Calmness of mind does not mean you should stop your activity. Real calmness should be found in activity itself. - Shunro Suzuki
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 182, 23 September 1994

                              RUSSIA

POWER SHUTOFF GETS EVERYONE'S ATTENTION. Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin railed against the "petty clerks" who shut off power
at the Strategic Rocket Forces central command post on 21
September and promised that they would be punished, according to
ITAR-TASS on 22 September. A power company official tried to play
down the incident, telling Interfax that the company did not know
the identity of the subscriber in arrears when it cut off the
command center's power, and that it was immediately restored after
a phone call from the commander in chief of the rocket forces. The
military denied that the power officials did not realize who they
were dealing with. All involved acknowledged that the Moscow
Military District had not been paying its electric bills. The
command center's debt was variously quoted as 1.5 and 2.5 billion
rubles, while the total unpaid energy bill for the entire district
was said to be either 50 billion or 60 billion rubles. The General
Staff's top financial officer, Colonel General Vasilii Vorobev,
pressed for more money and warned that the military had no means
to pay its power bills, while Krasnaya zvezda, the Defense
Ministry's newspaper, cited other examples of "power blackmail"
and opined that this latest incident "casts doubt on the
effectiveness of the authorities in the country in general."
Finally, Deputy Prime Minister Oleg Soskovets directed the fuel
and energy minister, Yurii Shafranik, to investigate the incident
and give a full report at the next meeting of the government. --
Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA REFUTES PERRY'S NUCLEAR WEAPONS CLAIM. In a 20 September
Washington speech, US Secretary of Defense William Perry warned
that Russia was reducing its arsenal of nuclear weapons more
slowly than the United States. Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman
Grigorii Karasin denied this charge in a 22 September Interfax
statement, claiming that the US had dismantled about 2,000 nuclear
warheads over the last year, while Russia had dismantled "more
than 1,000 nuclear warheads withdrawn from Ukraine and even more
Russian warheads" during the same period. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL
Inc.

FINANCIAL HELP FOR RUSSIAN ARMY ON THE WAY? According to ITAR-TASS
of 22 September, a high-level government commission meeting that
day drafted proposals for improving the funding of the armed
forces both in 1994 and in next year's budget. The article said
that the Interdepartmental Commission on Defense and Security of
the National Security Council had been told that the military had
received less than 40% of the money due it under the present
budget law and that this shortfall was hindering military reform
and had led to a drop in defense production that threatened to
undermine key defense industries vital to the country's security.
-- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN MEETS LEADERS OF PARLIAMENT. On 22 September President
Boris Yeltsin talked with Prime Minister Chernomyrdin and the
speakers of both chambers of the Russian Federal Assembly--Ivan
Rybkin of the State Duma, and Vladimir Shumeiko of the Council of
the Federation. ITAR-TASS said the press was not allowed to attend
the meeting. According to Ostankino TV news, the president noted
that relations between the parliament and himself had stabilized
and asked the two parliamentary leaders to adopt legislation on
land and the civil code and then to produce a clear plan of the
parliament's future work. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

YAVLINSKY'S PRIVATIZATION PROGRAM TRIUMPHS OVER CHUBAIS'S? The
ideas of the liberal economist Grigorii Yavlinsky rather than
those of Anatolii Chubais, the deputy prime minister in charge of
privatization, have been implemented in more than 30 large Russian
cities, most important in Moscow. The 22 September edition of the
Russian TV daily program "Podrobnosti" (Details) gave an account
of Yavlinsky's plans for the Russian capital. The economist
advocates selling off enterprises by auction, while Chubais has
attempted to divide them among Russian citizens on an equal basis.
In an interview with "Podrobnosti," Yavlinsky dismissed Chubais'
program as "fictitious privatization," adding that it did not
create the institution of private property, since state officials
continued to run the privatized enterprises. Moreover, Yavlinsky
went on, it is widely considered to be unjust, because property is
concentrated in the hands of its former managers. Moscow Mayor
Yurii Luzhkov, in turn, said the fact that municipal and state
property was being appropriated freely by such groups meant that
its former owners were left without the means to improve the
living conditions of the population. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL
Inc.

OPPOSITION ACCUSES US OF SUPPORTING "ANTI-DEMOCRATIC FORCES." In a
joint statement cited by Interfax on 22 September, a number of
prominent hard-line politicians accused Washington of having
openly supported anti-democratic tendencies in Russia and thus
fueling "anti-Americanism" in the country. They added that they
did not believe in the sincerity of US leaders who had supported
Yeltsin's anti-constitutional dissolution of the parliament by
decree on 21 September 1993, as well as the president's decision
to send in tanks to fire on the parliamentary building on 4
October of the same year. The statement bears the signatures of
well-known Communists and Russian nationalists, such as former
Vice President Aleksandr Rutskoi, former speaker of the Soviet
parliament Anatolii Lukyanov, and the leader of the Russian
Communist Party Gennadii Zyuganov. It should be borne in mind,
however, that similar views have been voiced by liberal opponents
of the Yeltsin regime in such generally pro-American newspapers as
Izvestiya and Nezavisimaya gazeta. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL
Inc.

YELTSIN INCREASES GORBACHEV'S PENSION. According to Russian TV's
"Vesti" of 22 September, Yeltsin has decreed a sharp increase in
former Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev's monthly pension.
According to the decree, from now on Gorbachev will receive
retirement benefits equal to 40 minimum monthly salaries.
Hitherto, Gorbachev received the sum agreed upon by the leaders of
the new independent states on the eve of his resignation in
November 1991--i.e., 4,000 rubles ($1.63 at today's exchange rate)
a month. Despite Gorbachev's unpopularity in his native country,
such niggardly treatment of the Nobel peace prize winner had been
ridiculed in the media on more than one occasion. The reason for
Yeltsin's change of heart--perhaps Gorbachev's triumph during his
visit to Germany earlier this month or the approach of the Russian
presidential elections and the prospect that Yeltsin himself could
become a "former president" after 12 June 1996--remains a mystery.
-- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

OFFICIALS TO ATTEND COURSES EVERY FIVE YEARS. All Russian
officials will have to attend courses to improve their
professional qualifications every five years, according to a
regulation issued by Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin. The new
rules come into force on the day of their publication in the
official government newspaper Rossiiskaya gazeta--i.e., on 23
September. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

KOZYREV REINFORCES OBJECTIONS TO AZERBAIJAN-WESTERN OIL DEAL.
Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev said on 22 September that
spokesman Grigorii Karasin's legal and ecological objections two
days earlier to the deal between Azerbaijan and a Western
consortium to develop Azerbaijan's offshore oil fields had
"expressed the Foreign Ministry's and Russia's official view,"
Interfax reported. In further remarks to ITAR-TASS on 22
September, Kozyrev insisted that Russia had inherited the USSR's
claim to shared use of Caspian resources, "as Azerbaijan knows
only too well;" that the Western companies must "take into account
all interests including Russia's"; and that all sides "must find a
mutually acceptable solution." He did not spell out Russia's
claims, proposals, or possible recourse. The objections have
surprised Russian oil industry officials, not least the Lukoil
state company which holds 10% of the project's capital; Western
companies account for 70% and Azerbaijan for the remaining 20% of
the planned investment of 7.5 billion dollars. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

REFERENDUM DATE SET IN KYRGYZSTAN. Kyrgyzstan's President Askar
Akaev issued a decree on 22 September setting 22 October as the
date for a referendum on changes to the country's parliament,
Reuters reported from Bishkek. Voters will be asked to approve a
two-chamber parliament; one chamber, of 35 full-time deputies,
would be in session permanently, while the second, consisting of
70 deputies, would meet for brief sessions. The referendum will
also cover Akaev's proposal to allow changes to the constitution
by means of referendums as well as through parliamentary action,
as specified in the constitution. A new parliament is to be
elected on 24 December. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

AZERI MINISTER FIRED AFTER JAILBREAK. Azerbaijani President Geidar
Aliev fired National Security Minister Nariman Imranov on 22
September after former Defense Minister Ragim Gaziev escaped from
prison earlier in the day, Reuters reported. Gaziev and four
military officers on trial with him for defeats in 1993 in the
Karabakh struggle were being held in a prison under the
jurisdiction of the National Security Ministry. Aliev went on
Azerbaijani TV to explain the firing, asserting that Imranov had
helped Gaziev to escape. -- Bess Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

DIFFERENCES DELAY RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN SUMMIT. Russian Foreign
Minister Andrei Kozyrev told Interfax on 22 September that
President Yeltsin's official visit to Ukraine, tentatively planned
at Kiev's request for early October, has been postponed without
another date being set. Briefly in Kiev to "continue the
dialogue," Kozyrev implied that substantial progress must be made
in bridging differences before the visit could be scheduled, but
he was vague about those differences. As a goodwill gesture,
Kozyrev disowned the concept of "elder brother/younger brother" in
Russian-Ukrainian relations, but only to propose "twin brothers."
Russia's Black Sea Fleet commander, Admiral Eduard Baltin,
however, called for an "economic, political, and military drawing
together of the two Slavic states" and urged Ukraine's new
leadership "to subdue the ambitions of the "national-patriots."
Any partition of the fleet or of its shore infrastructure "would
diminish [our] strength in the Mediterranean," he warned. On the
Ukrainian side, parliament chairman Oleksandr Moroz told
ITAR-TASS, also on 22 September, that the Russian-Ukrainian treaty
now under negotiation must reflect the CSCE's principles on the
inviolability of borders. Ukrainian diplomats told Reuters the
same day that Ukraine sought a clear Russian statement on respect
for territorial integrity, objected to Russian proposals on
instituting dual citizenship and "joint" patrols of Ukraine's
border, and had "serious reservations" about Russia's desire to
act as a "peacekeeper" in independent states. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVA WORRIED BY RUSSIAN SIGNALS ON TROOPS. Interviewed in
Nezavisimaya gazeta of 22 September, Dumitru Diacov, chairman of
the Moldovan Parliament's Foreign Affairs Commission, pointed to
"alarming signs" that Moscow might be backtracking from the
agreement initialed on 10 August, but not signed, regarding the
withdrawal of its 14th Army from Moldova. Besides the "categorical
opposition" of that army's commander, Lieutenant General Aleksandr
Lebed, and of Russian nationalist circles, both of which Diacov
found "understandable," Russian government representatives were
now calling for revisions of the agreement (which took two years
to negotiate), Diacov said. Russian officials were also attempting
to "reorient international opinion" by telling Western officials
that Moldova did not insist on the withdrawal and might accept the
troop presence. "Apparently some quarters in Russia badly want to
go back on this agreement," Diacov concluded. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

NATO PLANES BLAST SERBIAN TANK. The BBC reported on 23 September
that British and American aircraft had hit a Serbian tank near
Sarajevo the previous day in response to three Serbian attacks on
UN peacekeepers. The airstrike was requested by the UN deputy
commander, who is French. US Secretary of State Warren Christopher
warned the Serbs that more strikes would follow if they continued
to violate the UN exclusion zone. The Serbs, for their part,
described the raid as "a brutal attack against civilians" and
promised retaliation at a time and place of their choosing. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

BIG STRIKE IN BELGRADE. Borba reported on 23 September on the
general strike of almost 8,000 workers at the IMT motor and
tractor factory. The workers are demanding payment of back wages
and the creation of a loan package for winter needs. Vreme of 12
September had pointed out the complex issues surrounding the
strike and called it a victory for independent trade unionism. AFP
said on 21 September, when the strike began, that it was the
biggest in Serbia since the current economic program had been
launched in January. Borba added that 500 workers at the DMB
enterprise had started a similar strike on 22 September. The
January economic plan created a new and stable currency, ending
hyperinflation and making a folk hero out of the chief banker
behind it. Serbian industry nonetheless remains hard-hit by a
combination of international economic sanctions, the dislocation
of the former Yugoslav market and infrastructure, and years of
communist and neocommunist mismanagement. The Washington Post of
22 September quoted Belgrade experts as saying that it would take
twenty-five years to get industrial production back to its 1989
levels, even with a 5% annual growth rate. Criminal elements, the
rich, and the powerful have fared well under current conditions,
but ordinary Serbs, especially pensioners, have suffered. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH PRESIDENT CONSIDERING VETO ON SECRETS ACT. Prompted by
outraged comments from media representatives in defense of press
freedom, Lech Walesa said on 21 September that he would not sign
the recently passed official secrets act as it now stood. The
Democratic Left Alliance, whose deputies voted to reject a
proposed amendment that would have exempted journalists from legal
liability for revealing confidential information in certain cases,
indicated that it would reconsider its earlier objections. The
publication on the same day of a letter from Henryk Goryszewski,
the head of the National Security Bureau and a close associate of
the president, in which he asked the Sejm commission to reject the
amendment, caused some embarrassment; but Walesa dismissed it as a
"misunderstanding," PAP reports. -- Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL
Inc.

POLISH COURT RULES POLSAT LICENSE IS VALID. The Supreme
Administrative Court ruled on 22 September that the January 1994
decision of the National Broadcasting Council (NBC) to grant the
single national commercial television broadcasting license to
PolSat was valid, PAP reports. Three of PolSat's nine rivals,
including Nicola Grauso's Polonia 1, a network of pirate
television stations, took the NBC to court over the decision. They
claimed that the NBC had not made clear in advance that applicants
with purely Polish capital should have an advantage over those
with foreign capital. The NBC's decision was also criticized by
President Lech Walesa, who dismissed NBC Chairman Marek Markiewicz
shortly afterward. PolSat's standing was undermined by press
allegations questioning PolSat's legal and financial credibility.
The ruling strengthens the position of the NBC and enables PolSat
to begin nationwide broadcasting as planned on 30 September. --
Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

MOVEMENT ON POLISH CONCORDAT? On his return from Rome, Secretary
General of the Polish Episcopate Bishop Tadeusz Pieronek said that
the Holy See was committed to dialogue with the Polish authorities
on the contested issue of ratification of the concordat. According
to an article in Zycie Warszawy of 21 September, Pieronek said the
Holy See would not accept changes in the concordat itself but
would agree to specific language in Polish legislation to overcome
misunderstandings that had arisen since the concordat was signed
in July 1993 with regard to the registration of Church marriages,
burials of nonbelievers on Church grounds, and the teaching of
religion in schools. It would also welcome legislation that would
ensure other religions gain legal status equal to that of the
Catholic Church. Pieronek rejected an earlier proposal by Zbigniew
Siemiatkowski, the head of the Sejm's concordat committee, that
the misunderstandings be solved by an exchange of "letters of
intent." -- Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

MECIAR ON SLOVAKIA, HIS POLITICAL OPPONENTS . . . In an interview
with the Czech daily Rude pravo published on 22 September former
Slovak Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar said that "Slovakia, above
all, needs to confirm and accept its statehood." Other priorities
were "establishing internal political stability" and developing
relations between ethnic minorities and Slovaks. Meciar said that
his Movement for a Democratic Slovakia represented an
"alternative" for Slovakia. He argued that the opponents of his
party were mainly "groups of personally dissatisfied, ambitious
people" who knew which posts they wanted but did "not know what
they [would] do in those posts." According to Meciar, "it would be
optimal for Slovakia" if his party received enough votes to be
able to form a government on its own. The alternative was a
government without and "against" the MDS, "which could mean
instability." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . KOVAC ON MECIAR. In an interview published in Slovensky
vychod on 22 September Slovak President Michal Kovac said that he
realized that former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar wanted to
create the impression that Slovakia was being threatened. The
president argued that there were "no signs that serious problems
could arise between Slovaks and Hungarians living in southern
Slovakia." Kovac said that some people might "play games" or
"stage something," which intelligence services might not always
uncover in advance. Kovac said he had all the information that he,
as president, could have and that he was not aware of any serious
problems. According to Kovac, foreign politicians appreciate the
policies of the current government, which they consider to be
"transparent and understandable." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

CHAIRMAN OF SOCIALIST INTERNATIONAL ON NEXT SLOVAK GOVERNMENT.
Speaking in Bratislava on 22 September, Pierre Mauroy said that
the Socialist International would not be in favor of a
postelection coalition in Slovakia between the Party of the
Democratic Left and Vladimir Meciar's Movement for a Democratic
Slovakia. Mauroy suggested that such a coalition could adversely
influence the SI's decision on accepting the PDL as a member in
1996--a step sought by the PDL as a confirmation of its successful
transformation from a postcommunist into a social-democratic
party. "Social Democracy does not get along with desires for
personal power . . . Social Democracy respects rules and
democratic institutions, including the president," said Mauroy. He
added: "Mr. Meciar does not respect such rules. I prefer parties
that respect [democratic] rules." Mauroy emphasized, however, that
the final decision was with the Slovak electorate and that he was
not visiting Slovakia to "give advice." -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN GOVERNMENT ON WORLD FAIR AND PENSIONS. Gyula Horn's
cabinet, at its 22 September session, decided to submit to
parliament its draft proposal calling for the cancellation of the
1996 World Fair in Budapest, MTI reports. The move, which does not
mean the cancellation of related infrastructural projects, will
result in savings of 45 billion forint ($42 million). The cabinet
also decided to pass in October its proposal to raise pensions by
8%, retroactive to 1 January 1994, so that the first payments can
be made in November. The move will cost 21.2 billion forint and
will increase the country's budget deficit by that amount. --
Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN ARMY HAS MONEY PROBLEMS. Following a closed hearing on
21 September before the parliamentary defense committee, Major
General Nandor Hollosi said that under its current budget the
strength and structure of Hungary's Army could no longer be
financed, MTI reports. The committee asked the Defense Ministry to
prepare an estimate of the cost of Hungary's admission to NATO,
one requirement of which would be to spend at least 3% of the
country's GDP on defense, compared with only 1.78% at present,
when the armed forces should be receiving 2-2.5%. Next year the
government will submit to parliament a comprehensive reform
program for the armed forces to reduce the number of conscripts
and military installations and eliminate obsolete armaments. --
Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

"GIGANTIC" MUSLIM CENTER IN ALBANIA. Gazeta Shqiptare reported on
21 September that a "gigantic" center for Muslim faithful was
currently being built in the northern city of Shkoder. The city is
considered Albania's Catholic stronghold, and in April 1993 the
Pope on his first trip to Albania inaugurated the rebuilding of
the city's cathedral (one of the largest in the Balkans and turned
into a sports arena by the Communists ). To be completed in one
year, the largest Muslim center in Albania will be able to
accommodate 1,500 faithful and will include two mosques and a
large library. The building of the center is being financed by a
Saudi Arabian and is being constructed by a large Turkish company.
-- Louis Zanga, RFE/RL Inc.

FIRST NUCLEAR-ACCIDENT DRILL STAGED IN ROMANIA. Radio Bucharest
reported on 22 September that the country's first nuclear-
accident drill had been staged in the Cernavoda area on the same
day. Some 3,500 people joined in a mock evacuation in trucks,
boats, and trains. The exercise had been intended to test the
authorities' response to a possible disaster at the nuclear power
plant in the town of Cernavoda, which is expected to be
commissioned in May 1995. The drill was attended by Romania's
Defense Minister Gheorghe Tinca, Internal Affairs Minister Doru
Ioan Taracila, and other officials. The Cernavoda plant, Romania's
first nuclear one, uses Canadian "Candu" technology. -- Dan
Ionescu, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIAN LEADERS AND MOLDOVAN OPPOSITIONISTS MEET. The entire
leadership of Moldova's United Democratic Congress, the largest
party of the pro-Romanian opposition, held talks in Bucharest from
20 to 22 September with Romanian President Ion Iliescu, Prime
Minister Nicolae Vacaroiu, government ministers, the leadership of
the ruling Party of Social Democracy (which had invited the
group), the Romanian parliament's leaders, and the leaderships of
several political parties. The talks were highly publicized by
Romania's official media and featured strong attacks on Moldova's
government and parliament. In the sole pledge of material support
to have been given thus far, Corneliu Vadim Tudor, the head of the
ultranationalist and procommunist Great Romania Party--which
supports the government--pledged to set up in Moldova for the
Democratic Congress a radio station and a television studio and to
finance its leaders' travels to the West. -- Vladimir Socor,
RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVA ACKNOWLEDGES ARMS SALE TO SOUTH YEMEN. The chairman of the
Moldovan parliament, Petru Lucinschi, confirmed at a news
conference on 21 September that Moldova had sold four MiG-29
fighters to South Yemen during the recent civil war in Yemen,
Basapress reported that day. In July a Romanian newspaper known
for its sources in Romanian intelligence had revealed the story
about the sale of the jets, which was then picked up by the
Moldovan opposition press. Five Moldovan pilots reportedly
accompanied the aircraft and flew combat missions in Yemen, and a
Moldovan ground team provided maintenance. Moldova inherited
thirty-four MiG-29s from the former USSR in early 1992. One was
transferred to Romania that year. According to the Basapress
report, picked up by Interfax the next day, Lucinschi stressed
that Moldova had violated no international convention or
agreements and announced that Moldova had "absolutely no use for
part of our limited stocks of weapons [and would] be selling
weapons to those who can and may buy them." -- Doug Clarke and
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

LATEST CRIMEAN DEVELOPMENTS. On 22 September various agencies
reported that the Crimean president, Yurii Meshkov, had suspended
his decree dissolving the Crimean parliament. Meshkov said the
move was meant to bring the parliament and government together for
talks to resolve the constitutional crisis. However, the talks
between Meshkov and a parliamentary delegation that followed
failed to resolve their differences. Meshkov insisted that the
deputies repeal their earlier legislation limiting his powers,
while the deputies said that Meshkov's decrees had been
unconstitutional and he should annul, not just suspend, his
decree. The parliamentary speaker, Serhii Tsekov, reiterated his
rejection of Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma's proposed "zero
option" and said that only after Meshkov had cancelled his decree
could parliament decide whether to rescind its resolutions. In
Kiev, the Ukrainian parliament voted to set 1 November as the
deadline for Crimea's parliament to bring the Crimean Constitution
into line with that of Ukraine. -- Ustina Markus, RFE/RL Inc.

ESTONIAN PRIME MINISTER NOT TO RESIGN. Tiit Sinissaar, the
chairman of the Isamaa (Pro Patria) parliamentary faction, told
BNS that at the meeting on 22 September of the ruling
parliamentary faction, now consisting of only Isamaa and Estonian
National Independence Party (ENIP) deputies, there had been no
indication that Prime Minister Mart Laar would step down;
furthermore, Sinissaar denied rumors that Laar himself had said he
wanted to resign. Juri Adams of the ENIP stressed that the present
political situation in Estonia was not a crisis and said that "a
government crisis emerges only when the government resigns or is
forced to resign. What we have at present is either the
opposition's attempts to overthrow the cabinet or disagreements
within the government." -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

FOUR LATVIAN PARLIAMENTARY FACTIONS JOIN FORCES. On 22 September
deputies of the Farmers' Union, Latvia's National Independence
Movement, the Christian Democratic Party, and the For the
Fatherland and Freedom association founded the National Bloc,
which will initially be presided over by the Farmers' Union.
Envisaged as a forum for consultations on problems of vital
importance to the Latvian nation, this bloc differs from the
earlier National Bloc in that it has an executive structure--a
council and a secretariat--that could also develop into a kind of
shadow cabinet in anticipation of the next parliamentary
elections, scheduled for October 1995. The bloc is to be financed
by contributions from the members' factions and supporters'
donations, BNS reported. -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

DISAGREEMENT AMONG LDLP LEADERS ON LITHUANIAN GOVERNMENT.
Gediminas Kirkilas, who was elected chairman of the ruling
Lithuanian Democratic Labor Party's parliamentary faction on 21
September, has recommended the replacement of at least six members
of the present cabinet, BNS reported on 22 September. Earlier,
Kirkilas had circulated a letter to faction members suggesting
that Finance Minister Eduardas Vilkelis, Agriculture Minister
Rimantas Karazija, Industry and Trade Minister Kazimieras
Klimasauskas, Communications and Information Minister Gintautas
Zintelis, Energy Minister Algimantas Stasiukynas, and
Transportation Minister Jonas Birziskis be replaced. Kirkilas
criticized them for their "vague" political position, explaining
that even if 90% of activities in a ministry concerned matters of
a specific branch, the remaining 10% was politics and the
government's political concept had to be realized. Admitting that
his position differed from that of Prime Minister Adolfas
Slezevicius, who is also the LDLP leader, Kirkilas claimed that
there was no conflict between them. In contrast, however,
Slezevicius described Kirkilas's statements as "irresponsible" and
said that his proposals should be regarded as "a form of political
pressure." -- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Penny Morvant and Maggie Evling)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
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Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole