The only thing one knows about human nature is that it changes. - Oscar Wilde
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 174, 13 September 1994

                              RUSSIA

RUSSIA TO KEEP UP PRESSURE ON ARMS TREATY. Russia intends to keep
fighting for changes to the 1990 Conventional Armed Forces in
Europe Treaty, according to an interview with a high-ranking
official of the Ministry of Defense published by Interfax on 12
September. While Russia is willing to live with the overall limits
assigned to it by the treaty, it has been demanding more weapons
in its flank regions--the Leningrad and North Caucasus Military
Districts--than the treaty allows. The diplomat termed these flank
quotas unbalanced and discriminatory. Defense Minister Pavel
Grachev indicated that, if Russia were given concessions on the
flanks, it would be prepared to cut considerably the number of
troops and arms in Kaliningrad Oblast. By a quirk in the terms of
the treaty, Russia is allowed to keep large amounts of military
equipment in this region--equipment that was planned for the
Russian divisions in Eastern Europe when the treaty was being
negotiated.  Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

NO BASES FOR RETURNING TROOPS. During a visit to Smolensk on 12
September Grachev described two divisions repatriated to Russia's
Moscow Military District as having to move "into an empty field."
According to ITAR-TASS, he has released four billion rubles to
build a compound near Yelnya for the 144th Motorized Rifle
Division, which has been withdrawn from Estonia. A tank division
relocating to Boguchary needed similar assistance. Grachev said
that, while the Moscow Military District had once been a source of
reinforcements for frontline troops, its units would in the future
have "autonomous combat assignments." Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

STATE POLICY ON BROADCASTING A PRESSING PROBLEM. A conference of
the International Committee on Broadcasting Policies opened in St.
Petersburg on 12 September, according to the Russian TV program
"Vesti." The committee was founded four years ago by former US
President Jimmy Carter and the head of the Soviet Union of
Journalists, Eduard Sagalaev, who both attended the conference.
The meeting is taking place amid rumors revealing growing public
concern over the future of Russian broadcasting. The chairman of
the State Duma Committee on the Press, Mikhail Poltoranin; the
acting chairman of the State Press Committee, Vladimir Volodin;
Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin; and even President Yeltsin
himself are regularly being accused of seeking to attack the
freedom of the press. On 10 September Novaya ezhednevnaya gazeta
cited "usually well-informed sources" as saying that Yeltsin had
offered the post of chairman of the Ostankino radio and television
company, currently occupied by Aleksandr Yakovlev, to Leonid
Kravchenko. Kravchenko--who had held this post until the August
1991 abortive coup and who is generally considered to have been
one of the most conservative officials to have served under
Mikhail Gorbachev--has reportedly accepted the offer, on condition
that Russian Television, which is currently independent, be
subordinated to him as well, by merging it with Ostankino
Television.  Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

ANOTHER MAJOR DEFENSE PLANT IN TROUBLE. Interfax reported on 9
September that the missile electronics manufacturer Avtomatika, in
Ekaterinburg, had shut down its missile systems factory and
furloughed nearly 7,000 of its 15,000 workers until 1995. The
company developed the electronics for the Buran space shuttle. The
immediate cause of the closure was the plant's failure to pay its
water bills, which led to its water supply being shut off.
Avtomatika has not been paid by the Russian Ministry of Defense
for work it has completed. The company will continue to
manufacture consumer goods.  Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

PROFIT FROM THE ARMS TRADE. Marshal Evgenii Shaposhnikov,
President Boris Yeltsin's representative with the Rosvooruzheniye
arms trading company, told Interfax on 12 September that Russia
had received $2.2 billion of profits in 1993 from selling arms and
expected to do better in 1994. He said that, while the Soviet
Union had delivered about $15 billion worth of arms overseas in
the mid-1980s, much of the deliveries had been on 50-year credit
terms. Many of the recipients had built up huge debts that they
were now trying to pay off in spoiled wine or bananas,
Shaposhnikov complained.  Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

CONGRESS OF RUSSIAN LAWYERS OPENS IN MOSCOW. According to Russian
Television news reports of 12 September, the aim of the Congress
of Russian Lawyers, which opened in Moscow that day, is to merge
the existing three organizations representing defense lawyers in
Russia into a single body, with a view to providing better
protection for their interests. Among those present in the
congressional presidium was the Russian minister of justice, Yurii
Kalmykov. The Ministry of Justice controlled the bar under Soviet
rule; and both people who have headed that ministry in Russia
since August 1991 are on record as having advocated that the
ministry should exercise control over defense lawyers in their
country.  Julia Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

PARTY OF THE MAJORITY CALLS FOR CONSTITUTIONAL MONARCHY AND
DELAYED ELECTIONS. Activists from Partiya Bolshinstva (the Party
of the Majority) have begun collecting signatures in Moscow and
other Russian cities for a referendum calling for presidential and
parliamentary elections to be postponed until 1998 and the
introduction of a constitutional monarchy in Russia, the party's
spokesman Andrei Klochkov told an RFE/RL correspondent on 12
September. The Party of the Majority was created this summer by
the St. Petersburg businessman Vyacheslav Grechnev, to be the
party of "stability, law and order, and patriotism." The party
views the 12-year-old Count Georgii Romanov as a possible
candidate for the Russian throne, with Yeltsin acting as regent,
Klochkov explained. Several Russian politicians--including the
head of the Council of the Federation, Vladimir Shumeiko, and the
mayor of St. Petersburg, Anatolii Sobchak--have already indicated
their support for a constitutional monarchy. Shumeiko also
suggested postponing the elections, which aroused controversy
among Yeltsin's supporters and opponents alike.  Victor Yasmann,
RFE/RL, Inc.

JOINT RUSSO-JAPANESE MANEUVERS. Russian and Japanese naval forces
will hold joint exercises on 14 September to practice coming to
the aid of flyers and sailors in distress, according to an
ITAR-TASS announcement of 12 September. A large Japanese
helicopter-carrying patrol ship arrived in Vladivostok that day to
take part in the exercise. It will be joined by several ships and
aircraft of the search-and-rescue service of the Russian Pacific
Fleet. The agency said that this would be the first such joint
exercise between the two countries. Meanwhile, Russian coast guard
units have continued to fire on fishing vessels encroaching
Russian territorial waters around the southern Kuril islands,
which are claimed by Japan. ITAR-TASS reported on 12 September
that several fishing boats had been detained after a Border Troops
patrol ship and helicopter had "fired for effect" when the vessels
ignored warning shots.  Doug Clarke, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA NOT PREPARED TO DEAL WITH IRAQ IN NEAR FUTURE. According to
AFP and Reuters accounts of 12 September, recent reports,
originating in the Iraqi media and suggesting that Russia was now
prepared to arrange deals with Iraq worth an estimated $10
billion, were false. While acknowledging that Moscow and Baghdad
had concluded an agreement on 9 September with a view to possibly
restoring trade, Russian officials said that any actual trade
would have to wait until such a time as sanctions against Iraq
were lifted. Foreign Ministry official Aleksandr Kalugin said that
for Russia to begin trade immediately "is at present completely
ruled out." Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIK GOVERNMENT DELEGATION MEETS WITH OPPOSITION. A Tajik
government delegation traveled to Tehran on 12 September for
discussions with the Tajik opposition in exile and representatives
of the Russian Foreign Ministry, Interfax and Western agencies
reported. The discussions are to prepare for a resumption of
formal negotiations between the Tajik government and the
opposition later in September. In keeping with a Tajik government
promise to the opposition, a senior official, Deputy Chairman of
the Supreme Soviet Abdomazhid Dostiev, heads the government
delegation. The opposition side is represented by Said Abdullo
Nuri, who heads the self-appointed government-in-exile;
Tajikistan's former top Muslim clergyman Akbar Turadzhonzoda; and
Chairman of the Coordinating Center of Democratic Forces Otakhon
Latifi.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

KYRGYZSTAN UPDATE. Kyrgyzstan's Supreme Soviet is holding an
emergency session to decide whether to resign en masse and
dissolve the parliament, Russian news agencies reported on 13
September. Earlier more than half the deputies had announced their
refusal to attend a session scheduled for later in September that
was to set a date for parliamentary elections. The previous day
Interfax reported that five democratic political parties had
withdrawn from the umbrella Congress of Democratic Forces in a
dispute over attacks on President Askar Akaev by another congress
member, Erkin Kyrgyzstan. The five parties announced they were
setting up a centrist alliance to support Akaev; Erkin Kyrgyzstan
is joining with the communist party to set up a formal opposition.
In an interview on 12 September Akaev warned that the communist
party still enjoyed considerable support in Kyrgyzstan and would
try to take power in the upcoming elections.  Bess Brown, RFE/RL,
Inc.

FORMER GEORGIAN NATIONAL BANK GOVERNOR COMMITS SUICIDE. Demur
Dvalishvili, a longtime ally of parliament chairman Eduard
Shevardnadze and as finance minister in the 1980s one of the
architects of Georgia's pioneering economic reforms, died in
hospital on 9 September after shooting himself following
preliminary questioning by the Interior Ministry concerning the
illegal extension of credits by the Georgian National Bank, of
which he resigned as chairman last year, Reuters and Interfax
reported.  Liz Fuller, RFE/RL, Inc.

                               CIS

RESULTS OF THE PRIME MINISTERS' MEETING. The 9 September meeting
of the Council of Heads of Government of the CIS states did not
bear out forecasts that Leonid Kuchma's election as Ukrainian
president and Azerbaijan's military defeats would make those
countries more amenable to Russian proposals for supranational
integration in the CIS. Kiev's delegation said on written
instructions from Kuchma that Ukrainian participation in the new
CIS Interstate Economic Committee would be limited to matters of
interest to Ukraine, in line with its associate status in the CIS
economic union. Kiev's delegates also criticized the Russian hosts
for attempting to accelerate the proceedings unduly, "which is
inadmissible when the survival of nations is at stake" (Interfax,
10 September) and objected to institutions that would "limit our
sovereignty." Ukraine declined to join the planned payments union.
Moldova agreed to join the IEC provided that body did not exercise
executive powers or take binding decisions. Azerbaijan and
Turkmenia declined to sign the documents on both the IEC and the
payments union, objecting to provisions on supranational
coordination and the transfer of the states' sovereign powers to
those structures. The two countries also declined to sign the
meeting's memorandum and long-term plan on CIS integration.
Armenia, Belarus, and Georgia on the other hand emerged as the
prime advocates of economic integration, the first two calling
additionally for the establishment of CIS citizenship.
Disappointing a number of states seeking the restoration of their
traditional access to the Russian market, Prime Minister Viktor
Chernomyrdin said that Russia would await "the necessary
preconditions" (likely to include political ones) before removing
the Russian tariff barriers to those countries' goods. Vladimir
Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

CRIMEAN PRESIDENT SEEKS TALKS WITH PARLIAMENT. In an attempt to
resolve the crisis between the executive and legislative branches,
Crimean President Yurii Meshkov has offered to hold talks with the
suspended parliament if it rescinds amendments to the Crimean
Constitution and Law on the President curtailing his powers,
ITAR-TASS reports on 12 September. But he does not intend to allow
the parliament to resume its work before the referendum on the
peninsula's new constitution, which he has decreed will be held in
April 1995. Crimean deputies have been meeting in an emergency
session in the Prosecutor-General's Office since 11 September,
when Meshkov suspended the parliament and local councils and
assumed all powers. On 12 September deputies regained access to
local broadcasting stations but were still locked out of the
parliament building. Deputy Parliamentary Chairman Viktor Mezhak
said deputies had decided to march on the building. Crimean
Minister of State Affairs Viktor Minin was quoted by ITAR-TASS on
12 September as saying agreement had been reached with Ukraine's
Interior Ministry and security service that these bodies would
remain neutral and interfere in Crimean affairs only if "disorder"
broke out. Minin also said Meshkov was ready to do everything,
"even quit his presidential post," to avert violence.  Ustina
Markus and Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

KUCHMA PROPOSES SOLUTION TO CRIMEAN CRISIS. On 12 September
ITAR-TASS quoted Crimean Parliamentary Chairman Serhii Tsekov as
saying Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma has proposed a solution
to the conflict between Crimea's parliament and President Yurii
Meshkov. According to Tsekov, Kuchma has come up with a so-called
"zero" option whereby Meshkov would rescind his 11 September
decrees and the parliament would revoke its amendments curtailing
Meshkov's power. Tsekov said Kuchma had suggested that one of his
representatives mediate in negotiations between Meshkov and the
parliament; these talks would be held on neutral territory. In a
statement issued by his press service, Kuchma offered to dispatch
a high-level negotiating team from Ukraine's central government to
resolve the crisis. Kuchma said he had to remain neutral and added
that "both sides bear responsibility for the events." Jiri Pehe,
RFE/RL, Inc.

EU ADMINISTRATOR OPENS MOSTAR BRIDGE. On 12 September EU
administrator for Bosnia and Herzegovina and former German mayor
Hans Koschnik opened a UN-constructed bridge in central Mostar,
Hina reports. The new structure replaces one destroyed during
fighting between ethnic Croats and Muslims and linking Croatian
and Muslim parts of Mostar. Koschnik, who is the alleged victim of
a 10 September assassination attempt in which a rocket was fired
through his hotel window, said he hoped the new bridge represented
"a step forward to normalization" in interethnic relations.  Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

UPDATE ON BIHAC FIGHTING. On 11 September Western agencies
reported calm in the Bihac pocket of northwestern Bosnia, where
Bosnian Serbs, supported by rebel Serbs from Croatia's Krajina
region, have recently engaged Bosnian government troops in what
was described as "intense" and "fierce" fighting. AFP reported
that UN commander General Michael Rose warned the Serb attackers
on 10 September that there would be NATO air strikes against them
if they continued with their offensives against the town of Bihac.
It remains unclear, however, whether the temporary calm was in
response to General Rose's threat. On 12 September the relative
calm was again shattered, with extensive artillery exchanges
between Serb and Muslim forces reported by Western agencies. The
shelling of the town Bihac has reportedly not resumed. Meanwhile,
Borba on 13 September reports that Serb and Muslim forces have
clashed in other areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina Stan Markotich,
RFE/RL, Inc.

PAWLAK COURTS VOIVODSHIP ASSEMBLIES . . . At a meeting with
chairmen of voivodship local government assemblies on 10 September
in Warsaw, Prime Minister Waldemar Pawlak said the government
wished to increase the powers of the voivodship assemblies by
giving them responsibility for specialized areas such as
sanitation, environment, inspection of schools, and roads, PAP
reports. These areas are currently administered by the inefficient
and much-criticized local agencies of the central government. The
assemblies perform a purely coordinating role, while the local
gmina councils wield the real power. Pawlak's Polish Peasant Party
is strongly represented in the assemblies, where the peasant lobby
is better able to promote rural interests.  Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka,
RFE/RL, Inc.

. . . WHILE MUNICIPALITIES CRITICIZE PAWLAK. The prime minister
also suggested that the pilot scheme whereby Poland's 46 largest
municipalities have taken over many administrative functions from
the central authorities should be extended to smaller towns. At a
separate meeting held the same day in Cracow, mayors of the 46
municipalities sharply criticized Pawlak's local government
policies. Gazeta Wyborcza on 12 September quoted Cracow mayor
Jozef Lassota as saying these policies would result in "a hybrid
system, with [islands of] self-government surrounded by
centralized institutions hailing from the communist past." The
mayors deplored the fact that they had not received their promised
share of central budget funds. They also claimed that since
January 1994, when the pilot scheme went into effect, the
municipalities had had to pay additional costs totaling 458
billion zloty ($20 million). Some were already considering opting
out of the program in view of the estimated shortfall of 2
trillion zloty ($90 million) in 1995. The mayors demanded a
greater share of tax revenues and continuation of public
administration reform--in particular, the introduction of the
powiat (or intermediary level of local government). Pawlak's party
is opposed to the powiat, fearing it would put rural areas at a
disadvantage.  Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL, Inc.

SECRET POLICE OFFICER ON PAROLE. Former secret police Colonel Adam
Pietruszka, sentenced in 1985 to 25 years' imprisonment
(subsequently reduced by an amnesty to 15 years) for instigating
and aiding three of his subordinates in the murder of Father Jerzy
Popieluszko, was released on parole on 9 September, PAP reports.
Pietruszka has consistently maintained he was a scapegoat. The
Wroclaw voivodship court rejected the prosecutor's demand that he
serve his full sentence, giving credence to prison officials who
pointed to his "exemplary behavior and progress in
rehabilitation." Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL, Inc.

CZECH-SLOVAK TRADE AGREEMENT UNDER PRESSURE. Meeting in the
Moravian city of Brno on 12 September, Czech Deputy Prime Minister
Ivan Kocarnik and his Slovak counterpart, Brigita Smoegnerova,
discussed the 1993 Czech-Slovak trade agreement establishing a
joint clearing account. Under this agreement, if one country's
trade deficit exceeds 130 million ecu, it has to pay the amount in
excess of that limit in hard currency. At the beginning of
September, Slovakia's trade surplus with the Czech Republic
totaled 208 million ecu. Kocarnik has ruled out a devaluation of
the Czech koruna, while Slovak officials have rejected Czech
pressure to lift an import surcharge of 10%, which Slovakia
introduced in March, or revalue the Slovak koruna. Prior to the 12
September meeting, some Czech and Slovak officials suggested that
the clearing account be abolished. However, after the meeting the
trade agreement remained in force. Slovak Finance Minister Rudolf
Filkus told journalists in Brno that the clearing account may be
abolished, as both countries' hard-currency reserves are now large
enough to conduct bilateral trade without it.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL,
Inc.

CRIME IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC DOWN. Czech media report that in the
first six months of 1994, crime dropped by 9% in comparison with
the same period of 1993. While in the first half of 1993, police
registered 194,777 criminal offenses, only 177,105 were registered
in the first six months of this year. The Ministry of Internal
Affairs reports this is the first time since the overthrow of the
communist regime, in November 1989, that the overall crime rate,
as well as rates for many categories of crime, has dropped. On the
negative side, in the first six months of 1994 the total damage
caused by crime was some 13 million koruny higher than in the same
period of 1993.  Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

LORD CHANCELLOR IN PRAGUE. Lord Mackay of Clashfern arrived in
Prague on 9 September at the invitation of Supreme Court Chairman
Otakar Motejl. Lord Mackay presides over the British parliament's
upper chamber (the House of Lords) and is cabinet member
responsible for judicial affairs. He was to discuss with Czech
officials differences and similarities between the Czech and
British legal systems. On 12 September Lord Mackay met in Brno
with Motejl and Zdenek Kessler, chairman of the Constitutional
Court, and held talks in Prague with Justice Minister Jiri Novak.
On 13 September he is to meet with President Vaclav Havel.  Jiri
Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARY STAYS AWAY FROM NATO EXERCISES. Hungarian Defense Ministry
spokesman Lieutenant Colonel Lajos Erdelyi told MTI on 12
September that his ministry lacked the necessary funds for the
army to participate in the "Cooperative Bridge 94" maneuvers in
Poland. He said two Hungarian observers would attend instead. The
exercises are the first under NATO's Partnership for Peace program
in which former East bloc countries are participating. At the
opening ceremony, US General George A. Joulwan noted that the
exercises "mark the beginning of a new chapter in the history of
NATO and Europe," Western news agencies report. The exercises are
regarded as a step toward preparing some former East bloc
countries for eventual NATO membership.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARIAN FINANCE MINISTER ON THE ECONOMY. Speaking at the
Financial and Accounting College in Budapest on 12 September,
Laszlo Bekesi estimated that the Hungarian economy needed some $10
billion in capital investment to recover, MTI reports. He was
confident that Hungary would be able to attain a mid-term
three-year loan agreement from international financial
organizations and would have access to loans with favorable terms
and interest rates. Bekesi also estimated that the country needed
to draw around $1 billion from international financial markets to
make up this year's state budget deficit, which is expected to
exceed 9% of gross domestic product.  Edith Oltay, RFE/RL, Inc.

SEVEN ARRESTED FOR ARMS DEALING IN ROMANIA. Romania's deputy
police chief, Major General Costica Voicu, told journalists on 12
September that seven persons were in custody in connection with
the attempted sale of missile parts to foreigners. Radio Bucharest
quoted Voicu as saying the seven had been arrested last week in
the town of Turnu Severin, on Romania's border with Serbia. The
suspects, all Romanian nationals, were in possession of 11
Romanian-made fuses for ground-to-air missiles, which they
allegedly wanted to sell for about $23,000. The police were
continuing to investigate the intended destination of the weapons,
Voicu added. He also disclosed that organized crime was on the
rise in Romania. In a further development, Voicu announced that
another item of precious treasure stolen last year from the Jewish
Museum in Budapest was recently found in Romania. Three persons
were detained in connection with the art theft. Most of the
missing 230 objects have been recovered and returned to Budapest.
Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

SEMINAR FOR WAR CORRESPONDENTS IN BUCHAREST. A seminar on
"Journalists in War Zones and Conflict Regions" took place in
Bucharest on 9 and 10 September. The meeting was sponsored by the
Vienna-based International Press Institute and the Romanian
Broadcasting Society. Radio Bucharest reported that the 70
journalists taking part discussed the dangers facing war
correspondents and the precautions that should be taken. The
journalists were addressed by Romanian Defense Minister Gheorghe
Tinca, who said his ministry offered self-protection courses to
Romanian correspondents working in conflict areas such as Somalia
and Rwanda.  Dan Ionescu, RFE/RL, Inc.

LUKASHENKA ESTABLISHES NATIONAL SECURITY COUNCIL. Belarusian
President Alyaksandr Lukashenka set up a National Security Council
on 9 September, Interfax reports. Permanent members include
Lukashenka, State Secretary Viktor Sheiman, Prime Minister Mikhail
Chyhir, and Deputy Parliamentary Speaker Vyacheslau Kuznetsov.
Chairman of the Supreme Soviet Mechyslau Hryb was not appointed to
the council, although he had headed the National Security
Commission under Vyacheslau Kebich's government before being
elected Supreme Soviet chairman. His exclusion is attributed to
his close association with that government and the former prime
minister. Hryb is also reportedly at odds with Lukashenka over
some presidential decrees. On 8 September he criticized a decree
of 4 August placing real estate previously controlled by the
government--including public buildings, hotels, and national
parks--under the jurisdiction of the President's Office.  Ustina
Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHOLERA REPORTED IN BELARUS. One person in Belarus has been
diagnosed as suffering from cholera, Interfax reported on 11
September. The individual had reportedly been to Turkey before
being hospitalized in Minsk. People who had been in contact with
him on the train from Turkey are being examined. Over the past
month, cholera has been reported in Russia and a number of other
CIS countries.  Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOLDOVAN-ROMANIAN DISPUTE OVER CITIZENSHIP. Moldovan officials
have told the RFE/RL Research Institute that Romania recently
granted citizenship to at least 2,000 Moldovan citizens. This
information was withheld from the Moldovan authorities, enabling
the recipients to keep their Moldovan citizenship. Moldovan law
prohibits dual citizenship unless a treaty dealing with the issue
has been signed. Chisinau resists such arrangements with Russia or
Romania for fear that Moldovan citizenship would disintegrate if
these countries (and possibly also Ukraine, Bulgaria, and Turkey)
granted citizenship to their kinsmen in Moldova. Bucharest has
ignored Chisinau's requests to cease this practice and argues that
it is merely restoring Romanian citizenship to Moldovans who lost
it through the Soviet annexation of Bessarabia. Such an argument
is inconsistent with Romania's official recognition of Moldovan
sovereignty over that territory.  Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

RUSSIA PROPOSES MILITARY ACCORDS WITH BALTICS. Russian Defense
Minister Pavel Grachev told journalists on 10 September that his
country plans to strengthen Baltic security by signing bilateral
or multilateral military cooperation accords with Estonia, Latvia,
and Lithuania, Interfax reports. Grachev said Russia is prepared
to develop the same kind of military cooperation as has been
worked out with Denmark. Last week Moscow and Copenhagen signed an
agreement providing for joint military exercises, closer civil and
military links, and the exchange of information.  Dzintra Bungs,
RFE/RL, Inc.

ESTONIA HOPES FOR CSCE SUPPORT ON BORDER ISSUES. Estonian Prime
Minister Mart Laar has told the parliament that he is pinning his
hopes on the CSCE to help find a solution to the Estonian-Russian
border problems. Since the signing in July of the bilateral
accords on the withdrawal of Russian troops from Estonia, Russia
has pressed ahead with the unilateral demarcation of what it
perceives to be its border with Estonia. This border encompasses
Estonian territory annexed by the RSFSR after World War II. Laar
added it would be difficult to raise this issue at the UN, where
the backing of at least 10 states is required. As for the
International Court of Justice in The Hague, Estonia needs
Russia's consent to take the issue there, BNS reported on 12
September.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

4,000 RUSSIAN SERVICEMEN STILL IN LATVIA? Interfax and LETA
reported on 9 September that according to Latvian estimates, there
are about 4,000 former Russian servicemen still living with their
families in Latvia. These troops were discharged from the military
after 28 January 1992 and were supposed to leave the country
before 31 August 1994, when the last Russian army units withdrew.
Prime Minister Valdis Birkavs said that although he expects many
of them will attempt to stay in Latvia and legalize their presence
there, they must leave for Russia by 31 December 1994. Russian
sources indicate that there are only 1,115 Russian servicemen in
Latvia. Because of their continued presence in that country, the
Latvian agency supervising the withdrawal of the Russian troops
will continue its work.  Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

  [As of 1200 CET]
  Compiled by Eileen Downing and Jan Cleave
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
Institute (a division of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Inc.)
with the assistance of the RFE/RL News and Current Affairs
Division, is available through electronic mail by subscribing to
RFERL-L at LISTSERV@UBVM.CC.BUFFALO.EDU.  This report is also
available by postal mail, as are the other publications of the
Institute, and by fax.  RFE/RL NEWS BRIEFS, an edited compendium
of items first published in the Daily Report, is distributed
along with the RFE/RL RESEARCH REPORT, a weekly journal
providing topical analyses of political, economic and security
developments throughout the Institute's area of interest.
Longer analyses are available in a monograph series, RFE/RL
STUDIES, and brief analytic summaries appear monthly in the
RESEARCH BULLETIN.

Requests for permission to reprint or retransmit this material
should be addressed to PD@RFERL.ORG and will generally be
granted on the condition that the material is clearly attributed
to the RFE/RL DAILY REPORT. Inquiries about specific news items
or subscriptions to RFE/RL publications should be directed as
follows (please include your full postal address when inquiring
about subscriptions):

In North America:

Mr. Brian Reed
RFE/RL, Inc.
1201 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: (202) 457-6912 or -6907
Fax: (202) 457-6992 or 828-8783
Internet: RI-DC@RFERL.ORG

Elsewhere:

Ms. Helga Hofer
Publications Department
RFE/RL Research Institute
Oettingenstrasse 67
80538 Munich
Germany
Telephone: (+49 89) 2102-2631 or -2632
Fax: (+49 89) 2102-2648
Internet: PD@RFERL.ORG

Copyright 1994, RFE/RL, Inc. All rights reserved.


[English] [Russian TRANS | KOI8 | ALT | WIN | MAC | ISO5]

F&P Home ° Comments ° Guestbook


1996 Friends and Partners
Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole
Please visit the Russian and American mirror sites of Friends and Partners.
Updated: 1998-11-

Please write to us with your comments and suggestions.

F&P Quick Search
Main Sections
Home
Bulletin Board
Chat Room
F&P Listserver

RFE/RL
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
Search

News
News From Russia/NIS
News About Russia/NIS
Newspapers & Magazines
Global News
Weather

©1996 Friends and Partners
Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole