Wherever there is love, there is peace. - Burmese proverb
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 177, 16 September 1994

                              RUSSIA

ENLARGING VERSUS "CONTAINING" NATO. Reacting to US Vice President
Albert Gore's and German Defense Minister Volker Ruehe's recent
proposals on enlarging NATO, a Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman
said at a briefing on 15 September reported by Interfax that the
enlargement of membership or responsibility "may lead to a
deterioration of the situation in Europe and a crisis of
confidence . . . revitalize bloc structures, and provoke a new
split in Europe." "Containment of NATO would be more consistent
with European security," Interfax quoted him as saying. He
reaffirmed Russia's support for NATO's Partnership for Peace
program.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

PLAN TO DILUTE NATO ROLE UNPOPULAR AT CSCE MEETING. At a meeting
of the CSCE's Committee of Senior Officials, which opened in
Prague on 14 September, Russia submitted its previously publicized
plan to reorganize the CSCE into a coordinating forum placed above
NATO, the Western European Union, and CIS structures in security
affairs. The plan's main feature is the creation within the CSCE
of an executive council of 10 countries, five of whom, including
Russia, would be permanent members with a veto power. They would
oversee major security decisions by those three organizations, of
which only NATO is a military reality at this time and is seen as
the plan's actual target. As expected, delegations from both NATO
and non-NATO countries have opposed the proposal, which would, in
their view, enable Russia to influence NATO decisions. The
meeting's chairman, Paolo Bruni of Italy, saw "no chance" of
approval, RFE/RL's correspondent reported on 15 September. (See
the CIS section below for further Russian proposals at the CSCE
meeting.) Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

MARTIAL LAW INTRODUCED IN CHECHNYA. Two television transmitters
near Grozny were blown up by a magnetic mine during the night of
14-15 September, temporarily disrupting government programs,
Western and Russian agencies reported; Interfax cited Chechen
Prosecutor-General Usman Imaev as claiming that the perpetrators
were supporters of the former chairman of the Russian parliament,
Ruslan Khasbulatov. On 15 September President Dzhokhar Dudaev
signed a decree introducing martial law and a curfew throughout
Chechnya beginning on 16 September, for an indefinite period. Also
on 15 September, Khasbulatov issued an appeal to the Chechen
population to reject confrontation and embark on negotiations
aimed at defusing the situation peacefully, according to
ITAR-TASS. Interfax cited opposition spokesmen as claiming that
Dudaev's troops were preparing to attack forces loyal to
Provisional Council Chairman Umar Avturkhanov in Nadterechnyi
Raion and Khasbulatov's headquarters in Tolstoi-Yurt. Liz Fuller,
RFE/RL Inc.

GAIDAR LOSES LIBEL SUIT TO ZHIRINOVSKY, ANDRONOV SUES YELTSIN.
Egor Gaidar, father of Russia's market reforms and the leader of
Russia's Democratic Choice, has lost the libel suit brought
against him by a hard-line fellow-deputy of the State
Duma--Vladimir Zhirinovsky, head of the Liberal Democratic
Party--ITAR-TASS reported on 15 September. In an article published
in the proreform daily Izvestiya earlier this year, Gaidar had
termed Zhirinovsky a "fascist." On 15 September a Moscow district
court ruled this term libelous and instructed Gaidar and Izvestiya
to pay Zhirinovsky 500,000 rubles (approximately $ 240) each. On
the same day, Russian Television's "Vesti" newscast reported,
another Moscow court had to hear a similar case brought against
President Boris Yeltsin himself. The journalist Iona Andronov, a
member of the parliament dissolved by Yeltsin's decree in
September 1993, had sued Yeltsin for libel for having branded him
a "fascist" in the English-language edition of his memoirs.
According to "Vesti," Yeltsin neglected to attend the first
hearing in Kuntsevo district court.  Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

PROSECUTOR'S OFFICE PROTESTS VARENNIKOV'S ACQUITTAL. The Office of
the Russian Prosecutor-General has lodged a formal protest against
the verdict of the Military Collegium of the Russian Supreme Court
in the trial of General Valentin Varennikov, Radio Rossii reported
on 14 September. On 11 August the court had ruled that in August
1991 Varennikov, at that time a Soviet deputy minister of defense,
had not committed any crime in taking an active part in the
attempted coup against USSR President Mikhail Gorbachev--thus
acceding to the request of the prosecutor at the trial, who had
urged that Varennikov be acquitted. Verdicts of the Supreme Court
are not subject to appeal; so the Russian Prosecutor's Office is
here exercising its right of "surveillance," requesting that the
case be reviewed by the Presidium of the Russian Supreme Court,
which has the power to initiate a new trial by other judges of the
Military Collegium. Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL Inc.

OPPOSITION PREPARES FOR ANNIVERSARY OF OCTOBER EVENTS. The leaders
of the nationalist and communist opposition said that they would
like to mark the anniversary of the anti-Yeltsin parliamentary
revolt of 1993 by major demonstrations and meetings in Moscow,
ITAR-TASS reported on 15 September. The demonstrations are planned
for the period from 21 September to 4 October in the city center
as well as near the Ostankino television center and the building
of the former Supreme Soviet, which is currently the residence of
the Russian government. The opposition also stated that it had
begun to collect signatures to a petition calling for preterm
presidential elections. Such elections are also on the agenda of
the congress of the "irreconcilable" opposition that is taking
place in Kaliningrad, behind closed doors. It is to elect a leader
for the anti-Yeltsin alliance; former Vice President Aleksandr
Rutskoi and the leader of the Communist Party of the Russian
Federation, Gennadii Zyuganov, are considered to be the main
candidates.  Victor Yasmann, RFE/RL Inc.

CALL TO CLOSE DOWN OPPOSITION WEEKLY ZAVTRA. The Judicial Chamber
on Information Disputes has urged the Russian State Committee on
the Press to initiate proceedings to close down the opposition
weekly newspaper Zavtra (Tomorrow), Russian news agencies reported
on 15 September. Edited by the ultranationalist writer Aleksandr
Prokhanov, Zavtra is the successor to the similarly militant
newspaper Den (Day), which was closed down by the authorities in
the aftermath of the October 1993 confrontation between Yeltsin
and the Russian parliament. Zavtra is on record as having
advocated military rebellion against the Yeltsin regime, as well
as the execution without trial of certain leading democratic
politicians. If the Press Committee agrees to the request, it is
required by law to submit the matter for judicial review. In the
past, however, the courts have tended to reject requests to close
down opposition newspapers. The Judicial Chamber was set up last
fall by presidential decree; it is composed of lawyers and
journalists appointed to it by the president.  Julia Wishnevsky,
RFE/RL Inc.

LEBED ATTACKS ALBRIGHT, THANKS MEDIA. Lieutenant General Aleksandr
Lebed, the commander of Russia's 14th Army, described as "boorish"
a recent call by US Permanent Representative to the UN Madeleine
Albright for the withdrawal of that army from Moldova. In an
interview with the liberal Nezavisimaya gazeta on 15 September he
urged "sending all unwanted 'advisers' away and starting to live
by our own wits." He had previously attacked Albright in the
progovernment Rossiiskaya gazeta of 7 September. Mindful of the
recent buildup of his image by liberal and progovernment media,
Lebed told Nezavisimaya gazeta that he wanted once more to
"express gratitude publicly to the press for the support
rendered." Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

GRACHEV ON RUSSIAN TROOP PRESENCE IN TAJIKISTAN, ABKHAZIA.
Speaking at a press briefing in Voronezh on 14 September, Russian
Defense Minister Pavel Grachev proposed that the Russian border
troops currently deployed along the Tajik-Afghan border should be
replaced by regular army troops. He said that if the Tajik
leadership assented, Russia would "significantly strengthen the
troops in the region" in order to resist "a real external
provocation," Interfax reported on 15 September. Grachev likewise
argued that the Russian peacekeeping troops that had been deployed
in Abkhazia in June for an initial period of six months might have
to remain there longer, given that friendship between the Abkhaz
and Georgians "cannot be restored quickly," according to a Reuters
report of 15 September citing ITAR-TASS.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

TURKEY READY TO PROVIDE KARABAKH PEACEKEEPERS. Turkey is prepared
to provide a contingent of troops to form part of an international
peacekeeping force in Nagorno-Karabakh, the head of the Turkish
delegation to the CSCE told an RFE/RL correspondent in Prague on
15 September. The Turkish leadership has consistently opposed
Russian efforts to gain a monopoly on peacekeeping in the
Transcaucasus, and it announced in June that it would set up a
logistical center in Erzerum to serve as a supply base for such a
CSCE force.  Roland Eggleston & Liz Fuller, RFE/RL Inc.

                               CIS

RUSSIAN PEACEKEEPING SCHEME SHELVED AT CSCE . . . At the meeting
of the CSCE's Committee of Senior Officials (see the Russia
section above), Russia has replaced its earlier plan for a CSCE
framework for its "peacekeeping" operations in the CIS with a new
proposal minimizing the CSCE's role. Bruni, the meeting's
chairman, said that there was "nothing to debate" in the new
Russian proposal, RFE/RL's correspondent reported on 15 September.
The previous Russian plan contained some ground rules and time
limitations for Russian "peacekeeping" and left room for the CSCE
to monitor those operations and actively participate in the
negotiations to settle local conflicts, in exchange for political
endorsement and financial support for Russian operations. The new
proposal, however, is far less specific and involves only a loose
link to the CSCE, leaving broad scope for unilateral Russian
action, according to delegates from both NATO and neutral
countries. They regard the new proposal as reflecting a growing
Russian assertiveness in Europe and the CIS, the correspondent
reported.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . BUT RECAST FOR UN. A Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman said
at the above mentioned briefing on 15 September, reported by
Interfax, that President Yeltsin and Foreign Minister Andrei
Kozyrev would submit proposals to the session of the UN General
Assembly that will be held shortly; these will be concerned with
Russia-UN "interaction" and "concrete cooperation" in maintaining
"peace and stability" and settling conflicts on "CIS territory."
The spokesman indicated that Russia would seek UN acceptance of
the CIS as a framework for "regional" peacekeeping and "an optimum
balance of political and financial responsibility" with the UN for
its peacekeeping operations. Somewhat incongruously, on the
financial issue Russia "will firmly defend the principle of zero
real growth in the UN's budget." Russia hopes for coordination
with CIS countries during the session, the spokesman said.
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CRIMEAN PRIME MINISTER TENDERS RESIGNATION . . . International
media reported on 15 September that acting Crimean Prime Minister
Yevgeny Saburov had offered his resignation to President Yuri
Meshkov, saying he was unable to work amid the region's
constitutional crisis. The crisis started on 11 September when
Meshkov disbanded parliament and imposed presidential rule after
the parliament passed an amendment curbing his powers. Saburov
said Meshkov was opposed to his departure. Saburov also addressed
the parliament, which had been allowed to reconvene on 13
September but continues to be locked in a power struggle with
Meshkov. In his speech to the parliament, Saburov hinted that he
intended to step down, saying that he could stay only if specific
conditions were met and observed. "I do not think these conditions
can be fulfilled," he said. The Saburov's appointment was one of
the Crimean parliament's chief complaints in its dispute with
Meshkov.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

. . . AND CRIMEAN PARLIAMENT PASSES NO-CONFIDENCE VOTE. On 15
September the Crimean parliament passed a motion of no-confidence
in the Crimean government by a vote of fifty-eight to twenty-four
with three abstentions. The deputies asked Crimean President Yuri
Meshkov to approve the resignation of the government within seven
days.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

SIMFEROPOL COUNCIL AGAINST FURTHER CONFRONTATION. ITAR-TASS
reported on 15 September that the city council of Simferopol, the
Crimean capital, had urged the Crimean parliament and the
president to avoid further confrontation. A statement adopted by
the council said that continued confrontation between the
executive and legislative branches of power in Crimea might lead
to acts of civil disobedience, a situation that would be "fraught
with unpredictable consequences." According to ITAR-TASS, similar
sessions, also called to discuss the Crimean constitutional
conflict, were held by local councils in many other towns and
districts of Crimea.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

UKRAINIAN PARLIAMENT ACTS ON SEVASTOPOL. Ukraine's new parliament
opened its fall session in Kiev on 15 September, acting
immediately to rescind a decision by local authorities in the
Crimean city of Sevastopol proclaiming the city Russian territory.
Reuters reports that deputies voted by 303 to five to declare the
August proclamation by Sevastopol city council null and void.
During the debate, some nationalist deputies proposed that the
autonomous status that Crimea was granted by Ukraine after the
collapse of the Soviet Union be abolished. Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

UKRAINE STALLS ON NUCLEAR TREATY. Interfax of 15 September
reported the comments of three high Ukrainian officials, all of
whom indicated that Ukraine was not planning to sign the Nuclear
Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) in the near future. President
Leonid Kravchuk signed a Trilateral Statement with Presidents Bill
Clinton and Boris Yeltsin on 14 January 1994 pledging that Ukraine
would accede to the treaty as a nonnuclear-weapons state in the
shortest possible time, but the Ukrainian parliament has balked at
carrying out this pledge. On 15 September Alexander Moroz, the
speaker of the parliament, has called for an international
conference on the NPT to be held in Kiev at the beginning of next
year to help Ukraine decide whether to join the NPT. Vladimir
Mukhin, chairman of the parliament's defense and security
commission, told a Moscow briefing that Ukraine was not ready to
join the treaty before the end of this year.  Doug Clarke, RFE/RL
Inc.

SERBIAN RADICAL PARTY ON MONITORING OF SANCTIONS. Reacting to news
that international sanctions monitors would be placed along the
Drina River--Serbia's border with Bosnia--the party's leader,
Vojislav Seselj, implied that he and his followers would work to
undermine the sanctions, saying that "if it's necessary, we'll
just drink the whole Drina dry" to outwit the observers. The first
contingent of sanctions observers will probably take up their
posts on 16 September. Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

BOSNIAN COMMANDER SAYS TOO EARLY TO LIFT SANCTIONS. On 15
September AFP reported that General Rasim Delic had said, after a
five-day visit to Washington, that it was too early for the
international community to suggest that sanctions against the rump
Yugoslavia could be eased or lifted, because Belgrade was still
supplying the Bosnian Serb forces.  Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

FIGHTING IN BOSNIA INTENSIFIES. On 15 September agencies reported
that fighting had been intensifying around Brcko in northeastern
Bosnia. On the same day Hina reported that fighting involving Serb
and Bosnian Muslim forces in the area of Konjic, some fifty miles
southwest of the Bosnian capital Sarajevo, had been "fierce." Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

NEW CABINET FOR RUMP YUGOSLAVIA. On 16 September Borba and
Politika gave details of the new cabinet, announced the previous
day, and headed by Prime Minister Radoje Kontic. Several of the
most important offices continue to be held by people loyal to
Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic. They include Vladislav
Jovanovic, who retains his foreign affairs port-folio, and Pavle
Bulatovic, who continues as defense minister. Among the new faces
is minister of internal affairs Vukasin Jokanovic.  Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

CLASSES RESUME IN CROATIAN SCHOOLS. On 15 September Hina reported
that classes in some 90% of the country's primary schools and 67%
of the secondary schools had resumed. A representative of the
School Teachers' Union, however, said that teachers would continue
the strike over their wages and working conditions Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH SEJM APPROVES GOVERNMENT'S AGRICULTURAL POLICY. The Sejm
approved on 15 September a policy paper containing the outlines of
a six-year plan to modernize Polish agriculture. The plan, which
is part of the government's "Strategy for Poland" economic
program, posits the survival of only some 700,000-800,000 private
farms, which will manage to modernize and increase production to a
level enabling their owners to live off the land. The remaining,
inefficient farmers will be able to retain their farms for their
private needs but should seek a living in other professions. To
this end, the government intends to provide means and incentives
for the creation of jobs in the agricultural and local
infrastructure. The opposition parties criticized the paper,
claiming that the plans were based on incorrect or insufficient
data, and lacked proper estimates of the costs involved.  Anna
Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

POLISH BANK CHIEF ASSERTS INDEPENDENCE. Polish National Bank
Chairman Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz, appearing at question time in
the Sejm on 15 September, defended her decision to reduce the rate
of devaluation of the zloty, against criticism from Finance
Minister Grzegorz Kolodko. She expressed concern at attempts to
undermine her sphere of jurisdiction, which, she said, was an
essential criterion of the central bank's independence of
political pressure. President Lech Walesa sat in on the session in
a gesture of support for Gronkiewicz-Waltz whom he had recommended
for the post in 1982. He later told journalists that he was "on
her side" in the conflict and that she enjoyed his full
confidence, PAP reports.  Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

"WEIMAR TRIANGLE" IN BAMBERG. The Polish, French, and German
foreign ministers, Andrzej Olechowski, Alain Jupp~, and Klaus
Kinkel, held the fourth meeting of the "Weimar Triangle" in
Bamberg on 14 and 15 September. They discussed European
integration, cooperation between the EU and its associate member
states in the areas of internal affairs and security, and arms
control within the framework of the Conference on Security and
Cooperation in Europe. The three ministers drafted a joint
declaration on conventional arms control in Europe in preparation
for the forthcoming CSCE meeting in Budapest. Referring to recent
Russian suggestions on changes in the status of the CSCE, Kinkel
said that he could not conceive that the CSCE would exercise
supremacy with regard to NATO. On his return to Warsaw, Olechowski
told PAP that he had discerned signs of "a new atmosphere that was
to Poland's advantage" among top Western leaders.  Anna
Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL Inc.

CZECH REPUBLIC SIGNS AGREEMENT WITH EUROPEAN INVESTMENT BANK.
Czech Finance Minister Ivan Kocarnik and the vice chairman of the
European Investment Bank, Wolfgang Roth, signed an agreement in
Prague on 15 September under which the Czech Republic will be
eligible for the bank's credits. The bank was set up by the
European Union to provide its members and East European countries
with loans necessary for financing long-term projects.  Jiri Pehe,
RFE/RL Inc.

CSCE MEETING IN PRAGUE. A three-day meeting of representatives
from member countries of the Conference on Cooperation and
Security in Europe (CSCE) started in Prague on 14 September. The
meeting's chairman, Paolo Bruni, told a press conference on 14
September that the main objective of the meeting was to prepare
the December summit of the CSCE. Other themes on the meeting's
agenda include conflict prevention, the Balkan crisis, and the
armed conflict in Nagorno-Karabakh.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

TRANSPORTATION MINISTERS MEET IN SLOVAKIA. The ministers of
transportation of Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Austria,
Hungary, and Slovenia met in Bratislava on 15 September to discuss
the protection of environment, safety in transportation, and other
issues. The chief adviser of the European Union Commission for
Transportation, Ottakar Hahn, said Slovakia was currently "taking
serious steps aimed at harmonizing its transportation policy with
recommendations of the European Union" and that Slovakia could
become "a key country in connecting the North and the South as
well as the East and the West of Europe." Hahn said that the
question of border crossings remained the main point of
contention, but that the EU was willing to offer financial
assistance to solve such problems.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL Inc.

CONSUMER PRICES IN HUNGARY. According to data released by the
Central Statistical Office on 15 September, the Hungarian consumer
price index rose by 1.4% in August compared with July, bringing
the annual price rise to 19.5%, MTI reports. By comparison, in
August 1993 consumer prices rose by 1.8% and the yearly price rise
amounted to 22.3%. Prices rose above average in August 1994 as the
price of food increased by 24.5%, the cost of services rose by
20.7%, alcoholic beverage and tobacco prices grew by 19.9%,
household energy prices rose by 11.3%, and the price of durable
consumer goods increased by 12.1%. A four-member household now
needs 53,800 forint (about $580) a month to meet the minimum
standard of living, compared to 45,000 forint in 1993.  Edith
Oltay, RFE/RL Inc.

HUNGARY'S COMPENSATION PROGRAM. According to the Office of
Compensation, 1,507,438 Hungarians received some form of
compensation under the country's compensation program for victims
of property expropriation and political oppression, MTI reports.
The value of the compensation vouchers the office issued thus far
exceeds 110 billion forint. Under the first law on compensation
over 817,000 people received vouchers and an average of 67,000
forint pro person. The law on property compensation granted some
75,000 people vouchers worth 10.5 billion forint with each person
receiving an average of 139,000 forint. Vouchers in the value of
44 billion forint were issued to 177,482 persons who had been
deprived of their freedom under communism with each person
receiving an average of 247,000 forint.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL Inc.

CHANGES AT HUNGARIAN RADIO. Radio chief Janos Sziranyi told a
press conference on 15 September that in the past two months the
129 radio employees who had been fired by the previous management
had been rehired, MTI reports. He announced that the radio will
institute program changes effective 3 October. At that time,
several programs terminated by the previous management will be
restarted, and the number of programs dealing with everyday
problems and sociological studies increased. Radio Kossuth will
continue to serve as the major news station, Radio Petofi will
continue to focus on entertainment, and Radio Bartok on classical
music programs.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL Inc.

ROMANIAN PRESIDENT REJECTS SELF-RULE FOR ETHNIC MINORITIES. In an
apparent reference to Romania's large Hungarian minority,
President Ion Iliescu said on 15 September that territorial
autonomy for ethnic groups in Romania could threaten national and
regional security. He added that the "adventurous projects to
create enclaves and autonomous regions . . . could only aggravate
inter-ethnic problems." Iliescu's remarks came in his address to a
two-day international conference devoted to "Central Europe and
Its National Minorities" held in Bucharest. The conference is
attended by high-ranking Romanian officials, including Foreign
Minister Teodor Melescanu, Chamber of Deputies Chairman Adrian
Nastase and Senate Chairman Oliviu Gherman, as well as by
parliamentarians from European countries and representatives of
the Council of Europe. Last month, leaders of the Hungarian
Democratic Federation of Romania called again for a special status
for the regions of Covasna and Harghita, where compact Magyar
populations live.  Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL Inc.

SECOND CHOLERA CASE REPORTED IN ROMANIA. A second case of cholera
was reported on 15 September. The sick person is a 64-year-old man
from the town of Medgidia, in the Dobrudja region.  Dan Ionescu,
RFE/RL Inc.

BULGARIAN SOCIALIST PARTY DECLINES TO FORM GOVERNMENT. On 14
September AFP quoted BSP spokesperson Nora Ananyeva as saying: "We
are not afraid of governing the country. However, Bulgaria needs a
strong and resolute government, which would be impossible with the
current parliament." Zhelev will now meet with other party leaders
about forming a government. The resignation of Premier Lyuben
Berov's cabinet was accepted by the Bulgarian National Assembly on
8 September.  Stan Markotich, RFE/RL Inc.

ESTONIAN PRESIDENT MEETS THE POPE. Pope John Paul II received
Estonian President Lennart Meri in a private audience on 15
September, BNS reported; they discussed developments in, and
regarding, eastern Europe, and other topics. Meri thanked the Pope
for his support for the Baltic states. The Pope said that the
Catholic Church in Estonia wished to work closely with all sectors
of the society for the strengthening of freedom and peace and that
Estonia was "an important point of passage between eastern and
western Europe." Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

NEW GOVERNMENT IN LATVIA. On 15 September the Saeima approved the
government proposed by Prime Minister designate Maris Gailis. Like
the previous government, most members of the Gailis's team come
from Latvia's Way and many of them held posts in the cabinet of
outgoing Prime Minister Valdis Birkavs, who has now become Foreign
Minister as well as one of the three deputy premiers. Gailis
indicated that there would be no major changes from the program
that was earlier hammered out by Latvia's Way and followed by the
previous government. Serving as his other deputies will be
Minister of Finance Andris Piebalgs and Minister of Education and
Science Janis Vaivods. Heading the others ministries are Janis
Zvanitajs (economics); Janis Trapans, formerly of the RFE/RL
Research Institute (defense); Girts Kristovskis (interior); Juris
Iesalnieks (environmental protection and regional development);
Romans Apsitis (justice); Janis Dripe (culture); Arijs Udris
(agriculture); Andris Berzins (welfare); and Andris Gutmanis
(transportation).  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL Inc.

LITHUANIA SIGNS ECONOMIC ACCORDS WITH KAZAKHSTAN. Lithuanian Prime
Minister Adolfas Slezevicius and his Kazakh counterpart Sergei
Tereshchenko signed an agreement on the protections and promotion
of investments in Kazakstan's capital Alma Ata on 14 September.
The prime ministers and the heads of central banks also signed an
agreement on settlements between Lithuanian and Kazakh
enterprises. Slezevicius told the press that Kazakhstan accounted
for about 3 percent of Lithuania's trade turnover, a figure which
could be increased. He said that bilateral trade was hampered by
the discriminatory railway tariffs established by Russia.
Tereshchenko said Kazakhstan was interested in broadening trade
with Lithuania, especially in the processing of Kazakh raw
materials, such as Kazakh oil, and in the joint utilization of the
port of Klaipeda and Kazakhstan's Caspian ports. He attached
priority to the establishment of joint electronics,
light-industry, and food processing enterprises, BNS reported on
15 September. Dzintra Bungs

[As of 1200 CET] Compiled by Eileen Downing and Maggie Evling
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
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