If we are to live together in peace, we must first come to know each other better. - Lyndon B. Johnson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 193, 11 October 1994

                             RUSSIA

DIPLOMATS: RUSSIA MAY DROP RADICAL CSCE PLAN. On 10 October
Reuters, reporting on the opening session of the Budapest CSCE
review conference, said that Russia might drop its radical plan
to reorganize the CSCE into a mini-UN for Europe. Chief Russian
delegate Yurii Ushakov, however, accused opponents of the plan of
harboring a "cold war" mentality, an RFE/RL correspondent
reported. In June the Russians had proposed that NATO, the
would-be collective security organization of the CIS, and other
European security organizations should be "coordinated by" the
CSCE. The CSCE would have its own, UN-style security council,
with Russia as a member. Not only NATO but also some former
Warsaw Pact states oppose the plan. The US delegate to the
Budapest meeting was quoted as saying that the plan was not
acceptable to the United States, and several other delegates
spoke out against any radical reform of the CSCE. Since unanimity
is required on any decision, the Russian plan has no hope of
acceptance. -- Doug Clarke and Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

CHECHEN LEADERSHIP READY FOR TALKS WITH RUSSIA. On 10 October
Interfax quoted Chechen Interior Minister Shamseddin Yusef as
affirming that the Chechen leadership was ready to embark on
talks with the Russian leadership, provided that Moscow did not
interfere in Chechnya's internal affairs; he also said that the
Chechen leadership had rejected offers of support from various
Muslim states, including Afghanistan, which had offered to send
one million mudjahedin to Chechnya. On the same day, a group of
Chechen parliamentarians arrived in Moscow for talks with State
Duma chairman Ivan Rybkin. Meanwhile, ITAR-TASS reported that
Chechen Deputy Prime Minister Husein Ferzauli had met in Ankara
with the chairman of Turkey's opposition Motherland Party, Mesut
Yilmaz, who expressed concern over Russia's Caucasus policy. --
Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

RUBLE PLUNGES AGAINST DOLLAR. On 10 October the ruble fell by
6.4% against the dollar, its steepest one-day dive since January.
On the Moscow Interbank Currency Exchange the ruble closed at
3,081 to the dollar, down from 2,896 on Friday, 7 October,
Western agencies reported. Since 22 September, when the Russian
Central Bank stopped intervening to prop up the ruble, it has
fallen by more than 27%. In an attempt to calm markets, acting
Finance Minister Sergei Dubinin said the fall was not caused by
economic conditions and did not presage a sharp rise in
inflation. Bankers and economists warned, however, that the drop
in the ruble would result in an increase in inflation and the
budget deficit. -- Penny Morvant, RFE/RL Inc.

TAX MAN THREATENS OFFICER RETRAINING. Colonel General Yurii
Rodionov, deputy chairman of the parliament's Defense Committee,
told Interfax on 10 October that the Russian tax services were
threatening the social programs for military officers withdrawn
from Germany. Rodionov said there were ten training centers in
Russia completely financed and equipped by the German government.
In the summer, he added, the tax authorities had started
demanding that these centers pay taxes and had even seized the
accounts of training centers and the organizations building
houses for the returnees. He explained that the State Duma had
passed a law freeing these institutions from taxation, but the
Federation Council had not. Rodionov hoped that the Duma version
would soon be approved by a conference committee. -- Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL Inc.

BRAZIL TO BUY RUSSIAN TANKS. Brazilian defense officials signed
on 10 October a letter of intent to buy 300 T-72 tanks from the
Omsk Transport Machine-building Factory in Western Siberia. The
tanks will be sold for $1.2 million each, but Interfax reported
that the two sides still had to agree on the means of payment
before a contract could be signed. The Brazilians have proposed a
barter deal, while the Russians want hard currency. -- Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

SPACE FORCES USE UKRAINIAN-BUILT BOOSTER AND SATELLITE. Interfax
on 10 October reported that the Space Forces intended to launch
an Okean-01 weather satellite the next day from the Plesetsk
cosmodrome using a Tsiklon-3 booster. A workhorse for the Soviet
space program, the Tsiklon-3 failed in its last launch attempt on
25 May 1994. The Tsiklon-3 is a civilian version of the R-36
(SS-9) intercontinental ballistic missile. Both it and the Okean
satellite were designed and built at Ukraine's Southern
Machine-building Plant (Pivdenmash) in Dnipropetrovsk. -- Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

CHANGE OF LEADERSHIP AT POPULAR NEWSPAPER. Vladislav Fronin
resigned on 6 October as chief editor of the leading proreform
daily Komsomolskaya pravda, a post he had held since 1988, and as
chairman of the Komsomolskaya Pravda joint-stock company,
according to a report published in Komsomolskaya pravda on the
following day. Valerii Simonov, hitherto Fronin's deputy, was
elected chief editor, while Vladimir Sungorkin replaced Fronin as
company chairman. Fronin is working on the establishment of a
Komsomolskaya Pravda publishing house. -- Julia Wishnevsky,
RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN AGREES TO TAKE OVER FORMER GOVERNMENT DAILY. On 5 October
Rossiiskaya gazeta published the text of a presidential directive
transferring Rossiiskie vesti from the government--a change
requested by the newspaper's editorial staff--to staff and the
President's Administration. Rossiiskie vesti was founded in 1990
by the Russian Supreme Soviet, then chaired by Yeltsin. Soon
after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the appointment of the
reformist government of Egor Gaidar in December 1991, it was
reregistered as a government newspaper. (Rossiiskaya gazeta
continued as the organ of the parliament until the latter was
dissolved by Yeltsin's decree of 21 September 1993.) When Viktor
Chernomyrdin took over the leadership of the government in March
1993, the staff of Rossiiskie vesti remained loyal to the Gaidar
team, finding it difficult to support the policies of the new
prime minister. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

                 TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

BREAD SHORTAGE IN DUSHANBE RESULTS IN DISTURBANCES. Russian and
Western news agencies reported on 10 October that bread shortages
in Tajikistan's capital had become so severe that fights at bread
shops had become common. On 9 October a Dushanbe woman was shot
dead and another was wounded when an officer of the Ministry of
National Security fired on people waiting to buy bread, the only
food product that most inhabitants of Dushanbe can afford. The
previous day a militia officer had killed a man selling bread
from a truck. ITAR-TASS noted that a recent decree of the
presidium of Tajikistan's Supreme Soviet making speculation in
bread a criminal offense had merely driven illegal traders
underground and forced prices up. Government officials traced the
shortage to a lack of fuel for transport, but others point to a
lack of flour. On 9 October Uzbekistan shipped some flour to
Tajikistan, but the amount was reported to be sufficient for only
two weeks. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

FURTHER ECONOMIC WOES OF TAJIKISTAN. Tajikistan's industrial
production is paralyzed because of a lack of materials and
Russian rubles, Russian TV reported on 9 October; the following
day, Tajik head of state Imomali Rakhmonov complained to
journalists that his country's economic situation was being hurt
by the obstacles put up to prevent its joining the ruble zone,
Interfax reported. Some Russian financial officials have been
wary of taking on responsibility for the collapsed economy of
Tajikistan. In Rakhmonov's opinion, 15 trillion rubles will be
needed to restore the economy of the Central Asian state.
According to the Russian TV report, the Tajik government has been
able to pay wages only three times in 1994. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL
Inc.

GEORGIAN WARLORD CREATES OWN POLITICAL PARTY. Looking ahead to
the parliamentary elections due in 1995, Georgian warlord Dzhaba
Ioseliani has announced the creation of a political party named
"Elections" that "opposes all existing political groupings in
Georgia," according to ITAR-TASS of 8 October and AFP of 10
October. Ioseliani was quoted by ITAR-TASS as stating that
"Elections" is seeking as potential candidates talented and
honest individuals who at present remain outside domestic
politics. In his regular Monday radio interview on 10 October,
Georgian parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze argued that the
institution of president, abolished in 1992 after the ouster of
the incumbent (with Ioseliani's help), should be restored,
Interfax reported. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

RUSSIA WANTS STRINGS ATTACHED TO WESTERN CREDITS TO CIS STATES.
Returning from the Madrid meeting of the IMF, World Bank, and
EBRD, where Russia was granted major debt relief, Deputy Prime
Minister Aleksandr Shokhin declared that Western credits to CIS
member states should be linked to the repayment of these states'
debts to Moscow. Russia "welcomes Western credits to CIS
countries as long as these pay their debts to Russia with these
funds," Interfax quoted Shokhin on 6 and 7 October as telling a
news conference. He also implied that the issue could affect
Russia's ability to repay its Western creditors in the future. --
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIAN GEOPOLITICAL AGENDA AT CSCE. Preliminary discussions at
the Budapest CSCE meeting (see above) highlighted further
differences between Russia and most other members over security
issues related to the ex-Soviet area and Eastern Europe. Russia
seeks political recognition and financial support for its
peacekeeping operations in the CIS area, but many other countries
insist on close monitoring of and specific time limits for the
operation, its rigorous impartiality, and accompanying political
negotiations under CSCE auspices, none of which Moscow accepts.
Russia is being criticized at the CSCE for undermining the
latter's efforts to bring peace to Karabakh. Controversy is also
expected over Russia's renewed demands to revise to its advantage
the flank sublimits for the Caucasus and the northwestern theater
in the treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe. Moscow's
last-minute proposal to lift the suspension of the rump
Yugoslavia from the CSCE is likely to spell further controversy.
-- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA AND BELARUS TO COORDINATE BORDER DEFENSE? The commanders
of Russian and Belarus Border Troops, Colonel General Andrei
Nikolaev and Colonel Vasilii Morkovkin, signed on 7 October in
Minsk a protocol on expanding bilateral cooperation on border
defense, Interfax reported. They agreed to "coordinate actions"
of the border troops on Russia's and Belarus' borders with
Ukraine and to hold joint exercises on the defense of "joint
sections" of their borders with Poland, Latvia, and Lithuania.
Moreover, they agreed to create working groups at the chief of
staff level to work out by 30 October a concept for "a single
regime for the defense of Russia's and Belarus' borders" with
Poland, Latvia, and Lithuania (i.e., non-CIS states). -- Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIAN CREDITS FOR ARMENIA. Speaking in Erevan on 10 October at
the beginning of an official visit to Armenia, the chairman of
the Russian Federation Council, Vladimir Shumeiko, announced that
Russia would grant Armenia 110 billion rubles credit as the first
installment of an aid package; of this, 60 billion rubles are
earmarked for reconstruction of Armenia's mothballed nuclear
power station. (Russia had previously offered technical
assistance with this project provided that Armenia footed the
bill.) At a meeting with Armenian parliamentarians, Shumeiko
characterized relations between the two countries as developing
"quite successfully and fruitfully," Interfax reported. Shumeiko
and Armenian Prime Minister Hrant Bagratyan agreed on the need to
widen economic cooperation between the two countries,
particularly in the field of advanced technology. -- Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL Inc.

                   CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN UPDATE. UN commander General Sir Michael Rose has written
to both the Serb and Bosnian government sides to demand an end to
their renewed sniper activity, which he called "a serious threat
to the civilian population," AFP reported on 10 October. The BBC
added that Serb forces continue to block most relief convoys. The
Times on 11 October reports on the successful efforts of Turkish
peace-keepers to win the confidence of the Croats of Podbrezje,
near Zenica, in central Bosnia. The Turks helped the Croats
repair and restore the Catholic church that had been desecrated
by Islamic volunteer fighters from the Middle East, who number in
the hundreds in Bosnia and Herzegovina. The guerrillas challenged
the Turks, but a Turkish officer recalled "there were [then] some
very strict measures undertaken by our commanding officer. Let us
say they involved a very heavy armored patrol. The mujahadin do
not bother us any more." -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

SERBIAN CROWN PRINCE CRITICIZES BORDERS AND BLOCKADES BETWEEN
SERBS. Borba on 11 October reports on the speech by Crown Prince
Aleksandar Karadjordjevic marking the 60th anniversary of the
assassination of King Aleksandar I Karadjordjevic, who was gunned
down in Marseilles by a Macedonian terrorist working with
Croatian extremists. The prince praised the late monarch and
recalled his historic role in the wake of World War I as the
unifier "of all Serbs and other Yugoslavs." Alluding to
present-day affairs and the ongoing feud between Serbian
President Slobodan Milosevic and Bosnian Serb leaders, the prince
said "it is completely natural that we [Serbs] again seek to be
united and that there be no borders among us, to say nothing of a
blockade by one Serb state against another." Monarchy has deep
roots in Serbian culture, and many observers both inside Serbia
and abroad have suggested that the British-born Aleksandar could
offer a dignified alternative to the current Serbian political
scene, which is saturated with ex-Communists and shadowy
elements. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

RUMP YUGOSLAV PRESIDENT IN ATHENS. Zoran Lilic, speaking to the
Greek news agency ANA on 10 October, said Belgrade's relations
with Albania had hit a nadir, largely owing to what he described
as Tirana's poor record on human rights issues. He suggested that
relations with Macedonia were strained and that Macedonia had
mistreated its ethnic Serbian minority. Lilic also expressed
satisfaction at the international community's easing of sanctions
against the rump Yugoslavia. -- Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

SERBIAN, RUSSIAN ORTHODOX CHURCHES ISSUE STATEMENT ON PEACE.
International media reported on 10 October that the Serbian and
Russian Orthodox Churches have issued a joint statement calling
for talks to resume on establishing peace throughout the former
Yugoslavia. The document, issued in Moscow at the end of a visit
there by Serbian Orthodox Church officials, states that "a just
peace must offer the Serbs, the Croats, and the Muslims a fair
chance to set up their own states and societies." -- Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

TRIAL OF MUSLIMS IN SANDZAK. In the Montenegrin town of Bijelo
Polje, the trial continues of the leader of the ethnic Muslim
Party for Democratic Action (SDA), Harun Hadzic, and other party
members, including Hakija Muratovic. Borba on 11 October quotes
Muratovic as calling the trial "skillfully rigged" and "aimed at
destroying the SDA." He added that the "entire Muslim nation" in
rump Yugoslavia is on trial. Borba reported on 7 October that
Hadzic has denied charges of plotting an armed uprising and
claims a Muslim military does not exist. He also argues that no
one in the party has signed a Sandzak constitution and that the
1993 memorandum for an independent Sandzak was simply the basis
for negotiations with the Montenegrin and Serbian authorities.
The document called for setting up a joint parliament for the
Serbian and Montenegrin halves of Sandzak, which combined have a
narrow Muslim majority, and for establishing various other
institutions that would lay the foundations for a state. Hadzic
added that weapons found in police raids were bought by the SDA
out of fear for members' safety after anonymous threats. Earlier
this year the Humanitarian Law Fund published a report saying
police forced ethnic Muslims to buy guns and then ordered them to
hand the weapons over as sham "evidence." -- Fabian Schmidt,
RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH MILITARY CONFLICT SHARPENS. In a dispute over control of
the military, President Lech Walesa has asked Defense Minister
Piotr Kolodziejczyk to resign. But the minister has refused to do
so, at least for the time being. Gazeta Wyborcza reported on 11
October that Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak told Kolodziejczyk to
"maintain his cool." Parliamentary leaders of the leading
political parties told Rzeczpospolita the same day that their
groups would support Kolodziejczyk in the dispute with the
president. They also demanded that high-ranking officers who had
followed Walesa's lead in criticizing the minister be
disciplined. The internal conflict within the military has
already become a major political problem, threatening to
undermine the authority of the president and severely affecting
the military as a whole. -- Jan de Weydenthal, RFE/RL Inc.

ANOTHER GERMAN TOURIST SHOT BY CZECH POLICE. A Czech policeman on
9 October shot and seriously wounded a German tourist near the
town of Pribram, Czech and German agencies report. Some witnesses
say the tourist attacked the policeman while being questioned
about a traffic violation; others have testified that the attack
by the policeman and the subsequent accidental shot was
unprovoked. The policeman has been suspended and is under
investigation. Czech police in September shot and killed a German
tourist who reportedly failed to stop his car when signaled to do
so by a police patrol. The German Embassy in Prague expressed
"alarm" over the two incidents and appealed to the Czech Ministry
of Foreign Affairs to clarify the latest shooting. Czech Internal
Affairs Minister Jan Ruml on 10 October expressed regret over the
incident. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

"BOHEMIAE 1994" IN PRAGUE. President Vaclav Havel opened in
Prague on 9 October the major three-day conference "Bohemiae
1994." Prominent Western and Czech economists and public figures
are attending the conference, which is modeled on the Davos
Forum. Addressing the conference, Czech Industry and Trade
Minister Vladimir Dlouhy said on 10 October that the annual
inflation rate in the Czech Republic is not expected to exceed
10% in 1994. He challenged Ronald Freeman, the vice president of
the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, who had
argued that the Czech Republic should export more to the East
rather than rely on exports to the West. Freeman's recommendation
was also rejected by the Harvard economist Jeffrey Sachs, CTK
reported. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAKIA'S REFERENDUM CAMPAIGN GETS UNDER WAY. The radio and
television campaign for Slovakia's first referendum kicked off on
10 October, but no political party has shown an interest in
participating, TASR reports. The referendum, to be held on 22
October, asks the question "Do you agree that a law proving the
sources of money used in privatization should be passed?" The
Democratic Union, Christian Democratic Movement, and Hungarian
coalition have all questioned the need for such a referendum,
particularly because it could be used retroactively. Meanwhile,
if such a referendum is passed, it will not require that a
parliamentary law be approved, since the constitution stipulates
that deputies should vote according to their conscience. --
Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

PARTY OF THE DEMOCRATIC LEFT ON SPLIT, NEW CABINET. PDL Deputy
Chairman Milan Ftacnik assured journalists on 10 October that his
party will not split, saying such a move would make no sense with
local elections approaching, TASR reports. The party's
disappointing showing in Slovakia's recent parliamentary
elections has triggered growing speculation that a split is
imminent, particularly in light of the Republican Council session
scheduled for 15 October, at which possible leadership changes
are to be discussed. PDL Deputy Chairman Alzbeta Borzova denied a
recent CTK report saying that Chairman Peter Weiss and other
party leaders have offered to resign. Weiss said his party's
closest ally is the Association of Slovak Workers, which was
established within the framework of the PDL. He has also said
that it is "highly improbable" that a coalition with the
Hungarian parties can be created since it would require ASW
support and important changes to the Hungarian coalition's
current program, Sme reported on 8 October. -- Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN FOREIGN MINISTER ADDRESSES CSCE CONFERENCE. Addressing
the CSCE conference in Budapest on 10 October, Laszlo Kovacs
warned there is a "security hiatus" in Europe and that numerous
countries, especially in Central and Eastern Europe, feel
insecure, MTI reports. He argued this poses new dangers and
upgrades the role of the CSCE as the only pan-European
organization. Kovacs went on to say that since the CSCE lacked
the means to act as the sole guarantor of European security, a
comprehensive defense structure must be established that provides
a forum for all countries unable to join Western security
institutions in the foreseeable future. -- Edith Oltay, RFE/RL
Inc.

CANADA TO ABOLISH VISA REQUIREMENT FOR HUNGARIANS. MTI and
Western news agencies reported on 10 October that Canada will
abolish visa requirements for Hungarians beginning 1 November.
Canadian Minister for Citizenship and Immigration Sergio Marchi
said Hungary will be the first East European country whose
citizens will not need visas. Marchi told reporters in Budapest:
"For my government, the necessity that Hungarians obtain visas is
a hangover from your country's pre-democratic days." Canadians
have been able to travel to Hungary without a visa since 1990. --
Edith Oltay, RFE/RL Inc.

NAVAL EXERCISE IN ROMANIA. A three-day naval exercise ended in
Romania on 10 October, Radio Bucharest and Western agencies
reported. The exercise, known as "Pontica '94," took place off
the Romanian Black Sea coast. Observers from 11 Western and
Balkan countries, plus NATO, watched the maneuvers, which ended
with a mock battle at Cap Midia in which Romanian troops repelled
an imaginary attempt by enemy forces to land on the Romanian
shore. Later in October, Romania will join other Black Sea
countries in a multinational naval exercise in line with NATO's
Partnership for Peace program. -- Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL Inc.

FIVE KILLED IN SOUTHEASTERN BULGARIA. Five people were killed and
nine others injured in a blast at a thermal power plant on 10
October, RFE/RL's Bulgarian Service reported the same day. The
incident took place in the village of Galabavo, some 250
kilometers from Sofia. The cause of the explosion is unknown. --
Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

BERISHA REJECTS APPEAL TO "TRADE IN OUR CITIZENS." News agencies
reported from Tirana on 10 October that Albanian President Sali
Berisha has rejected Greek appeals to release five ethnic Greeks
convicted of espionage and illegal possession of weapons. He also
refused to deport the five to Greece, saying Tirana will not use
"the methods of Brezhnev" in dealing with such cases. Athens
suggested that the five be freed and sent to Greece, but Berisha
said this would cast doubt on the "sovereignty of Albanian
institutions." -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVAN PROTESTS IN BENDERY. Following several ultimatums, some
100 parents of Moldovan schoolchildren from the right-bank city
of Bendery, controlled by the left-bank "Dniester republic,"
blocked the railroad just outside the city on 10 October to
protest the "Dniester" ban on the Roman alphabet. Blockading the
Bendery junction, which handles almost all rail transport between
Moldova and the CIS states, can inflict heavy economic losses on
Moldova--as was the case in 1991 when Russian communist women
obstructed rail traffic at the same junction. Senior Moldovan
officials and the police managed to persuade the Moldovan parents
to stop their protest after several hours, but the parents
threatened to resume the blockade in a few days unless Tiraspol
lifts the alphabet ban. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

CORRESPONDENT BEATEN IN TIRASPOL. Anatolii Holodiuk, an RFE/RL
and Basapress correspondent in Tiraspol, was beaten up outside
the city's House of Soviets by a major from the Security Ministry
of the "Dniester republic," Basapress reported on 10 October. The
correspondent had been threatened most recently on 8 October by
uniformed security agents for his reporting, particularly on the
school protests. The victim telephoned the Security Ministry to
complain about the attack but was rebuffed by the minister. --
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

CALL FOR CLOSER LITHUANIAN-UKRAINIAN RELATIONS. Lithuanian Seimas
Deputy Chairman Juozas Bernatonis and Defense Minister Linas
Linkevicius participated in the ceremonies in Kiev commemorating
the 50th anniversary of Ukraine's liberation from Nazi
occupation, Radio Lithuania reported on 10 October. In talks with
Ukrainian Parliament Chairman Oleksandr Moroz on 7 October,
Bernatonis noted that Lithuania was interested in restoring close
relations between the two countries. These ties decreased after
Lithuania and Ukraine regained independence. Bernatonis said the
process of restoring close relations should be aided by the
planned visit to Ukraine in late October by Seimas Chairman
Ceslovas Jursenas. The two leaders expressed the view that their
countries should also cooperate in creating a legal basis for
market reforms. -- Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIAN FRIGATE IN NATO MANEUVERS. The "Zemaitis" returned to
Klaipeda on 10 October after participating in the 10-day NATO
exercise "Cooperative Venture 94" in the North Sea off the coast
of Norway, Lithuania Radio reports. This was the first time that
Lithuania took part in naval Partnership for Peace maneuvers.
Lithuanian armed forces commander in chief General Jonas
Andriskevicius, who observed the training operations, noted that
the ship successfully completed all its tasks and its performance
differed little from that of other vessels. -- Saulius Girnius,
RFE/RL Inc.

NATIONAL BANK PRESIDENT NOMINATED FOR ESTONIAN PREMIERSHIP.
Estonian President Lennart Meri has nominated Siim Kallas,
president of the Bank of Estonia, as prime minister and asked him
to form a new government, BNS reported on 10 October. The prime
minister-designate must submit his program to the parliament
within 14 days. If the program is approved, he has 7 days to
present the new government to the president, who then appoints a
new cabinet within three days. Kallas was born in Tallinn in 1948
and graduated with honors from Tartu University in 1972, where he
majored in economics. He co-authored the program for Estonian
economic autonomy and the 1992 monetary reform. Also in 1992, he
was appointed president of the Bank of Estonia's president. --
Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

UPDATE ON PALDISKI AND SKRUNDA BASES. Russian specialists have
removed the fuel rod from the second nuclear reactor at the
former Soviet submarine base in Paldiski, Estonia, BNS reported
on 10 October. Estonian officials reported that the procedure
went smoothly. Russian experts opened up the newest, 90-megawatt
reactor in August and the older, 70-megawatt reactor in
September. The nuclear fuel rods from both reactors will be taken
to Krasnoyarsk, Russia, later this month. Under the
Estonian-Russian agreement on decommissioning the Paldiski naval
base, the two reactors have to be completely dismantled by the
end of September 1995. Meanwhile, specialists from the US Defense
Department and the US Controlled Demolition Inc. are due to
arrive in Latvia this week to prepare for the dismantling of the
unfinished block at the Skrunda early-warning radar station.
Latvia took over the unfinished part of the radar facilities
after it signed accords on the withdrawal of Russian troops on 30
April. The United States has committed up to $7 million to assist
with the dismantling process. According to the Latvian-Russian
accords, Russia will continue to operate the station for another
four years or so. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Penny Morvant and Jan Cleave)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
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