1994

                             RUSSIA

YELTSIN FIRES FINANCE MINISTER IN WAKE OF RUBLE PLUNGE . . .
Following the dramatic fall in the value of the ruble against the
dollar, on 12 October President Boris Yeltsin signed a decree
dismissing acting Finance Minister Sergei Dubinin, Western
agencies reported. Chief of the presidential Administration
Sergei Filatov told ITAR-TASS that a report submitted a week
earlier describing the financial markets as calm was one of the
reasons behind Dubinin's removal. Yeltsin also asked the State
Duma to dismiss Central Bank Chairman Viktor Gerashchenko, who
admitted he had made "tactical miscalculations" in not
intervening to prop up the ruble earlier. The Central Bank began
to buy rubles at the close of trading on 11 October, and the
currency regained about 5 percent of its value the following day,
closing at 3,736 to the dollar. The parliament, however,
supported Gerashchenko, delaying the vote on Yeltsin's request
until at least 19 October. -- Penny Morvant, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . APPOINTS COMMISSION TO INVESTIGATE. At a meeting of the
Security Council on 12 October, Yeltsin said the collapse of the
ruble was the result either "of sabotage or the manifestation of
a policy of extreme irresponsibility . . . by the special groups
of people who organized the ruble's disastrous fall," Interfax
reported. He decreed the establishment of a state commission to
investigate the collapse, appointing Security Council Secretary
Oleg Lobov and Federal Counterintelligence Service Director
Sergei Stepashin to head it. Stepashin later told Russian TV that
he believed the crisis was an attempt to undermine Yeltsin and
the government and said the investigation was well in hand. --
Penny Morvant, RFE/RL Inc.

STATE DUMA SCHEDULES VOTE OF NO CONFIDENCE IN GOVERNMENT.
Deputies in the Russian parliament's lower house voted on 12
October by 230 to 2 with numerous abstentions to hold a vote of
no confidence in the government following the ruble debacle, AFP
reported. State Duma Chairman Ivan Rybkin said the motion was
placed on the agenda at the insistence of the faction of the
centrist Democratic Party of Russia. Communist and nationalist
groups have been urging such a move for weeks. The deputies also
voted to override a veto by Yeltsin on legislation laying down
the rules for passing the 1995 budget. Yeltsin had rejected the
law, which requires the government to adhere to a strict
timetable when drawing up the budget, on the grounds that it
would limit the cabinet's freedom of maneuver; it must now be
passed with a two-thirds majority in the Federation Council. --
Penny Morvant, RFE/RL Inc.

KOZYREV, SHAFRANIK ON CASPIAN. On 12 October Russian Foreign
Minister Andrei Kozyrev told the Moscow conference of deputy
foreign ministers of the Caspian littoral states that there was
"no need to raise the temperature" over the contract signed last
month between Azerbaijan and a consortium of Western oil
companies, Interfax reported. Kozyrev said that he had spoken by
telephone with Azerbaijani President Heidar Aliev who had agreed
that the Caspian was an asset to be shared by all littoral
states; there were, Kozyrev continued, "no sharp irreconcilable
differences" between Russia and Azerbaijan. ITAR-TASS on 12
October quoted Azerbaijan parliament chairman Rasul Guliev as
stating that the discussion of ratification of the oil contract
by the Azerbaijani People's Assembly would last at least one
month. ITAR-TASS also quoted Russian Minister of Fuel and Energy
Yurii Shafranik as affirming that his ministry supports Russian
participation in the exploitation of the Caspian shelf. Shafranik
argued in favor of elevating the Caspian Sea Cooperation Council
(created in 1992 and now being heavily plugged by Russia) to the
status of the main organ for coordinating all exploitation of the
Caspian's mineral wealth at least until such time as the
international status of the Caspian (i.e. whether it is a sea or
a lake) is finally resolved. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

MIXED SIGNALS ON CHECHNYA. On 12 October the Chechen opposition
Provisional Council issued a statement denying a report by
Interfax on 11 October that quoted Provisional Council Chairman
Umar Avturkhanov as criticizing as "divisive" the peace mission
to Chechnya of former Russian parliament speaker Ruslan
Khasbulatov and affirming that the two men will continue to
coordinate their efforts to resolve the crisis situation.
ITAR-TASS on 12 October similarly quoted the deputy chairman of
the Russian State Duma Committee on Federation Affairs, Vladimir
Lysenko, as stating that Russian deputies had no intention of
holding separate talks with the Chechen parliament delegation
currently in Moscow, as previously reported by Interfax. -- Liz
Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

KOZYREV EXPECTED IN PERSIAN GULF. On 12 October Ostankino TV
reported that Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev would
travel to Iraq on 13 October in an effort to calm tension in the
Persian Gulf area. On 12 October an advance party of two envoys,
First Deputy Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov and head of the Foreign
Ministry's Middle East Department Viktor Posuvalyuk, arrived in
Baghdad for talks with officials. Meanwhile, Interfax quoted
Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Boris Kolokolov as saying that
Russia would intensify its efforts to ensure that no new
sanctions were levied against Iraq. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL
Inc.

RUSSIA FOR "DIVISION OF LABOR" IN CSCE. Russia's chief delegate
to the CSCE's review conference in Budapest, Yurii Ushakov, told
RFE/RL's correspondent on 12 October that Russia would continue
to promote its plan to confer on a reorganized CSCE (in practice
on a new body of several states, including Russia, vested with
veto rights) the role of "coordinating security operations of
NATO, the Western European Union, and the CIS states" in the
respective regions of the CSCE's area. Ushakov persisted in
describing such a regional arrangement as "a division of labor,"
but many of its critics view it as a division of spheres of
influence that has no chance of acceptance at the conference. In
addition, many small countries object to a hierarchical system
that would reduce their role. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

NATO TO OPEN OFFICE IN MOSCOW. NATO plans to open an information
bureau in Moscow to improve the flow of information from NATO to
the Russian leadership, Reuters reported on 12 October quoting
sources at NATO headquarters. The bureau will open by the end of
1994, be located within the French Embassy, and have a staff of
two; it will function initially for a trial period of one year.
-- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

SERVICE FAMILIES EVACUATED FROM KURILS. Quoting the Defense
Ministry's press office, Interfax reported on 12 October that
some 1,200 military dependents had been evacuated by air from the
quake zone in the Southern Kuril Islands. As many as 525 were
said to have been flown to the Moscow region where they will be
temporarily housed in the Moscow Military District. A total of
1,600 dependents--including 650 children--will be flown out of
the quake zone by 16 October. The servicemen will remain on the
islands to help in the restoration work. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL
Inc.

                 TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TERESHCHENKO EXPLAINS RESIGNATION. Kazakhstan's former Prime
Minister Sergei Tereshchenko, who resigned along with his
government on 11 October, told a press conference the following
day that a major reason for the cabinet's resignation was the
Supreme Soviet's hostility to his economic recovery program,
Russian news agencies reported. In May the Supreme Soviet tried
to force the government out of office, claiming that
Tereshchenko's anti-crisis scheme was not working and that living
standards were continuing to decline. Tereshchenko told the press
conference that he was particularly aggrieved over the
legislature's creation of a commission to hunt for corruption
among top government officials--he asserted that the Supreme
Soviet would do better to spend its time legislating. As his
government's main achievement, Tereshchenko cited the
introduction of Kazakhstan's own currency. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL
Inc.

UZBEK DISSIDENT SONGWRITER ARRESTED. The well-known Uzbek singer
and songwriter Dadakhan Hasan has been arrested in Uzbekistan's
Fergana Valley, his wife told RFE/RL on 12 October. Dadakhan
Hasan has long been a prominent member of the Uzbek opposition;
prior to Uzbekistan's independence he organized his own
opposition group in the Fergana area, but is now an active member
of the banned Erk Democratic Party. Dadakhan Hasan's wife
reported that she had been told by officials of the Ministry of
Internal Affairs that her husband had been arrested because
several rounds of ammunition were found in his car. -- Bess
Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

REPATRIATION OF GEORGIAN REFUGEES GETS UNDER WAY. More than three
months after the deployment of Russian peacekeepers along the
frontier between Abkhazia and the rest of Georgia and after
numerous delays and objections by the Abkhaz authorities, on 12
October six Georgian families returned to Abkhazia's Gali Raion
in accordance with the established procedures, AFP and Interfax
reported. AFP cited the UNHCR representative overseeing the
repatriation operation as criticizing the obstacles created by
the Abkhaz government and stating: "We could easily have sent
back 33,000 people." Also on 12 October, Interfax reported that
two leading critics of Georgian parliament chairman Eduard
Shevardnadze, former Prime Minister Tengiz Sigua, and former
Defense Minister Tengiz Kitovani, had joined forces with Boris
Kakubava, radical spokesman for the Georgian refugees from
Abkhazia, to found a National Liberation Front of Georgia pledged
to restore Georgia's territorial integrity. Kakubava has
frequently advocated a military campaign to restore Georgian
hegemony over Abkhazia. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

RUSSIA DOES NOT WANT "SUPERVISION" OF ITS PEACEKEEPING. Russia's
chief delegate to the CSCE review meeting in Budapest, Yurii
Ushakov, told RFE/RL's correspondent on 12 October that his
country would welcome CSCE support for, but not "supervision" of,
its peacekeeping operations in the CIS area. (He also indicated
that Russia would not want supervision from the UN either.)
Russia seeks an agreement in which the CSCE authorizes
peacekeeping by Russian or CIS forces in the former USSR,
provides logistical, financial, and other "material" assistance
to those operations, and supports Russian political mediation in
the conflicts, Ushakov said. Other CSCE countries could send
observers but not interfere with the Russian or CIS operations.
His remarks reiterate demands that contributed to the scuttling
in June of a draft agreement on a CSCE framework for Russian
peacekeeping operations. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVAN-RUSSIAN TROOP TALKS: END OF THE TUNNEL? Russia's chief
delegate to the troop talks with Moldova, ambassador Vladimir
Kitaev, ended on 12 October three days of talks with officials in
Chisinau to finalize the package of agreements on the withdrawal
of Russia's 14th Army from Moldova. The agreements had been
initialed on 10 August 1994 following more than two years of
negotiations, but Moscow then withheld its signature. Senior
Moldovan officials told the RFE/RL Research Institute that only
editorial refinements were made in the latest talks with Kitaev.
Chisinau hopes that the documents can be signed on its leaders'
visit to Moscow for the impending CIS summit; and it wants the
documents to be signed by the prime ministers as executive
agreements, not subject to parliamentary ratification. Some
Russian officials, however, favor signature by the presidents,
which would require parliamentary ratification, all but
guaranteeing rejection in Russia's parliament. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL Inc.

A POTENTIAL CATCH. The main agreement's latest version would
appear to weaken the linkage, sought by Russia, between the troop
withdrawal and a negotiated agreement on Transdniester autonomy.
The two processes are now to be "parallel," instead of
"synchronic." Moldova interprets the reformulation as meaning
that the withdrawal can outpace the talks on autonomy and must be
completed within the three-year period stipulated for the
pullout, whereas no timetable is set for the autonomy talks.
Russia's interpretation of this crucial point, however, will
depend on factors beyond Moldova's control. Moldova has in any
event submitted, after consultation with the CSCE mission, a plan
for far-reaching autonomy for the Transdniester. -- Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

                   CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

SEJM APPEALS TO WALESA TO STOP DESTABILIZING THE COUNTRY. By a
vote of 305 to 18 with 22 abstentions, the Polish Sejm appealed
on 12 October to President Lech Walesa to "stop actions that
could lead to a state crisis." The appeal, issued by the centrist
Union of Freedom and approved by both opposition and
pro-government parties, emphasized that the "president's actions,
violating the principles of the military's political neutrality
and the independence of the national radio and television
council, are destabilizing the constitutional order." There has
been no reaction from the President's Office to this
unprecedented parliamentary appeal, but President Walesa met
before the vote with parliamentarians from the Union of Freedom
in an attempt to defuse the conflict. Rzeczpospolita and Gazeta
Wyborcza on 13 October report that the meeting featured a stormy
discussion during which Walesa was severely criticized by his
former colleagues and advisers. The president rejected the
criticism, saying he would not "retreat" from his way of acting.
"I am convinced that I am right," Walesa said, "all I do is for
the sake of Poland and for honesty and patriotism." He added that
"the law is one thing, but success another, and the two will have
to be combined." -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL Inc.

SERBS CONTINUE TO BLOCK ROADS INTO SARAJEVO. International media
reported on 12 October that the UN is still unable to secure land
access to the besieged Bosnian capital. The same day relief
flights were also suspended following a mortar attack on the
airport, apparently by government forces. Meanwhile, the ethnic
cleansing of the Banja Luka area continues, and 212 mainly Muslim
Bosnian refugees arrived in Croatia. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL
Inc.

DIFFERENCES AMONG SERBIA'S RADICALS? Politika reports on 13
October that three Serbian Radical Party deputies in the federal
rump Yugoslav parliament who recently left the party have agreed
to form a new political party, the Serbian Radical Party "Nikola
Pasic." Pasic was a prominent Serbian nationalist and radical at
the beginning of the 20th century, and the usurping of his name
suggests the new political organization will have a largely
nationalist program. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

TUDJMAN RESHUFFLES CROATIAN GOVERNMENT. Croatian media reported
on 12 and 13 October that President Franjo Tudjman has once again
reorganized the cabinet and made major changes in the staffing of
his own office. Among the more important changes are the removal
of Jure Radic as head of Tudjman's office and his appointment as
deputy prime minister and to the key post of minister of
development and reconstruction; Hrvoje Sarinic's departure as
head of the national security office and his replacing Radic on
Tudjman's staff; the naming of Krunislav Olujic to the security
portfolio; and the departure of the unpopular minister of
culture, Vesna Girardi-Jurkic, to a diplomatic posting, possibly
to the Croatian embassy with UNESCO in Paris. Girardi-Jurkic is
best known abroad for her campaign against the independent weekly
Feral Tribune. Meanwhile, Reuters reported on 12 October that UN
human rights envoy Tadeusz Mazowiecki condemned the continued
practice of forced evictions from apartments. Ostensibly, former
tenants of the Yugoslav People's Army are being cleared out to
make way for war invalids from the Croatian Army. But in reality,
those evicted tend to be non-Croats or members of the political
opposition. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

CROATIA STAGES AIR AND SEA EXERCISES. Croatian Television on 12
October showed maneuvers in the Adriatic of navy ships and 12 MiG
fighters, apparently the largest such exercise to date. It is
unclear how the MiGs found their way into the country past the
arms embargo, but Croatian guest workers and other emigrants
abroad have contributed generously to their country's defense and
Soviet-type weapons are abundant on the world's arms markets. The
public display of force may be designed to reinforce Zagreb's
statements that the Croatian military could retake the Serb-held
territories if they wished and to reassure the population of the
Dubrovnik and Konavle areas that the Croatian military can
protect them from Serbs in nearby hills. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL
Inc.

SLOVAK CONSTITUTIONAL COURT TO REVIEW PARTY'S LISTS. At the
request of the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia and the Slovak
National Party, the Constitutional Court will examine the
validity of the Democratic Union's lists of signatures collected
to qualify for the recent parliamentary elections, TASR reports
on 12 October. Under the election law, all parties that did not
take part in previous elections are required to gain a minimum of
10,000 signatures to compete. The statement submitted to the
court claimed that the Election Commission examined the
Democratic Union's lists carelessly and did not check the
personal identification numbers of signatories, some of which
were evidently faked. The MDS is hoping that the court will find
the lists invalid and then distribute the Democratic Union's 15
parliamentary seats among the other parties represented in the
legislature, thus giving the MDS-SNP coalition a parliamentary
majority. But analysts believe it is more likely that the
election as a whole would be invalidated and a new vote would
have to be called. During the first meeting of the current
coalition council since the elections, Democratic Union Chairman
Jozef Moravcik on 12 October said his party considers the move "a
manipulation" and "deception of the citizens." (The party won a
total of 246,444 votes in the election, or 8.57% of the vote.)
Meanwhile, stressing that his party will not enter a new
coalition unless it has broad support, Christian Democratic
Movement Chairman Jan Carnogursky said he considers the
Democratic Union's participation in a future cabinet to be
necessary. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

MDS PROTESTS SLOVAK CABINET'S PRIVATIZATION PROJECTS. The
Movement for a Democratic Slovakia on 12 October issued a
statement saying the cabinet of Premier Jozef Moravcik has
violated basic principles of morality and political ethics by
approving 12 privatization projects during its session the
previous day, TASR reports. The statement continues to say that
the political parties that form the Moravcik cabinet lost the
elections and failed to win the mandate from voters that would
have entitled them to make such decisions. It also noted that
ministers representing the Christian Democratic Movement and the
Party of the Democratic Left should realize that their
participation in this process can complicate the discussions
currently taking place on the formation of a new coalition
government. The press department of the Moravcik cabinet
responded by saying that the approval of these projects is in
full harmony with the cabinet's authority. The projects were all
given the go-ahead by the Privatization Ministry before the
election, but their approval was delayed during the election
campaign to avoid political misuse. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

AUDI FACTORY OPENS IN HUNGARY. The German Audi company on 12
October opened one of the world's most modern motor-assembling
factories in Gyor, northwestern Hungary, MTI reports. President
Arpad Goncz, Minister for Industry and Trade Laszlo Pal, Minister
of Environment and Regional Development Ferenc Baja, and
representatives of the Audi company were among the many guests
attending the inauguration ceremony. Audi chose Gyor as the site
of the factory from among 180 European locations. Audi management
council head Herbert Demel said that through the Gyor investment,
Audi has been able to gain a foothold in Central and Eastern
Europe, which is of strategic importance to the company. Audi has
invested 300 million German marks in the factory thus far and
plans to invest a further 430 million by the year 2000. The
factory will be capable of assembling 750 motors daily and
currently employs 200 people. -- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL Inc.

HOMELESS IN HUNGARY. The Hungarian Ministry of Welfare estimates
that 20,000-25,000 Hungarians are homeless, MTI reported on 11
October. Some 10,000 live in Budapest, where accommodations are
available for 2,000 and a further 500-600 can be given temporary
quarters. Some 60 percent of the hostels for the homeless are run
by Church and charity organizations. The Ministry of Welfare
spends 450 to 500 million forint annually on the destitute. --
Edith Oltay, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIAN DEFENSE MINISTER IN FRANCE. Romania's Defense Minister
Gheorghe Tinca on 12 October began an official visit to France at
the invitation of his French counterpart, Francois Leotard. In a
short interview with Radio Bucharest, Tinca said the visit was
aimed primarily at boosting Romanian-French cooperation in the
production of military equipment, including missiles and
helicopters. Meanwhile, Romania's Chief of Staff, General Dumitru
Cioflina, arrived on 11 October in Bonn to discuss ways to step
up cooperation between the Romanian and German armies, as well as
Romania's integration into Euro-Atlantic military structures. The
next day, he visited aviation and missiles units in Bavaria. --
Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVAN REBUFF TO ROMANIA OVER "LIMITED SOVEREIGNTY." Reacting
to Romania's recent red-carpet reception of Moldovan opposition
leaders who advocate unification with Romania, the ruling
Moldovan Agrarian Party's weekly Pamint si Oameni in its 3-10
October issue accused Romania of applying to Moldova the former
USSR's "limited sovereignty" doctrine. It said the recent series
of Romanian official statements challenging Moldova's choice of
independent statehood and Bucharest's open support for Moldova's
pro-Romanian opposition contradicted Romania's diplomatic
recognition of Moldova and was causing concern among the Moldovan
public. Irredentist pressures from Romania and the pro-Romanian
opposition in Chisinau risk triggering a pro-CIS backlash in
Moldova, the editorial said. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

"DNIESTER" LEADER HAILS RUSSIAN PAN-ORTHODOXISM. In an interview
with the Moscow "red-brown" weekly Zavtra (no. 38/1994),
"Dniester" leader Igor Smirnov, long known for his procommunist
views, praised the Orthodox religious ideology of tsarist Russia.
Declining the interviewer's oblique invitation to criticize
Yeltsin as a would-be "tsar" (but criticizing Moscow for "selling
out" the Baltics), Smirnov repeatedly credited the Russian empire
and its "holy Orthodox faith" with "uniting a multitude of
peoples and giving them the freedom to develop." He urged the
rebuilding of "just such a great power" based on Greater Russian
patriotism and orthodoxism. He also described the defense of the
"Dniester republic" as a cause of "both the communists and
monarchists." The interview was headlined "In Russia on the
Dniester, " reflecting the view that this part of Moldova
(situated 1,000 kilometers from Russia's border and where
Russians constitute only one quarter of the population) should
belong to a Greater Russia. Smirnov's statements follow a
flirtation by some of his procommunist supporters in Moscow with
conservative-nationalist and monarchist circles. -- Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

BULGARIAN PARLIAMENT PAVES WAY FOR EARLY ELECTIONS. International
agencies reported that by a vote of 162 to 40 with 10
abstentions, the Bulgarian parliament on 12 October rejected the
proposal by Dimitar Loudzhen, a former adviser to President
Zhelyu Zhelev and leader of the minor New Choice party, to form a
new government. Outgoing Prime Minister Lyuben Berov's
administration resigned on 2 September. Parliament Chairman
Alexander Yordan said the legislature's vote shows " a clear will
to disband" the government and comes in the wake of the
legislature's main parties' resolve not to form a working
government. Yordanov has called upon Zhelev to name an interim
cabinet and set an election date. Under the terms of the
Bulgarian Constitution, an election must now be held within two
months. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

ALBANIAN ORTHODOX LEADER ON THE WAY OUT. President Sali Berisha
has announced that the head of the Albanian Orthodox Church,
Metropolitan Anastasios Janulatos, a Greek citizen, will have to
step down under the country's new constitution, Rilindja reported
on 11 October. Berisha explained this would be simply a
"technical procedure," since Albania is a secular state and thus
the "role of the temporary archbishop" of the Albanian Orthodox
Church will end with the ratification of the new constitution.
Anastasios was ordained Archbishop of Tirana in June 1992 and
tasked with restoring the Albanian Autocephalous Church,
destroyed under communist rule. His appointment caused a big stir
in Albania. Berisha's statement on the bishop's forthcoming
termination of duty will be considered another anti-Greek affront
by Athens and will likely further upset the already poor
relations between Albania and Greece. -- Louis Zanga, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIAN CURRENCY DEVELOPMENTS. By a vote of 49 to 4 with 17
abstentions, the Seimas on 12 October amended the Lithuanian
Currency Law, passed in April, RFE/RL's Lithuanian Service
reports. The government was stripped of the authority to choose
the foreign currency to which the litas is pegged and set its
exchange value, giving these rights to the Bank of Lithuania. It
is hoped that the change will encourage foreigners to invest more
in Lithuania. The country's decision to peg the litas to the US
dollar from 1 April has allowed it to avoid the current problems
caused by the devaluation of the ruble. -- Saulius Girnius,
RFE/RL Inc.

PARLIAMENT DISCUSSES ESTONIAN PREMIER-DESIGNATE. Bank of Estonia
President Siim Kallas on 13 October will present to the
parliament his political program and the criteria according to
which he will choose his cabinet, BNS reported on 12 October. The
parliament will then vote on his nomination as prime minister.
The Pro Patria, Estonian National Independence Party, and Liberal
Party factions as well as five Rural Centrist Party members have
announced their support for Kallas. The Assembly Party, Rural
Union, Rightist, and Royalist factions have already stated their
opposition to him. Pro Patria faction chairman Tiit Sinissaar
said Kallas is likely to gain confirmation with 40-45 votes,
since some of the parliament's 101 deputies are not expected to
vote. If the parliament does not approve Kallas, President Mart
Laar will name another candidate. If the parliament rejects him,
it will try to find another suitable candidate. And should this
fail, new parliament elections will be called. -- Saulius
Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

LATVIA AND KYRGYZSTAN AGREE ON ECONOMIC COOPERATION. Latvian
Economics Ministers Janis Zvanitajs and Kyrgyz Industry Minister
Andrei Iordan signed in Bishkek on 12 October an agreement on
trade and economic cooperation principles, Interfax reported. The
ministers told journalists that the document lays the foundation
for long-term economic cooperation between the two countries and
that specific trade accords will be signed separately at some
future date. Zvanitajs also expressed hope that, since the two
countries' currencies are stable, the som will become convertible
in Latvia soon. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

SITUATION OF LATVIAN DEFENSE FORCES. In the case of an armed
attack, the Latvian Defense Forces and the Home Guard would be
able to defend the country, National Armed Forces Commander Juris
Dalbins told the press on 12 October, BNS reported. He conceded,
however, that the capabilities of these forces are limited on
account of scant technical provisions and insufficient training
programs. Commenting on separate groups of the Armed Forces,
Dalbins said the National Air Force "practically existed only on
paper," the Navy is "in normal condition," and the land forces
need to be reorganized. Dalbins did not touch on the need to
reorganize the command structure of the armed forces to ensure
clear lines of command. Diena on 11 October described the current
situation as "confusion in the leadership of Latvia's military
structures" and attributed the problems to contradictions in the
existing laws on defense matters. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Penny Morvant and Jan Cleave)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU
Inquiries about specific news items should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912
Fax: (202) 457-6992
Internet: REEDB@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole