To live is so startling, it leaves little time for anything else. - Emily Dickinson
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 178, 19 September 1994

                              RUSSIA

YELTSIN DECREE ON NUCLEAR MATERIAL SAFEGUARDS. President Boris
Yeltsin has signed a decree on improving the way Russia keeps
track of and safeguards its nuclear materials. The text of the new
edict was broadcast by RIA on 16 September. It calls for an
interdepartmental commission to examine the present state of
affairs in this area and to report back to Yeltsin by 15 October.
The Russian government is tasked with quickly developing a state
information system to account for nuclear materials, strengthening
the inspection bodies, and developing "more modern technical
means" of monitoring nuclear materials. Responsibility for the
accounting and monitoring is to be vested in the Federal
Supervisory Agency for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, which is to
report directly to the president. This would seem to imply that
this agency will get better cooperation from the military than it
has in the past. Meanwhile, Sergei Stepashin, head of the Federal
Counterintelligence Service, again denied that the smuggled
plutonium recently uncovered in Germany originated in Russia. In
remarks published by Interfax on 18 September, he also claimed
that the security of nuclear materials in Russia was adequate--a
position belied by Yeltsin's decree. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

DUDAEV'S TROOPS ATTACK OPPOSITION. On 16 September an adviser to
Chechen President Dzhokhar Dudaev arrived in Moscow for talks with
Russian officials on the possibility of signing a new bilateral
confederation treaty between Russia and Chechnya, Interfax
reported, but ITAR-TASS on the same day quoted a spokesman for the
Russian Ministry for Nationality Affairs as affirming that Russia
had no intention of conducting talks with the Dudaev regime. On 17
September, Dudaev's forces launched an artillery attack on
Tolstoi-Yurt, the headquarters of former Russian parliament
speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov, but failed to take the village,
according to a spokesman for the opposition Provisional Council.
Four opposition troops, including a cousin of Khasbulatov, were
killed in the fighting. Chechen government forces did succeed in
taking control of the main road north from Grozny to the Russian
Federation. Also on 17 September, a Chechen government spokesman
denied earlier reports that Dudaev had already signed a decree
introducing martial law throughout the region, ITAR-TASS reported.
-- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

LAW AGAINST DIRTY MONEY. A new law aimed at combating money
laundering will authorize law-enforcement agencies to check the
source of citizens' income through the national bank and other
financial institutions, the deputy chief of the MVD Administration
for Economic Crime, Evgenii Novikov, told Rossiiskaya gazeta on 16
September. The Russian government has already introduced
regulations allowing the law-enforcement agencies to obtain
information about all transactions involving more than $10,000
from both private and business accounts at the Central Bank and
commercial banks; these will remain in effect until the new law is
adopted next month. The new controls were sharply criticized in
Izvestiya of 16 September as violating not only legislation on
banking but also the basic rights of Russian citizens. One of the
authors of the new law, senior MVD official Viktor Ageev, said,
however, that some journalists and economists "were so opposed to
state control over citizens' economic activity that they had
failed to notice when their incomes had come under the control of
organized criminal groups," Nezavisimaya gazeta reported on 10
September -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

KOSTIKOV SIGNALS YELTSIN WILL STAND IN NEXT PRESIDENTIAL
ELECTIONS. In an interview with Interfax on 16 September
presidential spokesman Vyacheslav Kostikov hinted strongly that
Yeltsin would run in the presidential elections scheduled for June
1996. Interfax quoted Kostikov as saying that "democrats are
betting on B. Yeltsin in 1996," adding that the time was
approaching when Yeltsin would make a final decision. Some leading
Russian politicians, such as the father of the market-oriented
reform program Egor Gaidar and St. Petersburg Mayor Anatolii
Sobchak, have said that Yeltsin is the only figure capable of
uniting the various feuding democratic factions, while others,
including former Finance Minister Boris Fedorov, have voiced a
preference for another candidate, the economist Grigorii
Yavlinsky. -- Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

YELTSIN DENIES REORGANIZATION OF FSK. Presidential spokesman
Kostikov has denied that the Federal Counterintelligence Service
may be disbanded, ITAR-TASS reported on 16 September. Kostikov
said Yeltsin had no plans to reorganize the FSK and that he
considered it an important state institution. Kostikov's statement
comes after the publication in Trud of 16 September of a report
that Yeltsin's National Security Aide, Yurii Baturin, had drafted
a decree dissolving the FSK. According to the report, the FSK's
duties would be shared among the Presidential Office, the Prime
Minister Office, the Ministry of Justice, the MVD, and the
Ministry of Defense. -- Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

RUSSIA TO GIVE 45 ARMORED VEHICLES TO PALESTINIANS. Russia is to
give 45 BRDM-2 armored personnel carriers to the Palestine
Liberation Organization (PLO) to be used by Palestinian police in
the Gaza Strip and the West Bank according to a report published
by Interfax on 18 September. The vehicles will be delivered in
early 1995. Igor Ivanov, first deputy foreign minister, also
revealed that Russia would train a small group of Palestinian
policemen free of charge. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

MOSCOW RETURNS BODY OF COLD WAR CASUALTY. The body of an American
Air Force captain killed when his spy plane was shot down by the
Soviets in 1952 was returned to US authorities in Moscow on 15
September. Reuters said that the flyer's remains were exhumed
several weeks ago on Yurii Island in the Pacific Kuril Island
chain by a joint team of Russian and US investigators. The captain
had been the navigator aboard an RB-29 reconnaissance aircraft
shot down by Soviet fighters on 7 October 1952. -- Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL Inc.

BOEING TO USE "CONCORDSKY." The American aircraft company Boeing
signed an agreement in Moscow on 15 September to use up to three
Tupolev Tu-144 supersonic airliners in a research program. The
Tu-144 was dubbed "Concordsky" in the West owing to its similarity
to the Anglo-French Concorde. It was in limited service during the
1970s and early 1980s. A prototype crashed at the 1973 Paris air
show, killing a number of people. According to Reuters, Boeing
intends to use the aircraft as a technology testing platform in
research for the High Speed Civil Transport program. -- Doug
Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

GROUND FORCES COMMANDER ON HIS TROOPS. Colonel General Vladimir
Semenov, the commander in chief of Russia's Ground Forces, told
ITAR-TASS on 15 September that the Moscow, Leningrad, North
Caucasus, Transbaikal, and Far Eastern Military Districts could be
transformed into operational fronts in time of war. The role of
the Volga, Urals, and Siberian Military Districts would be to
prepare reserves and mobilize units for the five first-echelon
districts. Semenov said that the Moscow MD would have to accept
the largest number of units returning from Germany and the Baltic
States, and that it would take two years to accommodate all of
them fully. He regretted that some of the celebrated combat units
from World War II could not be kept intact, but said that his
Ground Forces had to accept cuts like all the rest of the armed
services. -- Doug Clarke, RFE/RL Inc.

JOINT EXERCISE IN NORTH CAUCASUS MD. Semenov will supervise a
series of command-and-staff exercises in the North Caucasus
Military District from 20 to 24 September, a spokesman for the
Ground Forces press center told ITAR-TASS on 15 September. The
agency noted that these exercises would be the first time that
control of all formations and units of all the armed forces
stationed in the district would be exercised by the district
commander, Colonel General Aleksei Mityukhin. -- Doug Clarke,
RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIK CEASE-FIRE AGREEMENT REACHED. Talks in Tehran mediated by
the UN, Russia, and Iran between the Tajik government and Islamic
opposition resulted in the signing on 17 September of an agreement
on a temporary cease-fire, Western and Russian agencies reported.
The cease-fire is to take effect as soon as UN observers can be
deployed to monitor it and last until 5 November; Iranian Foreign
Minister Ali Akbar Velayati expressed confidence that it would
hold. No agreement was reached on a political solution to the
ongoing civil war. Tajik government forces regained control of the
strategic Tavil-Dara Raion east of Dushanbe shortly before the
cease-fire was signed, according to ITAR-TASS quoting a Tajik
Interior Ministry official. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

KYRGYZSTAN TO HOLD REFERENDUM, PARLIAMENTARY ELECTIONS. Kyrgyz
President Askar Akaev will shortly issue decrees on the holding of
a referendum next month on amendments to the constitution that
will replace the existing parliament with a two-chamber
legislature, Interfax and AFP reported. Elections to the new
parliament will be held on 28 December. -- Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

EURASIAN UNION PROPOSAL BEING FLESHED OUT. At a special briefing
in Moscow reported by ITAR-TASS and Interfax on 15 September,
Kazakhstan's Moscow ambassador, Tair Mansurov, elaborated on
Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbaev's proposal--launched earlier
this year and officially submitted to CIS heads of state in
June--for a Eurasian union as a more advanced form of integration
among CIS states. Its prerequisites are deemed to lie in the
"economic interdependence, analogous political structures, public
mentality, and multiethnic makeup" common to ex-Soviet republics.
Disclaiming any intent to re-create either the USSR or the Russian
empire, the concept purports to allow for variable-speed
integration by individual countries into a "Union of Independent
and Equal States," one that would be "correlated to the activity
of the CIS." This union's functions would include the coordination
of economic policy, adoption and mandatory implementation of joint
reform programs, creation of common political institutions
including a central "consultative-deliberative" parliament, and
"an agreed approach" to military tasks and border defense. The
Russian government's reaction to the plan has been cautious, but
some influential official circles support it. The plan is to be
developed further at a forthcoming international conference in
Almaty on the integration of the "Eurasian space." -- Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

UN COMMANDER THREATENS "MEASURES" TO STOP SARAJEVO FIGHTING. The
BBC reported on 19 September that General Sir Michael Rose had
warned the Muslims and Serbs to end the fighting that began on 18
September. A spokesman for Rose said that the circumstances under
which the violence started were not fully clear but noted that the
fighting was the worst in the Bosnian capital for months. The
spokesman added that the "measures" could range from Rose's
writing letters to his ordering air strikes. Fighting was also
reported around Serb-held Doboj in northern Bosnia along the
Serbs' key supply corridor. Meanwhile, Serbs continue to block
water, gas, and power supplies to Sarajevo for the fifth
consecutive day. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

SERBS STEP UP "ETHNIC CLEANSING." Reuters reported on 17 September
that Serbs had expelled a further 700 Muslims from the Banja Luka
area, raising the total of those "ethnically cleansed" from there
since July to 6,000. CNN said on 19 September that the process was
continuing. The Banja Luka Serb leadership is also responsible for
the destruction of all the area's mosques, including two from the
sixteenth century that were registered with UNESCO. The town was a
major Ottoman administrative and commercial center. -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

IS BELGRADE SUPPLYING ARMS VIA KRAJINA? Serbia claims it is
blockading traffic to the Bosnian Serbs via the River Drina, but
the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported on 16 September that
helicopters were flying numerous missions across that border,
presumably in anticipation of the arrival of international
monitors. The paper said that 100 flights had been reported from
one site alone. The international "contact group" that same day
called for a tightening of measures against the Bosnian Serbs
while easing sanctions against Serbia-Montenegro for 100 days. On
17 September Hina reported that Croatia's foreign minister had
charged that Serbia was supplying arms to the Serb rebels in
Croatia, who are launching strikes on the Muslims in Bihac in
cooperation with Bosnian Serb forces. Belgrade has denied similar
charges made by the Bosnian government. Control of Bihac would
give the Serbs a key rail link that could facilitate the supply of
Bosnian Serbs by Serbia via Krajina. Some observers in Belgrade
have suggested that President Slobodan Milosevic may be seeking to
use the Banja Luka Serbian leadership, which could be supplied via
Bihac, against the Pale group headed by Radovan Karadzic. --
Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVENIAN FOREIGN MINISTER RESIGNS. Slovenian media and
international news agencies said on 16 September that Lojze
Peterle had given up the foreign minister's and deputy premier's
portfolios in protest over the nomination of a new speaker of
parliament by Prime Minister Janez Drnovsek. The prime minister
nominated Jozef Skolic, who is from Drnovsek's own party. Slovenia
is governed by a shaky three-party coalition, and Peterle
considered that the speaker's post should have gone to his
Christian Democrats rather than to Drnovsek's Liberal Democrats.
Peterle said that his party would decide on 20 September whether
to remain in the government. -- Patrick Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

UKRAINIAN PRESIDENT'S SPECIAL ENVOY IN CRIMEA. Interfax reported
on 17 September that Leonid Kuchma's special envoy to Crimea,
Deputy Prime Minister Yevgeny Marchuk, had held separate meetings
in Simferopol with Crimean President Yuri Meshkov and Crimean
Parliamentary Chairman Sergii Tsekov. Marchuk repeated Kuchma's
"zero option" proposal, under which the parliament would rescind
its amendment curbing Meshkov's powers and Meshkov would revoke
decrees disbanding the parliament and imposing presidential rule.
Crimean State Affairs Minister Viktor Minin told Interfax on 17
September that he believed the crisis was the "early beginning of
a power struggle in Ukraine." Minin said the Crimean parliament
had targeted Kuchma's supporters. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

NEW GOVERNMENT IN CRIMEA? Ukrainian media reported on 18 September
that Crimean President Yuri Meshkov had asked his deputy,
Volodymyr Korpov, to begin forming a new government. Korpov is
likely to succeed Yevgeni Saburov as deputy prime minister.
Saburov, who heads the cabinet, submitted his resignation on 15
September after the Crimean parliament had passed a vote of
no-confidence in the government. Meshkov has not yet formally
accepted Saburov's resignation. Kiev TV said on 18 September that
Korpov would hold negotiations with parliamentary groups on their
proposals for cabinet posts. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

CHOLERA OUTBREAK IN CRIMEA REPORTEDLY VERY SERIOUS. On 17
September Reuters reported Crimean Health Minister Yevgeny
Korolenko as saying that the cholera outbreak in Crimea was "very
serious." Two more deaths from cholera were reported in Crimea on
17 September, bringing the total to at least four in the two weeks
since the disease broke out. According to Korolenko, forty more
people are suffering from cholera. The health minister said that
one cause was the poor quality of the water and that uncontrolled
outdoor sales of beer and other drinks were contributing to the
spread of the disease. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

CRITICISM OF POLAND'S HAITI ROLE. Plans for Polish participation
in the US-led UN Haiti invasion force have stirred controversy in
Poland, both on account of the way the decision was made and its
implications, Polish media report. The Sejm knew nothing of
Poland's pledge of support for the operation until US President
Bill Clinton's 15 September address to the American nation.
Foreign Minister Andrzej Olechowski was hauled up before three
Sejm commissions on 16 September to explain himself. Deputies
belonging to the ruling postcommunist coalition accused the
president of impropriety in making a decision of such weight on
his own, and of holding "Polish blood cheaper than American
blood." They claimed the Polish public was against the
intervention in Haiti. Olechowski explained that Clinton had
called President Lech Walesa on 14 September. Walesa had expressed
general support for US policies but excluded any Polish
participation in the invasion as such. He stipulated that any
Polish role would be limited to aid in administrative
reconstruction, monitoring of elections, and peacekeeping after
the invasion. The issue was discussed by Walesa at a 15 September
meeting with the chiefs of the three security ministries, which
fall under his jurisdiction. A final decision is to be made by the
government on 19 September. -- Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH SEJM PASSES SECRETS ACT. The Sejm passed the official
secrets act after a third reading of the controversial bill on 15
September. The new provisions stipulate that anyone who gains
knowledge of classified information is bound to keep it secret,
under pain of imprisonment. The deputies rejected amendments that
would absolve a journalist from legal liability if the national
interest warranted publication of classified information, but it
approved an amendment giving access to classified information to a
secret service control commission, assuming that the Sejm agrees
to establish such a commission. The identities of security police
officials or agents will remain perpetually confidential, however,
preventing identification of secret police agents who were
involved in criminal activities before 1989. Most of the national
daily papers criticized the act as placing restrictions on the
freedom of speech and the free flow of information, as well as
limiting the controlling functions of the press. They indicated
that they would be prepared to ignore the new law in certain
cases. Walesa's legal spokesman, Lech Falandysz, did not exclude a
presidential veto, according to Zycie Warszawy of 19 September. --
Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK PRIME MINISTER ON THE ECONOMY. In an interview with CTK on
16 September, Jozef Moravcik said that the transformation of the
Slovak economy "must be completed" and that it should be continued
after the forthcoming parliamentary elections, regardless of their
results. In Moravck's opinion, it was necessary to finish the
current transitional period and speed up the integration into
European structures. The prime minister said that Slovakia's GNP
had grown by 5.3% in the second quarter of 1994 and that he
expected it to increase by 4% in 1995. He also pointed out that
Slovakia's foreign debt was the lowest in the region. In an
interview with the Austrian Press Agency on the same day, Moravcik
said that "the Slovak government stands by its privatization
program and does not think it is in danger" after recent threats
by the leaders of the opposition Movement for a Democratic
Slovakia to nationalize property privatized by Moravcik's
government. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SLOVAK PARTY LEADERS' PREELECTION DEBATE. On 18 September,
speaking during the last televised debate of Slovakia's party
leaders before the elections (scheduled for 30 September and 1
October), Democratic Left Party Chairman Peter Weiss said that he
was in favor of creating "a broad coalition" after the elections
rather than cooperating with Vladimir Meciar's Movement for a
Democratic Slovakia. Weiss said that only such a broad coalition
could lead the country out of the current crisis and that his and
Meciar's parties differed too deeply over economic policies and
other issues. A leader of the coalition of three ethnic Hungarian
parties, Pal Csaky, said the coalition was in favor of creating
three regions in the south of Slovakia, where ethnic Hungarians
would be in a majority. Slovak National Party Chairman Jan Slota
argued that Hungarian minority leaders were seeking
destabilization and the secession of southern Slovakia. The
proposal on the regions was also rejected by Slovak Prime Minister
Moravcik, Weiss, and Mikulas Dzurinda, a leader of the Christian
Democratic Movement. Meciar argued that the current government had
made itself too dependent on the ethnic Hungarian parties'
support. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

PREELECTION OPINION POLLS IN SLOVAKIA. According to an opinion
poll released by the Slovak Statistical Office on 16 September,
Vladimir Meciar's Movement for a Democratic Slovakia would win the
elections with 26.6% of the popular vote if the elections were
held now. The MDS is followed by the Party of the Democratic Left,
with 20%, and by the coalition of Hungarian ethnic parties, with
11%. The Christian Democratic Movement of Jan Carnogursky would
receive 9.1% of the vote, while current Prime Minister Jozef
Moravcik's Democratic Union would command 8.4%. The last of the
six parties that would top the 5% threshold necessary for winning
seats in the parliament is the Association of Workers, with 5.9%.
The Slovak National Party's has lost more than 3% of its
supporters since the previous poll and would now win 3.2% of the
vote. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN PRESIDENT VISITS CHINA. President Arpad Goncz, in China
for a four-day state visit, met with President Jiang Zemin and
Prime Minister Li Peng to discuss bilateral and international
issues, MTI reported on 16 September. According to Goncz, the two
countries' views on human rights differed but China's human rights
record should not hinder cooperation in other fields, such as
trade and Hungarian participation in Chinese government projects.
-- Alfred Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARIAN PRIME MINISTER ON THE ECONOMY. Gyula Horn speaking on
Hungarian Television on 18 September, said that the country's
economic situation was "not too rosy." Some 600 billion forint and
almost 1 million jobs had been lost during the privatization
process, domestic and foreign debts amounted to 600 billion forint
(or 35% of total expenditures), and an illegal economy was
estimated to account for 25-35% of the national income. -- Alfred
Reisch, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIAN PRESIDENT IN TURKEY. On 17 September Ion Iliescu paid a
one-day official visit to Istanbul, according to Radio Bucharest.
Iliescu discussed with his Turkish counterpart Suleyman Demirel
and other high-ranking officials a range of bilateral and regional
issues, including ways of boosting economic and political
relations between the two countries, as well as Black Sea regional
cooperation and the situation in Bosnia. Iliescu was accompanied
by Romania's Foreign Minister Teodor Melescanu, Trade Minister
Cristian Ionescu, and Transportation Minister Aurel Novac. The
visit was the last in a series of regular contacts between
Romanian and Turkish officials. Iliescu and Demirel had previously
met in Bucharest in March of this year. -- Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL
Inc.

BULGARIAN PRESIDENT AND PARLIAMENT CLASH. On 16 September
President Zheleyu Zhelev threatened parliament with rejecting the
outcome of expected parliamentary elections if the parliament
changed the constitution to allow deputies to stay in session
during the campaign. The Bulgarian government resigned in the
middle of September and the leaders of the two largest parties
want early parliamentary elections. In another development, the
leftist majority in the parliament defied the Bulgarian
Constitutional Court by replacing eleven members of a council that
controls legal appointments. The Constitutional Court had ruled on
15 September that council members could not be replaced before
their five-year mandate had run out. The leader of the opposition
Union of Democratic Forces, Filip Dimitrov, said the vote was
illegal. -- Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

BULGARIAN LABOR CAMP TRIAL WITNESS FOUND DEAD. A police spokesman
told journalists on 16 September in Sofia that a key witness in a
multiple murder trial of former guards at a Bulgarian labor camp,
the former actress Nadia Dunkin, had been found dead. The body of
Dunkin, who had been a prisoner at the camp where opponents of the
communist regime were sent from 1959 to 1962, was found in her
Sofia apartment. The body showed traces of violence. Dunkin was
one of the main witnesses in the trial of three Bulgarians charged
with murdering fourteen political prisoners at a camp near Lovetch
in central Bulgaria. An official of the Bulgarian judiciary said
on 16 September that Dunkin's death would not lead to the
postponement of the trial, which opened in 1993. -- Jiri Pehe,
RFE/RL Inc.

ALBANIA LAUNCHES MAJOR CAMPAIGN AGAINST CHOLERA. International
news agencies reported on 16 September that the Albanian
authorities had postponed school openings for two weeks to help
prevent the spread of a recent cholera outbreak that has killed
five people and affected at least 300 others. A clean-up campaign
was held in Tirana over the weekend, and health officials have
warned people to drink only boiled or bottled water. -- Patrick
Moore, RFE/RL Inc.

MOLDOVA SEEKING CONVERSION ASSISTANCE. Moldovan officials told
Moldpres on 16 September that the government was seeking foreign
assistance for the conversion of former Soviet military-industrial
plants in Moldova, which are now "slowly dying." The fourteen
plants, mostly equipped with Soviet military technology of the
late 1980s, produced mainly measuring instruments, communications
equipment, and components and spare parts for the equipment of the
former USSR's navy, air force, air defense, and armored forces.
The European Union has earmarked an initial loan to launch the
conversion of six of those plants. Moldova is also interested in
benefiting from the internationally-assisted conversion programs
for CIS states, the officials said. -- Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

MOSCOW TO DEFEND INTERESTS OF RUSSIANS IN THE BALTICS. On 16
September a senior Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman, Yurii
Fokin, reiterated his country's policy of using all civilized
methods to defend the interests of ethnic Russians and
Russian-speakers, including retired servicemen, in the Baltic
States, Interfax reported. Fokin's remarks came after Russian
Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev had raised the issue at the recent
meeting of foreign ministers of the Barents Sea countries in
Norway. Accusing Latvia of having a discriminatory citizenship
law, Fokin called on both Latvia and Estonia to start a dialogue
with the ethnic Russians there. He added that economic sanctions
against the Baltics States were not imminent. -- Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL Inc.

CSCE AND UN OFFICIALS ON HUMAN RIGHTS IN THE BALTIC STATES. At the
meeting in Prague last week of CSCE senior officials, High
Commissioner for Minority Problems Max Van Der Stoel appealed to
other countries to help Estonia and Latvia create
language-training centers for Russian-speakers. Noting that an
examination in the local language was among the requirements for
citizenship, he said language-training facilities were
insufficient and the state budgets were limited. He also suggested
aid for developing radio and television programs for
Russian-speakers learning the local language. He pointed out that
many problems remained in Latvia's and Estonia's relations with
Russia but did not expand, according to RFE/RL's correspondent
reporting from Prague on 16 September. On 17 September the
coordinator of the UN development program in Lithuania, Jorgen
Lissner, told BNS that while there were no grounds for accusing
Lithuania of human rights violations, in some cases the
international standards were not fully met in that country. He
explained that in its constitution Lithuania reserved the right to
limit on its territory the rights of citizens of other countries.
Lissner also said that there were no women among the members of
the current Lithuanian cabinet of ministers, which, he said, was
indicative of shortcomings in observing the equal rights of sexes.
-- Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

[As of 1200 CET] (Compiled by Penny Morvant and Maggie Evling)
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
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