A disagreement may be the shortest cut between two minds. - Kahlil Gibran
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 179, 20 September 1994

                              RUSSIA

RUSSIAN AND GERMAN SECURITY SERVICES DISCUSS NUCLEAR SMUGGLING.
ITAR-TASS reported on 19 September that the director of the
Federal Counterintelligence Service (FSK), Sergei Stepashin, had
begun talks in Bonn with the German security services coordinator,
Bernd Schmidbauer, and the chiefs of the German secret services.
The main topic of discussion was the prevention of the smuggling
of nuclear materials from CIS states. Stepashin and other Russian
officials have repeatedly denied that the plutonium confiscated in
Germany in recent months originated in Russia, but Stepashin
agreed to cooperate with the Germans in investigating these cases.
Joint measures against international criminal networks involved in
drug trafficking, smuggling, and illegal immigration were
discussed. According to Aleksandr Lopushinsky, an official at the
German Department of the Russian Foreign Ministry, the two
countries will soon sign a document on cooperation on various
aspects of national security. The Russian side also expressed a
desire to cooperate with the newly formed European Police Agency,
Europol.   Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

NEW COMPOSITION OF PRESIDENTIAL COUNCIL. President Boris Yeltsin
has approved the new membership of the Presidential Council, a
major consultative body attached to the Office of the President,
according to an ITAR-TASS report of 17 September. There are almost
no changes in the 28-member council, which includes former Prime
Minister Egor Gaidar; Yeltsin's military adviser General Dmitrii
Volkogonov; acting Moscow Major Yurii Luzhkov; St. Petersburg
Mayor Anatolii Sobchak; the scientists Sergei Karaganov, Andrannik
Migranyan, and Emil Pain; and the intellectuals Daniil Granin,
Yurii Karyakin, and Mikhail Zakharov. The role of the Presidential
Council, which has no clearly defined functions, has diminished
recently, following Yeltsin's establishment of several parallel
bodies, including the Expert Council and the Public Chamber. The
body that exerts the greatest influence over the president's
policies is the Coordinating Analytical Council, which is headed
by the chief of the Presidential Administration, Sergei Filatov,
and includes Yeltsin's inner circle of administrators.   Victor
Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

STARS OF GORBACHEV ERA FORM NEW SOCIAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY. On 15
September a group of prominent Russian politicians announced at
the Ostankino TV center their decision to set up a new Social
Democratic Party. The list of members of the new party's
organizing committee, topped by its chairman, Aleksandr
Yakovlev--the father of the glasnost policy of the late 1980s and
now chairman of the Ostankino Radio and Television Company--reads
like a "Who's Who" of the Gorbachev era, including the last Soviet
defense minister, Evgenii Shaposhnikov; former Moscow Mayor
Gavriil Popov; the economists Stanislav Shatalin and Nikolai
Shmelev; and other celebrities of the perestroika period. The
first Social Democratic Party to emerge in postcommunist Russia
was set up in 1990, soon after Article 6 of the USSR Constitution,
the mainstay of the communist dictatorship, was removed, but it
later split because of disagreements over Yeltsin's reforms. The
new party will embrace at least one of the Social Democratic
groupings that remained after the rupture--that headed by
Aleksandr Golov. Whether it will be able to attract other
prominent politicians who have announced plans to form Social
Democratic parties--namely, Mikhail Gorbachev, Grigorii Yavlinsky,
and Vasilii Lipitsky--remains to be seen.   Julia Wishnevsky,
RFE/RL Inc.

OFFICERS' UNION PICKETS PROSECUTOR. Interfax reported on 19
September that supporters of the Officers' Union had picketed the
Russian Military Prosecutor's Offices that day. They were
demanding that criminal proceedings against the leader of the
radical nationalist Union, Lt. Col. Stanislav Terekhov, be
stopped. Terekhov was dismissed from the armed forces in 1993
because of his political activities and arrested for his role in
the attack on the headquarters of the CIS Joint Armed Forces in
September 1993, in which a policeman and an elderly woman were
killed. The protesters maintained that Terekhov should not be
tried, because of the amnesty for those who took part in the 1993
Moscow events approved by the State Duma on 23 February 1994.
Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA TO SEND OBSERVERS TO HAITI. A political adviser to the
Russian foreign minister told ITAR-TASS on 19 September that
Russia would send several observers to Haiti as part of a UN
force. She stressed that Russia would only participate in what she
called the second stage of Haitian operations: the deployment of
an international police contingent to help restore public order;
the first stage was the military operations undertaken by the
United States. Vladimir Lukin, chairman of the State Duma's
international affairs committee, charged that the government's
"exotic" idea of sending Russian troops to participate in an
international police force in Haiti was unconstitutional. Only the
Federation Council, he said, could make such a decision.   Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSO-FINNISH MILITARY AGREEMENT. Col. Gen. Mikhail Kolesnikov,
chief of the Russian General Staff, and Admiral Jan Klenberg,
commander in chief of Finland's armed forces, signed an agreement
on cooperation between their two defense ministries in Moscow on
19 September. According to ITAR-TASS, the agreement calls for
joint activities to develop contacts between the Russian and
Finnish armed forces over the next two years. When asked whether
Finland was concerned about the growing number of Russian troops
in the Leningrad military district as a result of the withdrawals
from Eastern Europe and the Baltic States, Admiral Klenberg said:
"We do not feel any threat in this respect."   Doug Clarke, RFE/RL
Inc.

YELTSIN DECLARES 12 DECEMBER "CONSTITUTION DAY." On 19 September,
according to Russian TV newscasts, President Yeltsin decreed a new
state holiday--12 December--to be celebrated as Constitution Day
to mark the new constitution approved by a referendum on 12
December 1993. Three constitutions were adopted in Russia during
the Soviet era, and the present (fourth) one is widely regarded as
a transitory document from the communist regime to a true
democracy. Both hard-core and liberal critics claim that Yeltsin
has already violated some provisions of the new constitution, most
important those on human-rights guarantees (in his decree on
combating organized crime).   Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIKISTAN UPDATE. Iran's President Hashemi Rafsanjani has called
on both Tajikistan's government and the Tajik opposition to
observe the cease-fire that was agreed between the two sides, with
Iranian, Russian and UN mediation, on 17 September, Reuters,
quoting the official Iranian news agency IRNA, reported on 19
September. Russian Foreign Ministry officials have made the same
plea, Interfax reported the same day, and added an appeal for the
cease-fire to go into effect immediately rather than waiting for
UN observers to be deployed. Also on 19 September Radio Dushanbe
reported that fighting had ended in the strategically important
Tavildara region east of Dushanbe, with opposition units
retreating toward Gorno-Badakhshan. Tajik government troops have
been fighting sporadically in the region for more than a year to
gain and keep control of a major highway to Badakhshan.   Bess
Brown, RFE/RL Inc.

COMPROMISE OVER RETURN OF GEORGIAN REFUGEES TO ABKHAZIA. On 16
September Russian Defense Minister Pavel Grachev flew to Abkhazia
for talks in Novyi Afon with Abkhaz parliament chairman Vladislav
Ardzinba and Georgian parliament chairman Eduard Shevardnadze
aimed at defusing tension over the planned return to Gali Raion of
thousands of Georgian refugees. A second round of talks on 17
September, at which Georgia was represented by Defense Minister
Varden Nadibaidze, culminated in an agreement whereby Abkhazia
would not hinder the return of Georgian refugees provided Georgia
withdrew all remaining military equipment from the Kodori gorge,
according to Interfax, which also quoted Shevardnadze as
affirming, without any clarification, that the repatriation
agreement was also linked to Abkhazia's future political status.
(On 9 September, the commander of the Russian peacekeeping forces
in Abkhazia told Interfax that local Svans were opposing the
removal of military equipment from the Kodori gorge on the grounds
that this would leave them vulnerable to an Abkhaz attack.) On 19
September Shevardnadze and Ardzinba met separately in Sochi with
Russian President Yeltsin to discuss the Abkhaz situation,
ITAR-TASS reported.   Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

CSCE REACTS TO RUSSIAN STANCE ON KARABAKH . . . According to an
RFE/RL correspondent's report of 17 September, at a meeting in
Prague the CSCE's Committee of Senior Officials objected to
unilateral Russian actions vis-a-vis Karabakh. Committee members
from NATO and neutral countries complained that Russia had
recently initiated an Armenian-Azerbaijani summit in Moscow
without informing the CSCE, that it had snubbed a meeting
organized by the CSCE's Minsk group (to which Russia itself
belongs), and had pressed for a Russian/CIS peacekeeping force to
be deployed in Karabakh rather than a CSCE-sponsored multinational
force, including Russia, as the Minsk group seeks. Delegates
pointed to the apparent contradiction in Russia's policy of
seeking to make the CSCE superior in status to regional security
organizations while simultaneously undercutting it by unilateral
action in the East. The committee issued a statement calling for
"direct contacts" among the parties to the conflict, the
"harmonization" and "coordination" of mediation activities, the
deployment of 600 unarmed CSCE monitors in Karabakh, and "active
exploration" of the idea of sending a multinational CSCE
peacekeeping force to the area.   Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . AND MOLDOVA. Also at the Prague meeting, the Committee of
Senior Officials issued a statement on the agreement between
Russia and Moldova, initialed but not signed on 10 August, on the
withdrawal of Russian troops from Moldova within three years. The
committee called for the agreement to be brought into effect "as
early as possible" and for the withdrawal of the 14th Army and the
search for a political settlement of the Transdniester issue to be
conducted as "parallel processes that will not hamper each other."
It urged greater efforts, "with the continued assistance of the
CSCE Mission and the representative of the Russian Federation," to
define Transdniester's status on the basis of CSCE principles,
"particularly the independence, sovereignty, and territorial
integrity of Moldova." The statement follows indications that
Russia may be backtracking on the agreement and attempting to make
its implementation conditional upon a Transdniester settlement
that would tacitly condone the area's secession from Moldova. The
committee also called for the implementation of the December 1993
and July 1994 agreements on giving the CSCE Mission in Moldova
unrestricted access to the cease-fire control commission's
meetings and the security zone; Russia has been hindering the
implementation of these accords.   Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

NAZARBAEV ELABORATES ON EURASIAN UNION PLAN. Interviewed on
Ostankino TV on 17 September, Kazakhstan President Nursultan
Nazarbaev linked his Eurasian Union plan to the Russian ideology
of Eurasianism (which advocates that Russia develop separately
from the West). Denying any attempt to restore the Soviet Union
and referring to the "independence and sovereignty" of CIS states,
Nazarbaev called for an integrated "cultural and spiritual space,"
a common market, "common borders," a coordinated foreign policy,
and a common parliament to rectify a situation in which "each
state is going its own legislative way." The Eurasian Union "would
benefit the multinational people of the area [formerly] known as
the Soviet Union," he argued.   Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

BOSNIAN GOVERNMENT WANTS GENERAL ROSE TO GO. The BBC reported on
20 September that the mainly Muslim and Croat government of Bosnia
wants the UN forces commander there, General Sir Michael Rose, to
be replaced. Bosnia-Herzegovina's ambassador to the UN, Muhamed
Sacirbey, said that Rose had proved incapable of carrying out the
basic provisions of his mandate to ensure the safety and security
of Sarajevo. Reuters noted on 19 September that Rose had accused
the Muslims of starting the latest round of fighting the previous
day in order to provoke the Serbs and thereby provide grounds for
calling in NATO air strikes against Serbian positions. Other UN
sources, however, said that the Muslims' "attack had a genuine
military objective" in trying to cut a Serbian supply route in
response to the Serbs' shutting off the city's water, gas, and
power supplies, a move now in its sixth day. UN personnel have
previously charged Rose with having a pro-Serbian bias, most
notably in his assessment of the situation in Gorazde last spring.
  Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

"THE LARGEST INCIDENT OF ETHNIC CLEANSING IN BOSNIA IN ALMOST TWO
YEARS." This is how The New York Times of 20 September described
the latest Serb expulsions of Muslims from the Bijeljina area that
began on 18 September. The paper said that the total of people
driven from Serbian-held territory in Bosnia since mid-July had
reached 10,000, and news agencies quoted UN spokesman Ron Redmond
on 19 September as saying that the Serbs had expelled more than
100,000 non-Serbs from their homes over the past two years. It has
been just over a week since Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic
promised to halt "ethnic cleansing."   Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

BOSNIAN SERB LEADER WARNS RUSSIA THAT IT MUST HELP SERBS.
ITAR-TASS reported from Bosnian Serb headquarters in Pale on 19
September that Radovan Karadzic had told its correspondent that
Russia must openly help the Serbs to oppose "Western strategic
interests." He added that Russia stood to lose influence in the
Balkans "forever" if it failed to use the Serbs in support of its
own "strategic interests."   Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

MEETING BETWEEN POLISH PRESIDENT AND PRIME MINISTER CALLED OFF. A
planned meeting between Lech Walesa and Waldemar Pawlak, which was
to have been the first of regular Monday morning consultations,
came to naught on 19 September, Polish Television reported. They
were to have sought a way out of the impasse over the appointment
of a new police chief. Instead, the two leaders exchanged remarks
over the telephone, each reasserting his preference for his own
candidate. Pawlak insisted that any decision be suspended pending
the outcome of a new health examination for his candidate, Leszek
Lamparski, who retired from the force in 1991 after being
certified unfit for duty.   Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH PRESIDENT AT CONCLUSION OF PARTNERSHIP MANEUVERS. Lech
Walesa took part in the closing ceremony of Cooperative Bridge
'94, the first multinational maneuvers to be held within the
framework of NATO's Partnership for Peace program, in Biedrusko
near Poznan from 12 to 16 September. According to PAP, he said
that Poland regarded NATO as the principal guarantor of security
on the European continent and appreciated the need for a US
military presence in Europe. He added that Poland expected from
NATO an understanding of and support for its security aspirations
and deplored the fact that it still had no clear prospects of when
it might hope to attain full NATO membership.   Anna
Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

THE POLISH ECONOMY IN AUGUST. Poland's Main Statistical Office
announced on 15 September that domestic prices had risen by an
average of 1.7% in August, in comparison with July, and by 32.2%
in comparison with August 1993. There was a slight drop in the
number of unemployed: 0.6% over the previous month. Unemployment
also fell by 0.6% over July; but the overall unemployment total of
2,965,400 still is a 9.1% increase over August 1993.   Anna
Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

CZECH DEFENSE MINISTER TO BE RECALLED. On 19 September the
leadership of the Christian and Democratic Union/People's Party
asked Prime Minister Vaclav Klaus to recall Defense Minister
Antonin Baudys from his post. Baudys is a member of that party.
CTK reported that President Vaclav Havel had accepted the news of
the CDU/PP's proposal "with full understanding, because for some
time he has been alarmed by the public's diminishing trust in the
army." In recent months the minister has been criticized for
political mistakes. Baudys told CTK on 19 September that he
disagreed with his removal, arguing that such a step could
"adversely influence the transformation of the Czech Army." CDU/PP
Chairman Josef Lux told CTK that Vilem Holan, the director of a
foreign ministry department, was the party's new candidate for the
post.   Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATS AT ODDS WITH GOVERNMENT. Speaking at a
press conference in Bratislava on 19 September, Jan Carnogursky,
the chairman of the Christian Democratic Movement (CDM), said that
his party disagreed with the government's plan to privatize five
major Slovak companies before the forthcoming elections by means
of direct sales to specific owners because they resemble the
practice of Vladimir Meciar's government, which was ousted in
March. In anticipation of its ouster, the Meciar government
approved a number of questionable privatization projects in its
final days. Carnogursky stressed that the CDM agreed with speeding
up privatization but that the process should be limited to voucher
privatization and direct sales should be avoided from ten days
before the elections.   Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

MECIAR AT THE CENTER OF ASSASSINATION SPECULATION. On 19 September
Narodna obroda and other Slovak media discussed speculation that
former Prime Minister Vladimir Meciar had been preparing to feign
an assassination attempt on himself, to boost his election
chances. The speculation was apparently partly triggered by
Meciar's recent mention of a "coming decisive break in the
election campaign." The latest opinion polls suggest that Meciar
will win the elections but will not be able to form a government
on his own. Dusan Kleiman, a press spokesman for Meciar's Movement
for a Democratic Slovakia (MDS), told journalists on 19 September
that the speculation was "a provocation of the highest caliber"
and that such a move on Meciar's part would be unnecessary,
because 94% of his supporters were convinced that he would win the
election   Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN OPPOSITION PARTY REJECTS DRAFT SUPPLEMENTARY BUDGET.
Zoltan Pokorni, deputy head of the parliamentary faction of the
Alliance of Young Democrats (AYD), told MTI on 19 September that
his party was rejecting the government's draft supplementary
budget. According to the AYD, the draft in its present form was
not even suitable for parliamentary debate as it lacked the
measures needed to improve Hungary's economy and contradicted in
some areas the government's own policy.   Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL
Inc.

SWISS AND SPANISH MILITARY OFFICIALS VISIT HUNGARY. Army Corps
General Arthur Liener, the Swiss Army's chief of staff, arrived in
Hungary at the invitation of Hungarian Army Commander and Chief of
Staff Colonel General Janos Deak, MTI reported. Liener will visit
the Miklos Zrinyi Military Academy and an artillery unit and view
the joint Hungarian-British peace-keeping training exercise in
eastern Hungary. Lieutenant General Jose Maura Martin, chief of
staff of the Spanish Army's Ground Forces, arrived in Hungary on
18 September for a five-day visit during which he will view
several Hungarian Army units.   Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

AIRPORT STRIKE LAUNCHED IN ROMANIA. Romanian airport workers
launched an indefinite strike on 19 September to back demands for
higher pay and a reorganization of the sector, Radio Bucharest has
reported. According to the leader of the Federation of Airport
Trade Unions, nine of the sixteen airports affiliated to his
organization were participating in the work stoppage. The strike
did not affect Bucharest's international Otopeni Airport but
disrupted flights to and from the airports in Timisoara and
Constanta, used by both domestic and international airlines. It
also affects the airports in Oradea, Satu Mare, Baia Mare,
Suceava, Cluj, Targu Mures and Bucharest-Baneasa.   Dan Ionescu,
RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIA'S HUNGARIANS WANT FULL TUITION IN MOTHER TONGUE. Radio
Bucharest reported that on 19 September the country's ethnic
Hungarians reiterated their demand for education at all levels in
their mother tongue. Leaders of the Hungarian Democratic
Federation of Romania, the minority's main political party,
presented an eight-page document to the Senate asking for full
tuition in Hungarian and the return of Church properties seized by
the Communists. The petition had been signed by 492,000 people
over the past three weeks. The signatures were collected in
reaction to a new education bill limiting ethnic education rights,
which already passed the Chamber of Deputies and will soon be
voted on in the Senate.   Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL Inc.

BULGARIAN PRESIDENT ASKS UDF TO FORM GOVERNMENT. Radio Sofia
reported on 19 September that Bulgarian President Zhelyu Zhelev
had asked the Union of Democratic Forces (UDF), the second largest
parliamentary group, to form a government. The nonparty government
of Lyuben Berov resigned in the middle of September. The Socialist
Party, the strongest political group in the country, has refused
to form a new government, calling instead for early elections. The
UDF is divided on the issue of new elections; its deputies will
decide on 20 September whether to accept Zhelev's offer.   Jiri
Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

TENSION BETWEEN TIRANA AND ATHENS CONTINUES. International media
reported on 17 September that President Sali Berisha had visited
Albania's southern region, where most of the Greek minority live.
He wanted to express "respect and appreciation" for those Greeks
and urged Athens to overcome the differences between the two
Balkan neighbors through dialogue. Tension nonetheless mounted as
the two countries exchanged mutual accusations at the CSCE meeting
in Prague on 16 September, an RFE/RL correspondent reported. On 17
September, moreover, Berisha imposed a visa requirement for Greek
visitors following Greece's decision to cancel some visas it had
already issued to Albanians. Greeks have been able to travel
visa-free to Albania for over four years.   Patrick Moore, RFE/RL
Inc.

CRIMEAN PRESIDENT REJECTS GOVERNMENT'S RESIGNATION. Interfax
reported on 19 September that Crimean President Yuri Meshkov had
refused to accept the resignation of the government headed by
Deputy Prime Minister Yevgeny Saburov. Meshkov also denied reports
that he had instructed his deputy, Volodymyr Korpov, to form a new
government. The Crimean parliament, which is locked in a power
struggle with Meshkov, passed a vote of no-confidence in the
government on 15 September. Crimean Justice Minister Lyubov
Yeliseyeva-Bora told Interfax that the constitution allowed
parliament to hold votes of no-confidence in the government but
that it did not say when the president had to propose a new
candidate for head of government.   Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVAN PLEAS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. In an appeal to
international governmental and human rights organizations,
reported by Basapress on 17 September, Moldova's Helsinki
Committee called attention to the "Dniester" Russian authorities'
"forced denationalization" of Moldovans and Ukrainians. Although
Transdniester's population is 40% Moldovan, 28% Ukrainian, and
25.5% Russian, only 20% of schools teach in "Moldovan" and 0.5% in
Ukrainian, while 77% teach in Russian, according to the committee.
Meanwhile, parents and teachers at the three Moldovan schools that
still use the Latin alphabet--in Tiraspol, Bendery, and
Rabnita--continue picketing and other forms of protest against the
"Dniester" authorities' orders to switch to the Russian alphabet;
they have also appealed in recent days to the CSCE, the UN, and
the USA for support. A delegation of the protesters was received
by the US Ambassador to Chisinau, Mary Pendleton.   Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVA CLOSER TO ADMISSION TO COUNCIL OF EUROPE. A delegation of
the Council of Europe, headed by its new secretary-general, Daniel
Tarschys (Sweden), and the chairman of its Committee of Ministers,
Stanislav Daskalov (Bulgaria), conferred in Chisinau on 19
September with Moldovan President Mircea Snegur, Parliament
Chairman Petru Lucinschi, and the leaders of parliamentary
parties, Moldpres, Basapress, and RFE's correspondent reported the
same day. The delegates reiterated the Council of Europe's
satisfaction with Moldova's parliamentary elections and new
constitution and predicting that their own findings would speed up
Moldova's admission to the organization as a full member. They
also said the "Dniester Republic" was "absolutely illegitimate."
The Moldovan officials asked that Russia's admission to the
council be linked to the withdrawal of its troops from Moldova.
They insisted that the massive Russian arsenal and ammunition
stores be removed lest they fall into the hands of "Dniester"
leaders. Snegur and Lucinschi refuted Romania's recent attacks on
Moldova's constitution and deplored Romania's open support for the
minority in Chisinau, which calls for Moldova's merger with
Romania. Unlike the opposition "in any other country," the
opposition in Chisinau resists the notion of Moldovan statehood,
they said. Moldova had earlier lodged similar complaints at the
Council of Europe.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

SPLIT IN ESTONIA'S RULING COALITION. Baltic media reported on 19
September that at their meeting on 18 September the Social
Democratic Party of Estonia (SDPE) had decided to leave the
coalition and withdraw from the cabinet its minister for social
affairs, Marju Lauristin, if the parliament did not dismiss the
cabinet of ministers by the end of September. The reasons given
for the decision were insufficient support from the coalition for
the social reform proposed by the SDPE, the refusal of the cabinet
to approve an increase in unemployment benefits, the intention of
the Isamaa (Pro Patria) political party to create a right-wing
bloc with the Union of Tax-Payers, and the position of the
government and Prime Minister Mart Laar on the so-called "ruble
scandal," dating from the monetary reform in Estonia in 1992 when
some two billion rubles were not transferred to Russia but were
supposedly sold to Chechnya. While it does not appear that the
SDPE will join the parliamentary opposition, the SDPE decision
clearly weakens the position of Laar's government as well as the
that of the ruling parliamentary coalition.   Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL Inc.

DISPUTE OVER RUSSIA'S MARKING OF BORDER WITH ESTONIA. At the
meeting of CSCE officials in Prague, Russia's decision to mark
unilaterally what it considers its border with Estonia was
discussed on September 16, according to RFE/RL's correspondent in
Prague. Tallinn has asked for the CSCE's help in settling the
dispute, which stems from Moscow's view that the Estonian
territory annexed by the RSFSR after World War II belongs to
Russia. The Russian delegation rejected the need for outside
mediation and insisted that Estonia, when it declared its
independence in 1991, had inherited its former Soviet borders.
Swedish representatives, however, stressed that there was a "clear
and urgent need to decide this issue at the negotiating table" and
suggested that if Russia and Estonia could not resolve the matter
bilaterally, the CSCE could act as a mediator. BNS reported on 16
September that Russia had installed a total of 139 border posts in
the period from 11 August to 15 September on the temporary
borderline with Estonia and that workers had also dug 227 holes
for other border posts and cleared a 26.5-kilometer strip of land
of trees.   Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIA PROTESTS AIR SPACE VIOLATIONS BY BELARUS. On 19
September Lithuanian Deputy Foreign Minister Rimantas Sidlauskas
presented a formal protest note to Belarusian Ambassador to
Lithuania Yevgeni Voitovich over violations of Lithuanian airspace
by Belarusian aircraft, BNS reported. According to the note,
Belarusian military planes violated Lithuania's air space
thirty-one times on 16 September. Unsanctioned flights were
conducted over Adutiskis, which is a Lithuanian town, while a
nearby railroad station is claimed by both Lithuania and Belarus.
Lithuania has already protested violations of its air space by
Belarus four times this year. In a related development, Lithuanian
and Belarusian representatives continued consultations on 16
September on ways to resolve the Adutiskis railroad station
dispute and reported that they were "approaching a mutually
beneficial agreement." Dzintra Bungs
[As of 1200 CET]
Compiled by Penny Morvant and Maggie Evling

by Penny Morvant and Maggie Evling)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU.  This report is also
available by postal mail, as are the other publications of the
Institute, and by fax.  RFE/RL NEWS BRIEFS, an edited compendium
of items first published in the Daily Report, is distributed
along with the RFE/RL RESEARCH REPORT, a weekly journal
providing topical analyses of political, economic and security
developments throughout the Institute's area of interest.
Longer analyses are available in a monograph series, RFE/RL
STUDIES, and brief analytic summaries appear monthly in the
RESEARCH BULLETIN.

Requests for permission to reprint or retransmit this material
should be addressed to PD@RFERL.ORG and will generally be
granted on the condition that the material is clearly attributed
to the RFE/RL DAILY REPORT. Inquiries about specific news items
or subscriptions to RFE/RL publications should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

In North America:

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907
Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783
Internet: RI-DC@RFERL.ORG

Elsewhere:

Ms. Helga Hofer
Publications Department
RFE/RL Research Institute
Oettingenstrasse 67
80538 Munich
Germany
Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2632
Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648
Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole