If you're sure you understand everthing that is going on, you're hopelessly confused. - Walter Mondale
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 185, 28 September 1994

                              RUSSIA

FIRST DAY OF US-RUSSIAN SUMMIT FOCUSES ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS. The
first day of summit talks between US President Bill Clinton and
Russian President Boris Yeltsin focused on foreign policy and
security issues, including peace efforts in Bosnia and
Nagorno-Karabakh, Western agencies reported on 27 September. A US
official who asked not to be identified told correspondents that
the first day's sessions had been "very positive." Other reports
indicated that the talks had been friendly, with some unspecified
disagreements. While the two presidents conducted their partly
private discussions, the Russian foreign and defense ministers met
with their US counterparts to discuss Ukraine and Moldova. -- Bess
Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

ARBATOV, KORTUNOV ON YELTSIN'S UN SPEECH. Aleksei Arbatov, a
Russian defense intellectual and State Duma deputy, told a Moscow
briefing on 27 September that Yeltsin's UN speech the previous day
had marked the return of the country's foreign policy to former
Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev's "new thinking." He cautioned
that speeches and summit declarations, however, were not the same
as pursuing a policy, though "many people in the president's
administration think so." Andrei Kortunov of the US and Canada
Institute said at the same briefing that he had helped to write
Yeltsin's speech. Yet he criticized it for proposing a "START-3"
before START-1 had been implemented or START-2 ratified by the
Russian parliament. Interfax reported on the briefing. -- Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN ADVISER: "NATO'S TIME IS OVER." "NATO's time is over,"
Yeltsin's adviser on security matters Yurii Baturin has claimed,
according to Ostankino TV news of 27 September. He was elaborating
on Yeltsin's appeal in his address to the UN General Assembly the
previous day for "a new mechanism of international power" under
the aegis of the UN. According to the Russian president, such new
structures would replace those established during the cold war
when the world was bipolar. The statements of both Yeltsin and his
aide seem to indicate Russia's concern over the role of the US as
the world's only superpower and what they view as attempts by the
West to enlarge NATO by letting former Soviet satellite states of
Eastern Europe join that organization. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL
Inc.

BURBULIS CALLS FOR YELTSIN'S "HONORABLE" RESIGNATION. The
communist daily Pravda of 27 September quoted Gennadii Burbulis,
once Yeltsin's right-hand man, as calling for the president's
"honorable resignation." According to the newspaper, Burbulis told
a news conference in Omsk that the country needed a new generation
of managers and that Yeltsin had failed to create a team of
reform-minded professionals. "I deem it necessary to help Yeltsin
put an honorable end to his tenure as president," Pravda quoted
Burbulis as saying. He reportedly added that Yeltsin needed
assistance to "leave the game with dignity" and wished him "a good
successor." -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

THE ALLEGED SPLIT IN YELTSIN'S ENTOURAGE. The exclusion from
Yeltsin's delegation to the US of a number of his top
aides--including the president's chief spokesman, Vyacheslav
Kostikov, his foreign policy adviser Dmitrii Ryurikov, and his
speechwriter Lyudmila Pikhoya (see the Daily Report of 26
September)--has aroused much speculation in the Russian media.
Diverse democratic newspapers such as Izvestiya, Moskovsky
komsomolets, and Moscow News commented on the event on 27
September; and the popular Russian TV observer Nikolai Svanidze
opened that day's "Podrobnosti" with a reference to the rumors.
Journalists have been offering two kinds of explanations. While
the more serious newspapers such as Izvestiya attribute the fact
to serious political disagreements between more liberal and more
conservative aides of Yeltsin, others have claimed that the three
had protested against the president's behavior during his recent
visit to Germany (such as his attempt to conduct a German military
orchestra and to sing a Russian folk song) and had been left
behind in response, according to Svanidze. -- Julia Wishnevsky,
RFE/RL Inc.

RYBKIN MEETS GORBACHEV. At a meeting with the speaker of the State
Duma, Ivan Rybkin, Gorbachev welcomed the establishment in Russia
of the new Russian Social Democratic Party, the former told
Interfax on 27 September. According to Rybkin, the reason for
their meeting was the desire of the former president to express
his gratitude for the recent increase in his pension from 4,000 to
more than 800,000 rubles--however belated the move might have
been, Rybkin added. Rybkin denied having witnessed any evidence
that Gorbachev had fallen out with his former top associate
Aleksandr Yakovlev, who is the chairman of the new party's
organizational committee. Even if there were differences between
them, the two men were too sharp and experienced politicians to
reveal these, Rybkin explained. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

CHECHNYA DEVELOPMENTS. According to Ostankino TV news of 27
September, the united forces of the Chechen opposition have
encountered difficulty in resisting attacks by troops loyal to the
republic's president, Dzhokhar Dudaev, near the villages of
Bratskoe and Znamenskoe. Other sources, though, had claimed that
the fighting between the president, who is seeking Chechnya's
independence from Russia, and the opposition had already
approached the outskirts of the capital, Grozny, the Ostankino
news presenter added. On the same day Russian TV newscasts cited
the Russian authorities as saying that they would not allow Dudaev
to continue killing innocent citizens of Chechnya. Meanwhile,
Russian railway services have been rescheduled so that trains can
avoid entering Chechnya while traveling from Dagestan to the north
of Russia, the newscasts reported. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL
Inc.

CHEMICAL WEAPONS STORAGE SITES DISCLOSED. Aleksandr Piskunov, the
deputy chairman of the State Duma's Defense Committee, detailed
the size and location of Russia's chemical weapons stockpile in a
26 September interview with Interfax. The declared 40,000 metric
tons of chemical weapons agents, he said, were stored in seven
locations. The largest (7,520 tons) was in the town of Pochep in
southwestern Russia near the borders with Belarus and Ukraine.
Just under 7,000 tons were stored in the settlement of
Maradykovsky in Kirov Oblast east of Moscow and a similar amount
in the settlement of Leonidovka, Penza Oblast. Tiny Urdmurtia had
just over 12,000 tons in two storage sites: Kambarka in the east
and Kizner in the west. Gorny, some 200 kilometers east of
Saratov, had 1,160 tons. The only storage site east of the Urals
was at Shchuche (5,440 tons), just east of Chelyabinsk. Piskunov
announced that the committee intended to hold hearings on the
plans to destroy these stockpiles. He complained that not a single
bill on chemical disarmament had been tabled in the Duma, nor had
the 1993 international convention on chemical weapons yet been
submitted for ratification. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

RUSSIAN-GEORGIAN AGREEMENT ON RETURN OF MESKHETIANS. A delegation
from Russia's Ministry for Nationality Affairs has signed a
protocol with Georgian officials on cooperation in solving the
problem of the return of Meskhetian Turks and others from Russia
to Georgia, ITAR-TASS reported from Tbilisi on 27 September. The
Meskhetians were deported in 1944 from their homelands on the
Georgian-Turkish border. Many were resettled in Central Asia;
after a massacre of Meskhetians in the Fergana Valley in 1989, a
large number emigrated to Russia, but they hoped to be able to
return to Georgia. The Georgian authorities were, however,
reluctant to agree to the Meskhetians' return. The agreement with
the Russian delegation indicates a change in Georgian policy. --
Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

DISPUTE OVER DEATH OF DISSIDENT CLERGYMAN IN TAJIKISTAN. The
former imam-khatib of the mosque in Kurgan-Tyube, Sayid Ashraf,
was found dead shortly after his return to the city in the wake of
his release from prison on 21 September, Interfax reported. Ashraf
had been jailed in 1993 for antigovernment activity. The Tajik
opposition insists that he was killed; but First Deputy Chairman
of the Supreme Soviet Abdulmajid Dostiev told Interfax that Ashraf
had suffered a heart attack. Ashraf was one of the beneficiaries
of an amnesty demanded by the opposition as a precondition to
further peace talks with the government. Dostiev expressed concern
that Ashraf's death could interfere with the implementation of a
recent cease-fire agreement between the Tajik government and the
opposition. A Western news agency quotes Human Rights Watch as
asserting that Ashraf died in prison. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

PROMINENT AMERICANS ON RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN RELATIONS. The
Ukrainian-US Consultative Committee--which includes Zbigniew
Brzezinski, Henry Kissinger, and George Soros--convened in Kiev
for a regular half-yearly meeting, Interfax and Radio Ukraine
reported on 25 and 26 September, respectively. At a news
conference Brzezinski noted that Ukraine's independence was
important for "transforming Russia from an imperial state into a
normal one." Russia might be strong enough to "swallow"
neighboring countries, including Ukraine, but it would not be
strong enough to digest them, Brzezinski was quoted as saying.
Kissinger pointed out that for Russia to remain within its present
borders was a prerequisite for developing US-Russian relations.
Moreover, the transformation of the CIS into a new Union (as has
sometimes been suggested by Russian officials) would not be in the
interest of the US, Kissinger said. The group's communique
stressed that "a strong Ukraine is a guarantee of stability and
security in Europe." -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

HUNDREDS PERISH IN ESTONIAN FERRY DISASTER. Early in the morning
of 28 September, the ferry "Estonia" sank in a storm off the
southwest Finnish island of Uto with 679 passengers and 188 crew
members on board, Western agencies report. The ferry, which was on
its way from Tallinn to Stockholm, sank very quickly--some reports
say in less than five minutes--with winds exceeding 90 kilometers
per hour and waves topping nearly 20 feet. There is no official
explanation as to why the German-built ferry sank. Five ferries
and 20 helicopters rescued about 90 people, but there is little
hope of finding other survivors because of very low water
temperatures. President Lennart Meri has declared a day of
mourning and formed an independent government commission, headed
by Transport Minister Andi Meister, to investigate what appears to
be the worst peacetime ferry disaster in European waters. --
Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL Inc.

IZETBEGOVIC SLAMS UN ARMS POLICY. Addressing the UN General
Assembly, Bosnian President Alija Izetbegovic said "the free world
neither supported nor defended freedom" in the face of
Serbian-sponsored aggression against his embattled republic,
international media reported on 27 and 28 September. He added that
"justice has turned into injustice because the aggressor had
weapons--which had been stockpiled over 40 years time--while the
victim was unarmed, and its hands were kept tied." The latter
reference was presumably to the UN arms embargo, which many in the
US Congress want to see lifted next month. Under apparent pressure
from its British, French, and Russian partners in the Contact
Group, however, the Clinton administration has agreed to a
compromise that would delay the lifting of the embargo for at
least six months. The Bosnian government, which earlier received a
US pledge of increased economic aid, reluctantly agreed. The UN
commander in Bosnia, General Sir Michael Rose, called the delay
"tremendous news." -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

TUDJMAN ADDRESSES SECURITY COUNCIL. Vecernji list reported on 28
September that Croatian President Franjo Tudjman spoke the
previous day to an informal session of the leading UN body. The
session was organized by the Contact Group. Tudjman repeated his
key positions, stressing that Belgrade must formally renounce any
greater Serbian ambitions toward Croatia by recognizing that
republic in its internationally accepted borders, which Serbian
President Slobodan Milosevic has in effect refused to do. Tudjman
said Zagreb would not be responsible for starting any new trouble
in the region but stressed that the international community must
make sure that some of Croatia's demands for the restoration of
its territorial integrity and the safe return of refugees to their
homes are met within a fixed time frame. At issue is the renewal
of the mandate of UNPROFOR in Croatia, which Zagreb feels has
simply served to lock in Serb gains. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

POLITICAL TRIAL IN KOSOVO. RFE/RL's South Slavic Language
Service's correspondent in Pristina said on 28 September that a
trial began there the previous day of Uksin Hoti. He is a leader
of the Party of National Unity (UNIKOMB), which calls for a
greater Albania and which the Serbs suspect of favoring armed
rebellion, even though its program stresses "democratic methods
and means." Hoti is UNIKOMB's chairman and has been in detention
on charges of "separatism." The court case against him marks the
first time in years that a leader of an ethnic Albanian party in
the Serb-controlled but mainly ethnic Albanian province has gone
on trial. A verdict may be delivered as soon as 28 September. --
Patrick Moore and Nenad Pejic, RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH FOREIGN MINISTER WARNS OF "COLD PEACE." Andrzej Olechowski,
speaking at the UN General Assembly, warned that "cold peace" or,
worse still, "hot chaos" might replace the Cold War as a result of
nations' inability to overcome problems that were only now coming
to the surface. He emphasized Poland's foreign policy aims to join
NATO and the EU were not to perpetuate divisions in the world but
to promote cooperation. In his concluding remarks, Olechowski
asked the assembly to consider striking from the UN Charter
clauses that refer to the former Nazi coalition states as "hostile
states." -- Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

CONFLICT BETWEEN POLISH FINANCE MINISTER AND BANK CHIEF RESOLVED?
The Polish government discussed principles of monetary policy at a
meeting on 27 September attended by President Lech Walesa and
Polish National Bank Deputy Chairman Witold Kozinski. Deputy Prime
Minister and Finance Minister Grzegorz Kolodko told the press that
agreement had been reached on how to ensure that inflation did not
rise above 17% by December 1995. He said that in the future base
interest rates should not exceed the inflation rate by more than
2-3 percentage points. Both Walesa and Kolodko said the recent
conflict between the bank and the Finance Ministry has now been
overcome. Walesa, who has constitutional responsibility for
nominating the bank chairman, claimed credit for the end of the
hostilities, PAP reports. -- Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

NO SOLUTION TO BROADCASTING COUNCIL CONFLICT. Walesa met on 27
September with the Sejm Presidium at the latter's invitation to
discuss Walesa's recent decision to replace two members of the
National Broadcasting Council: Marek Markiewicz and Maciej
Ilowiecki. The two former Walesa associates, who are supported by
most of the Sejm and a large number of Poles, have not accepted
their dismissal and intend to continue performing their duties.
Speaker Jozef Oleksy said the president's decision was predicated
on "a very thin legal basis." Walesa insisted it had been
"imperative" and denied he had been guided by low motives. The
Presidium, enlarged by representatives of interested Sejm
commissions, met later with the NBC, which agreed not to hold
plenary meetings for at least one week pending the outcome of
attempts to obtain legal clarification. Oleksy left open the
question of whether the Sejm would consider bringing the president
up before the State Tribunal should it transpire that the
dismissals had violated the law. -- Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL
Inc.

KLAUS RETURNS FROM FRANCE, HAVEL LEAVES FOR US. Czech Prime
Minister Vaclav Klaus ended a five-day visit to France on 27
September, where he met with French leaders and participated in a
conference of liberal economists in Cannes. Speaking to
journalists after his return to Prague, Klaus said his talks with
French Prime Minister Edouard Balladur on 27 September focused
mainly on the future of the European Union. Also on 27 September,
Czech President Vaclav Havel left for a six-day visit to the
United States, during which he is to meet with American
politicians and cultural figures. He will also receive an honorary
doctorate from Stanford University. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

CZECH DEPUTIES REJECT PLAN TO ELIMINATE SENATE. The lower chamber
of the Czech parliament rejected on 27 September a draft
constitutional amendment providing for the abolition of the
Senate, the parliament's upper house. CTK reports that members of
all four government coalition parties voted to retain the Senate.
The Czech Constitution, adopted at the end of 1992, stipulates
that the parliament consist of two chambers. The former unicameral
parliament of the Czech Lands automatically became the lower
chamber of the new bicameral parliament after the split of
Czechoslovakia on 1 January 1993. However, the lower chamber has
since repeatedly failed to establish the Senate. The draft
amendment rejected on 27 September is the second attempt to
eliminate the upper house. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK PRESIDENT ON UPCOMING ELECTIONS. In an interview with
Reuters on 26 September, Michal Kovac said that based on his
experiences with foreign statesmen and businessmen, Movement for a
Democratic Slovakia Chairman Vladimir Meciar has been "the source
of a certain distrust." He added that the possibility of his
return to power has "renewed doubts among potential foreign
investors." Kovac said he expects the parties that win the
elections to nominate a new cabinet by 6 October. He also noted
that the government will need to have a clear parliamentary
majority. Kovac said if Meciar can build such a coalition, he will
accept Meciar's proposal. But if not, he added, he will pick
another group. -- Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK ELECTION UPDATE. In a statement sent to TASR on 27
September, the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia accused the
Czech News Agency (CTK) of being "anti-Slovak" and criticized its
coverage of the Slovak election campaign. In particular, the
director of the MDS press and information department, Dusan
Kleiman, criticized a CTK report, reprinted in the Slovak daily
Sme on 27 September, that "misrepresented" Meciar. The party
threatened to cancel the CTK correspondent's accreditation.
Meanwhile, the Liberals announced on 27 September that they were
withdrawing the party's list of candidates. They encouraged voters
to support the Christian Democratic Movement and challenged other
groups with less than 5% support in recent opinion polls to do the
same. According to TASR on 26 September, the Slovak political
group that has spent the most on advertising this year is the
coalition of the Movement for a Democratic Slovakia and the
Peasants' Party. From January to 6 September, the coalition spent
3.58 million koruny. In second place was the Democratic Union with
2.07 million koruny, followed by the Democratic
Party-Entrepreneurs' Party (1.75 million koruny), the Slovak
National Party (1.08 million koruny), Common Choice (620,000
koruny) and the Christian Democratic Movement (522,000 koruny). --
Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN PREMIER PAINTS BLEAK ECONOMIC PICTURE. Addressing the
new parliament, Gyula Horn of the Hungarian Socialist Party
sharply criticized the record of the previous, right-of-center
government, MTI reported on 27 September. In the last four years,
3 million people became poor and Hungary lost its comparative
advantage vis-a-vis other Eastern European countries, Horn said.
He also revealed that the heads of the IMF and the World Bank
wrote to him describing Hungary's budget deficit as "critical."
Horn also castigated the previous government's privatization and
agricultural policy. Opposition party members criticized Horn's
speech as meaningless rhetoric and pointed out that he failed to
mention the communist legacy, which the previous government
inherited in 1990. -- Karoly Okolicsanyi, RFE/RL Inc.

GEORGE SOROS RECEIVES HUNGARIAN STATE HONORS. President Arpad
Goncz awarded the Hungarian-born US financier and philanthropist
the medal of the Hungarian Republic, MTI reported on 27 September.
The award was proposed by Prime Minister Gyula Horn, who was also
present at the ceremony. Soros received the award for his efforts
to modernize Hungary in the fields of science, culture, education,
and health care. -- Karoly Okolicsanyi, RFE/RL Inc.

ILIESCU IN WASHINGTON. Romanian President Ion Iliescu is to
conclude a two-day unofficial visit to Washington on 28 September,
Romanian media report. On 27 September he met with US Senate
majority leader George Mitchell and Wilfred Thalwitz, World Bank
Vice President for Europe and Central Asia. On his last day in the
US capital, Iliescu is scheduled to meet with Treasury Secretary
Lloyd Bentsen, Commerce Secretary Ron Brown, and Lee Hamilton,
chairman of the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs
Committee. -- Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIAN GOVERNMENT DISCUSSES CORRUPTION. The Romanian government
on 27 September debated the cases of corruption included in a
special report by a parliamentary commission. The report is to be
submitted to the parliament for discussion on 28 September. Radio
Bucharest said the opposition will present its own report. --
Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

BRITISH FOREIGN OFFICE MINISTER VISITS ROMANIA . . . Douglas Hogg
arrived in Bucharest on 26 September for talks at the Romanian
Foreign Ministry and a meeting with Chairman of the Chamber of
Deputies Adrian Nastase, Romanian media reported. Hogg is to meet
with Prime Minister Nicolae Vacaroiu in Bucharest on 28 September.
-- Michael Shafir, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . AND MOLDOVA. Hogg held talks in Chisinau on 27 September
with Moldovan President Mircea Snegur, Parliament Chairman Petru
Lucinschi, and Foreign Minister Mihai Popov, with whom he signed a
statement on principles of bilateral cooperation, Reuters reports.
He also met with Richard Samuel, the British diplomat who heads
the CSCE's mission in Chisinau and plays a mediating role in the
Chisinau-Tiraspol talks. Stressing "the great importance we attach
to Moldova's sovereignty and independence," Hogg expressed
satisfaction with the agreement initialed in August on the
withdrawal of Russian troops from Moldova. The agreement, which
Russia has so far declined to sign, figured prominently in Hogg's
talks with Moldovan leaders. Hogg also expressed Britain's
willingness to facilitate Moldova's cooperation with the European
Union and within the framework of NATO's Partnership for Peace. --
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

MORE CHOLERA DEATHS IN UKRAINE. UNIAN reported on 27 September
that the number of cholera cases in Ukraine had reached 478.
Eleven people have so far died from the disease. Interfax reported
that Ukraine's chief sanitation doctor, Viktor Maryevsky, has
advised against traveling to Crimea. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

CRIMEAN PRESIDENT WILL NOT RESIGN. Yurii Meshkov has said he will
not resign, Interfax reported on 27 September. As a solution to
the political crisis in Crimea, parliamentary speaker Serhii
Tsekov said he will submit his resignation if Meshkov does the
same. UNIAN quoted Tsekov as saying that one of the biggest
mistakes of the Republican Party of Crimea was supporting Meshkov
in the peninsula's presidential elections. According to Tsekov,
the main threat to Crimea's autonomy is Meshkov's presidency. --
Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

UKRAINIAN-BELARUSIAN RELATIONS. Belarusian Television reported on
23 September that delegations from the Ukrainian and Belarusian
Foreign Ministries have completed a third round of talks in Minsk
on demarcating the border between the two countries. The next
round of talks is to take place in Kiev. UNIAN reported on 26
September that the Belarusian ruble has stabilized on Ukraine's
currency exchange, at approximately 14.3 karbovantsy. -- Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

BELARUSIAN SUPREME SOVIET OPENS NEW SESSION. The Belarusian
Supreme Soviet reconvened session on 27 September, Belarusian
Radio reports. Chairman of the Supreme Soviet Mechyslau Hryb
opened the session saying the top item on the parliament's agenda
would be the country's economic crisis. Prior to the session,
President Alyaksandr Lukashenka sent a letter to deputies in which
he expressed his concern over Belarus's economy. He wrote that the
situation demanded tough economic reforms and asked the deputies
to support him on implementing these measures. Lukashenka also met
with leaders of parliamentary factions, including Syarhei
Navumchyk of the opposition Belarusian Popular Front, Mikalay
Skarynin of the main conservative faction "Belarus," and Aleh
Trusau of the social-democratic Hramada. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL
Inc.

BORDER GUARD COMMANDER APPOINTED IN BELARUS. Col. Vasil Markoukin,
the new commander of the Belarusian border guards, took up his
duties on 26 September, Belarusian Radio reported the next day.
Markoukin served in the Hrodzensk border command and was deputy
head of staff of the main border guard administration. In August
Lukashenka appointed a commission to investigate the activities of
the border guards. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

LATVIAN PRESIDENT ADDRESSES THE UN. Addressing the UN General
Assembly on 27 September, President Guntis Ulmanis emphasized the
importance of the organization, especially in maintaining peace
and security throughout the world. Ulmanis expressed gratitude to
the UN for its role in facilitating the withdrawal of Russian
forces from Estonia and Latvia in August but cautioned that Baltic
security is still a problem because of the continuing Russian
oversight of the Skrunda radar in Latvia, the transit of Russian
military through Lithuania to Kaliningrad, and the nuclear
reactors in the former Russian submarine base in Paldiski,
Estonia. Ulmanis called on "the democratic Russia, which played a
decisive role in the destruction of the 'evil empire' of the USSR,
to assess together with Latvia the Soviet Union's actions against
Latvia in 1940." He also urged both states to sign a document on
the occupation of Latvia and its consequences for the people of
Latvia. Ulmanis said such a document would serve to "harmonize the
relations between the various nationalities residing in Latvia
and, remove a heavy weight from Russia's unenviable burden"
inherited from the USSR. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

CONFERENCE ON MIGRATION AND REPATRIATION IN LATVIA. An
International Conference on Migration and Repatriation took place
in Jurmala, Latvia, on the weekend, LETA reported on 26 September.
Viktors Cernisovs of Latvia's Immigration and Naturalization
Department said that in order to solve migration problems, the
government must draft laws and draw up a migration program. He
noted that while organizing the conference, the department had
established good working relations with organizations such as the
Association of Russia's Latvians and Korni, which supports the
repatriation of Russians to their homeland. Sergei Yagodin of
Russia's Federal Migration Service focused on the difficulties in
Russia stemming from the rapidly increasing numbers of migrants
and refugees, particularly from the Caucasus and Central Asia. He
said that the Russian government was not prepared for this influx
and that migration programs are being financed only sporadically.
He added that one of the main tasks in Russia is to oversee the
orderly flow of people across its borders. Some Russians picketed
the conference and complained that Korni leaders had not provided
them with services they had paid for in order to move to Pskov
Oblast in Russia, Latvian press reported. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL
Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Eileen Downing and Jan Cleave)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
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