Wherever there is love, there is peace. - Burmese proverb
RFE/RL Daily Report

No. 161, 25 August 1994

                              RUSSIA

DEFENSE MINISTRY COMPLAINS OF MEDIA DISTORTIONS. The Russian
Defense Ministry issued a public statement on 24 August
criticizing what it described as "a wave of critical articles" in
the media about the situation in the armed forces and alleged
tensions among top military leaders and between them and civilian
authorities. The statement lamented the fact that Defense Minister
Pavel Grachev appears to be a favorite target of such reports, and
criticized impressions conveyed by the media that the army is in
an "explosive state," is reeling out of control, or that it
harbors potential putschists. The statement also deplored reports
of corruption among military leaders and denied that military
units in the "near abroad" have emerged as autonomous forces whose
activities have stirred up interethnic and internal conflicts. The
statement, which was published in the main Defense Ministry
newspaper, Krasnaya zvezda, suggested that such media reports
threatened to politicize the army and to exacerbate the problems
that the army inherited from its Soviet predecessor. - Stephen
Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

. . . AS ADDITIONAL RUMORS OF IMPENDING RESHUFFLE ARE REPORTED. As
if in defiance of the Defense Ministry statement, Rossiiskiye
vesti of 25 August published an article speculating that the
commander of the Russian forces in Germany, Col.-Gen. . . . Matvei
Burlakov, would be at the center of any planned reshuffle of the
military leadership. Quoting unofficial sources, the newspaper
said that he had been considered in recent months for a variety of
top positions, including General Staff chief, Deputy Defense
Minister, commander of the key Moscow Military District, or
military advisor to the Russian president. Komsomolskaya pravda of
24 August had also said that Burlakov was in line for a top post
(see RFE/RL Daily Report of 24 August). Finally, Rossiiskiye vesti
claimed that some observers believe Defense Minister Grachev is
himself to be replaced, and they named the current commander of
Russia's Border Forces, Col.- Gen. Andrei Nikolaev, as a likely
candidate. The newspaper said that the former General Staff first
deputy chief has emerged as a well-known and respected media
personality. - Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

LOCAL PROTEST AGAINST RUSSIAN-US EXERCISE. Several days after
pro-Communist activists in Moscow threatened to disrupt a planned
Russian-US peacekeeping exercise (see RFE/RL Daily Report of 22
August), local leaders in the Orenburg region of Russia, where the
maneuvers are to commence in early September, have reportedly
expressed opposition to the exercises. According to AFP, ITAR-TASS
of 24 August quoted Viktor Nefedov, the vice chairman of the
Orenburg regional assembly, as saying that the exercise was likely
to provoke protests by local residents and that the assembly had
approved a resolution declaring the maneuvers undesirable. The
assembly also drafted a letter to Boris Yeltsin which calls for
canceling the exercises, he said. Radical right- and left-wing
leaders have consistently opposed the maneuvers, which are to
involve only 500 soldiers altogether, and it is difficult to say
if their public statements--or the actions of the
assembly--reflect genuine local opposition to the maneuvers. -
Stephen Foye, RFE/RL, Inc.

A SECOND RUSSIAN ARMY IN MOLDOVA. Interviewed in Rossiiskiye vesti
of 23 August, the "Dniester republic"'s Defense Minister,
Stanislav Khazheev, detailed the structure of the "Dniester" armed
forces. The active forces consist of an "army" plus a border
guard, a special force battalion of the Internal Affairs Ministry,
a spetsnaz battalion of the State Security Ministry, and a Cossack
"regiment." Aggregate manpower is "no less than that of the 14th
Army" (which currently has 10,000 servicemen, according to
Col.-General Eduard Vorobev, first deputy commander-in-chief of
Russia's land forces). Some "Dniester" units were taken over in
their entirety from the 14th Army, Khazheev said. The"Dniester"
forces were the first in the former USSR to switch fully to the
contract principle of recruitment as early as 1992, Khazheev said,
without specifying who bore the costs. More recently they have
resumed conscription to supplement contract recruitment. "Almost
all" servicemen have "dual citizenship," "Dniester" and Russian.
The regular forces are supplemented by reserve units formed in
industrial enterprises, who undergo periodic refresher training
and whose members keep weapons and uniforms at home and may not be
dismissed from work by their employers. "The "Dniester" military
doctrine and legislation, organization, uniforms, "and everything
else" is the same as in Russia because "otherwise it would be
difficult to reunite with it," Khazheev said. In the same issue of
Rossiiskiye vesti, "Dniester republic" Vice-President Aleksandr
Karaman termed the region "a western outpost of Russia." -
Vladimir Socor, RFE/RL, Inc.

GORBACHEV NOT TO BE PROSECUTED FOR COLLAPSE OF THE USSR. On 24
August Ostankino TV news reported a statement of the Moscow
prosecutor's office saying that no criminal charges will be filed
in connection with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. This
statement was a response to a formal request to the Russian
Prosecutor-General by General Valentin Varennikov, an organizer of
the August 1991 attempted coup against former USSR President
Mikhail Gorbachev. Varennikov was recently found not guilty of
high treason. In his request to the Prosecutor-General, Varennikov
claimed that Gorbachev should be prosecuted because his negligence
had brought about the collapse of the Soviet Union. - Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

DEMOCRATIC RUSSIA APPEALS TO MMM SHAREHOLDERS? The co-chairmen of
Democratic Russia, Galina Starovoitova and Lev Ponomarev, were
quoted by Russian TV newscasts on 24 August as having asked Acting
Russian Prosecutor-General Aleksei Ilyushenko to release on bail
Sergei Mavrodi, the president of the MMM pyramid stock company.
Mavrodi is currently in jail charged with non-payment of taxes,
while thousands of MMM shareholders stage rallies in front of
various government offices in Moscow, demanding Mavrodi's release
and reimbursement for the cost of their shares. In their appeal to
Ilyushenko, the leaders of Democratic Russia alleged that Mavrodi
was no more responsible for the hardships of MMM shareholders than
was the government. Once a mass political movement that claimed
credit for the rise of Boris Yeltsin to the Russian presidency,
most recently Democratic Russia has lost its popularity, and has
been unable to attract more than 200 people to its rallies.
Appealing to the sentiments of MMM fans may be a way for the
movement to regain some of its mass support. - Julia Wishnevsky,
RFE/RL, Inc.

CHECHNYA SIGNS AGREEMENT WITH DON COSSACKS. Chechen President
Dzhokhar Dudaev signed an agreement on friendship and cooperation
with Don Cossack chieftain Nikolai Kozitsyn, ITAR-TASS reported on
24 August. The agreement consists of 25 articles, covering
political, economic and ecological cooperation, as well as joint
efforts in crime fighting. Dudaev and Kozitsyn told the media they
were sure the agreement would benefit all the peoples of the
Northern Caucasus. - Vera Tolz, RFE/RL, Inc.

ATTEMPTED HIJACKING STOPPED IN BASHKORTOSTAN. A man attempted to
hijack a bus near Ufa in Bashkortostan on 24 August, according to
Russian TV newscasts. The hijacker was reported to have demanded a
ransom of between 2 and 10 million rubles ($1-5 thousand) but was
stopped by the police who rescued the hostages. In contrast to
several attempted hijackings that have taken place in the North
Caucasian resort Mineralnye Vody earlier this year, the culprit in
the latest case was not a Chechen but a Russian. - Julia
Wishnevsky, RFE/RL, Inc.

CHOLERA OUTBREAK CONTINUES IN DAGESTAN. Director of the Russian
State Committee for Sanitary-Epidemiology Inspection, Evgenii
Belyaev, said it would take until mid-October to bring the current
cholera outbreak in the North Caucasian republic of Dagestan under
control, Reuters reported on 24 August. He told a news conference
in Moscow that cholera has killed at least 17 people in the
republic since it broke out in July. Belyaev said at least 686
more people in Dagestan are now suffering from the disease and an
about equal number is carrying it. - Vera Tolz, RFE/RL, Inc.

MOSCOW, BELGRADE SIGN AGREEMENTS. On 24 August ITAR-TASS reported
that Belgrade officials and their Moscow counterparts signed two
agreements focusing on economic, technical and scientific
cooperation that will take effect as soon as sanctions are lifted
against rump Yugoslavia. Interfax said of the 22-24 meetings held
in Moscow between a Serbian delegation headed by Serbian Prime
Minister Mirko Marjanovic and Moscow officials, that Moscow and
Belgrade have agreed to restore full "bilateral trade and economic
cooperation" once the sanctions are removed. Included in the
restoration of ties, Marjanovic told Interfax, is a scheme to
build a pipeline to transport Russian gas to Serbia. Belgrade will
reportedly spend some $350 million on this project. - Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

                  TRANSCAUCASIA AND CENTRAL ASIA

TAJIKISTAN UPDATE. Commander-in-Chief of Russia's Border Guards
Andrei Nikolaev and Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Albert
Chernyshov flew to Dushanbe on 24 August to discuss the situation
in Tajikistan in the wake of the largest clash this year between
Russian border troops and Tajik opposition forces on the
Tajik-Afghan border, Interfax reported. The two officials met with
Tajik head of state Imomali Rakhmonov, and Interfax quoted
Nikolaev as asserting that no reinforcements of the troops on the
Tajik-Afghan border are necessary at present. Chernyshov said that
Russia is urging a resumption of talks between the Tajik
government and the opposition. The same day Tajik opposition
leader and former top clergyman in Tajikistan Akbar Turadzhonzoda
told an Interfax interviewer that the opposition considers the
upcoming presidential election illegal and is calling on
opposition supporters to boycott it. He said that the opposition
will soon renew its offensive on the Tajik-Afghan border because
it has no other way to dislodge the Dushanbe regime. - Bess Brown,
RFE/RL, Inc.

TWO NEWSPAPERS CLOSED IN KYRGYZSTAN. RL's Kyrgyz Service learned
on 23 August that Kyrgyzstan's Minister of Justice Mukar
Cholponbaev has ordered the state publishing house in Bishkek to
cease printing the independent Russian-language newspaper
Politika. The publication's chief editor, Chynara Dzakypova, noted
that the ban was instituted without a court decision and described
it as a step toward dictatorship. The previous week a Bishkek
court banned Svobodnye gory, the official newspaper of
Kyrgyzstan's parliament. President Askar Akaev had sought the ban
on the grounds that Svobodnye gory and other publications were
irresponsible in their reporting and were contributing to the
destabilization of the country. - Bess Brown, RFE/RL, Inc.

                    CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

ETHNIC CLEANSING CONTINUES IN BIJELJINA. Reuters reports that on
23 August Bosnian Serb forces drove 250 Muslims out of the east
Bosnian Bijeljina region, in what appears to be a renewed and
concerted round of ethnic cleansing. This brings the total
expulsions over the last five weeks up to an estimated 735. If
they continue at the same rate, according to one UN spokesman, the
ethnic cleansing could be "complete in some ten weeks." It is
believed that Vojislav Djurkovic, or Vojkan as he is also known, a
major in the Bosnian Serb army, is largely responsible for the
recent waves of expulsions in Bijeljina. Bijeljina was captured by
Bosnian Serb forces in April 1992, and subjected at that time to
intense anti-Muslim campaigns. It is estimated that no more than
3,000 Muslims remain in the region. - Stan Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

BOSNIAN REFUGEES ASKED TO RETURN TO BIHAC. On 25 August The
Independent reports that Croatian Foreign Minister Mate Granic and
his Bosnian counterpart, Irfan Ljubijankic, met in Zagreb to
discuss the recent refugee problem created by the defeat at the
hands of the Bosnian army of rebel Muslim leader Fikret Abdic.
According to some estimates, at least 25,000 refugees have flooded
out of the Bihac pocket, Abdic's former stronghold, and are camped
in Serb-controlled Croatia or Krajina, with many hoping for asylum
in the West. Many of the refugees have expressed fears of
reprisals, and have accused the Bosnian army of atrocities.
Croatia has refused transit and both Granic and Ljubijankic agreed
at their meeting to insist on the refugees' return to Bihac.
According to Reuters on 14 August, Granic said the main obligation
was to "provide [the refugees] with the necessary guarantees for
their safety," while Ljubijankic stressed "it is in their best
interest to go home." Radio Sarajevo reported that the Bosnian
government has offered amnesty to the refugees, but rebel leader
Abdic himself will be tried for treason if apprehended. - Stan
Markotich, RFE/RL, Inc.

GREECE TURNS DOWN TIRANA OFFER . . . Greek Prime Minister Andreas
Papandreou on 24 August turned down an Albanian offer to hold
talks about the current bilateral crisis, triggered by an
espionage trial against five ethnic Greeks in Tirana. Government
spokesman Evangelos Venizelos told a press conference in Athens
that Albanian President Sali Berisha, who had suggested the talks,
seemed to misunderstand both "his role and the way states conduct
their international relations." Venizelos said Greece would
nevertheless refrain from following Tirana's example and recall
its ambassador for consultations. Meanwhile, the CSCE High
Commissioner on National Minorities, Max van der Stoel, is trying
to mediate in the crisis. After meeting Berisha on 24 August, van
der Stoel traveled on to Athens. Western media carried the
reports. - Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

. . . AND REJECTS AIRSPACE VIOLATION CHARGES. Also on 24 August,
Reuters quoted officials in Athens as denying a Macedonian claim
that a Greek military aircraft flew seven kilometers into its air
space on the previous day. The Greek foreign and defense
ministries both issued statements denying the overflight, with the
former protesting that the charge was made in the name of
"Macedonia." Maintaining that only its own northern province has
the right to that denomination, Athens insists that the country is
called "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia," at least until a
compromise is found. - Kjell Engelbrekt, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLISH INTERIOR MINISTER DEFENDS SPY'S APPOINTMENT. Interior
Minister Andrzej Milczanowski broke his leave for one day on 23
August to clear up misunderstandings within the government over
the appointment of Marian Zacharski, the spy who procured American
military technology for communist Poland, as head of civil
intelligence. Milczanowski said the decision had been his and
President Lech Walesa had known nothing about the appointment, PAP
reports. He said that he stood by his decision, and still hoped
the prime minister would not accept the resignation of Zacharski,
who, he said, was "a top class professional," and had proven his
loyalty since 1989 in the service of the State Security Office. He
denied the appointment could jeopardize Poland's access to NATO,
as suggested by Foreign Minister Andrzej Olechowski. No consensus
was reached and Milczanowski said he would speak with President
Lech Walesa next week. - Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL, Inc.

POLAND TO VOTE AGAINST ABORTION IN CAIRO. Foreign Minister Andrzej
Olechowski said at a press conference in Warsaw on 24 August that
the Polish delegation to the UN population conference opening
shortly in Cairo will vote in line with current Polish legal norms
on that part of the conference's final document that deals with
abortion, which means against using abortion as a means of birth
control, PAP reports. A majority of deputies from three Sejm
commissions criticized such an approach as unrepresentative of
Polish public opinion, and demanded to know the composition of the
delegation. Recent legislative amendments that would allow
abortion on demand for social reasons were vetoed by President
Lech Walesa. Although Sejm commissions voted on 24 August to
reject the veto, the actual outcome of the vote on the Sejm floor
is uncertain, as a two-thirds majority is required to overrule the
veto. Walesa's legal spokesman said that the president would not
sign the amendments even if his veto were overruled, and was
prepared to go before the Constitutional Tribunal to defend his
arguments. At a 23 August press conference, the Chairman of the
Polish Episcopate's commission for family matters, Bishop
Stanislaw Stefanek, presented the Catholic stance on the issues to
be discussed in Cairo, denouncing "demographic imperialism," and
reasserting ethic principles. - Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka, RFE/RL,
Inc.

CZECH GOVERNMENT APPROVES DRAFT LAWS. On 24 August, the Czech
government approved a draft law on the powers of higher
administrative units known as regions. The decision was preceded
by months of acrimonious debate among Czech political parties and
leaders on the need to subdivide the Czech republic into regions
and on region's powers vis-a-vis the central government. The draft
must still be approved by parliament. CTK reported on 24 August
that Premier Vaclav Klaus had insisted that the draft law be
passed as a constitutional amendment, which would require a
three-fifth majority in the parliament. The government also
approved a compensation package for Czech victims of Nazi
persecution during World War II. Klaus told a press conference in
Prague that under the terms of the package, legitimate claimants
(victims themselves or their surviving spouses) would receive a
one-time payment of 2,300 koruny ($90) for each month spent in
Nazi prisons. This draft must also be approved by parliament. -
Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK GENERAL ON CZECH, SLOVAK AIR FORCES. In an interview with
CTK on 25 August, Slovak Maj. Gen. Stefan Gombik, the commander of
Slovakia's air forces, questioned Czech plans to modernize
obsolete MiG-21 fighter planes rather than buy modern MiG-29
fighter planes. "I would never support such a solution in
Slovakia," he said, claiming that one MiG-29 fully replaced four
MiG-21 planes, and that it was better to rely on a small number of
highly trained pilots flying modern planes, than have a large
number of pilots flying obsolete planes. Gombik also expressed
bewilderment over the Czech army's plans to start using as fighter
planes the L-159 planes, which have until now been used only in
training. "I do not know who conceived this idea; I cannot imagine
this plane as a fighter plane," he said. His comments echo those
of some Czech politicians and experts who have criticized the
Czech army's plans in this respect. CTK reports that Slovakia
currently has 16 MiG-29 planes, six of which the country received
from Russia as a form of payment for the Russian debt to Slovakia.
The Slovak Army also has some 70 MiG-21 fighter planes, 20 Su-22
fighter bombers, and a dozen Su-25 fighter planes. The squadron
flying MiG-29 planes is a candidate for membership in the World
Association of Tiger Squadrons, an elite group of highly trained
fighter pilots. - Jiri Pehe, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK ARMY COMMANDER ON PLANS FOR MODERNIZATION. On 24 August
Slovak Army Commander-in-Chief, Lt. Gen. Julius Humaj, announced
plans to modernize the Slovak army in three stages by the year
2000, domestic media report. By the end of 1995 structural changes
should be completed, leaving the army with 46,667 men; surplus
weapons have already been gathered and are ready for liquidation
or sale. The second stage: modernizing the country's current
arsenal, will last until 1996 or 1997; new purchases are not being
considered. During this stage, the proportion of professional
soldiers will be increased, reaching 60% by the year 2000. The
third stage includes continued modernization of weapon systems and
improvement of organizational structures so that by the year 2000,
Slovakia's army will be "small but well-armed and well-trained,"
Humaj said. - Sharon Fisher, RFE/RL, Inc.

SLOVAK NATIONAL PROPERTY FUND REPORT. At a 24 August press
conference National Property Fund (FNM) President Rudolf Janac
said the fund now administers property worth 59.729 billion
koruny, has ownership rights in 583 firms and holds 1.1 billion
koruny of deposits in Slovak banks. Janac noted that as of 22
August various firms owed the FNM 1.138 billion koruny, and
discussed ways to force these companies to repay their debts. The
fund has earned more than 25 million koruny by selling shares
unsold in the first phase of coupon privatization; a total of
71.3% of these shares have now been sold. Still, prices in the
over-the-counter RM System have been falling and are not expected
to pick up until late 1994 or early 1995. The second phase of
coupon privatization should begin on 5 September. - Sharon Fisher,
RFE/RL, Inc.

HUNGARY PLANS DRASTIC ENERGY INCREASES. Nepszabadsag reported on
23 August that state-owned producers have proposed price increases
of 52.5% for electricity and 76.6% for natural gas for private
consumers, effective October 1994. Although the actual level of
increases and their step-by-step introduction is still under
debate, the ruling Hungarian Socialist Party said the measure was
required to eliminate all subsidies by 1996. - Karoly Okolicsanyi,
RFE/RL, Inc.

MORE ON BUDAPEST'S PAST TERRORIST CONNECTIONS. Nepszava on 24
August quoted an unnamed retired Hungarian intelligence officer as
saying that Abu Nidal, one of the world's most wanted terrorists,
stayed in Budapest during the early 1980s. The officer also said
that Hungarian authorities avoided confrontation with Abu Nidal
fearing reprisal attacks on Hungarian installations at home and
abroad. - Karoly Okolicsanyi, RFE/RL, Inc.

ZHELEV SLAMS SOCIALISTS. In a sharply worded statement issued on
24 August, President Zheleyu Zhelev attacked the Bulgarian
Socialist Party for trying to exploit dissatisfaction in the army
for short-term political ends, BTA reports. The statement accused
the Socialist leadership--which is seeking the dismissal of
Defense Minister Valentin Aleksandrov after he ordered the
retirement of 300 colonels--of whipping up discontent among
officers instead of solving a range of pressing defense-related
problems. Zhelev called on the BSP to use its strong leverage over
parliament and the cabinet to speed up the reform process, and to
spend less time criticizing others. Several papers on 25 August
quote the chairman of the Bulgarian Legion "Georgi Rakovski" as
agreeing with Zhelev that focusing solely on retirement issues
means evading the true problems of the army. - Kjell Engelbrekt,
RFE/RL, Inc.

PRNU FAVORS HUNGARIAN TREATY BUT REJECTS DEMANDS. Romanian Foreign
Minister Teodor Melescanu met with leaders of the Party of
Romanian National Unity on 24 August and discussed his forthcoming
visit to Budapest (5 September) and the negotiations with Hungary
on the basic treaty between the two countries. After the meeting,
the PRNU's Deputy Chairman Ioan Gavra said at a press conference
broadcast on Radio Bucharest that the views of the Foreign
Ministry and those of his party "coincide." The PRNU, he said,
supports a treaty recognizing the inviolability of the present
borders and granting national minorities rights "reflecting
international standards." He also said granting such rights
depended on the "unconditional loyalty" of members of the
minorities towards the state in which they live. The RFE/RL
correspondent in Bucharest quoted Gavra as saying that the treaty
would not answer the demands of the Hungarian minority for
bilingual street signs and a Hungarian university. The extreme
nationalist PRNU, which joined the government last week, has
consistently opposed such demands. - Michael Shafir, RFE/RL, Inc.

REACTIONS TO SEVASTOPOL'S CLAIM TO RUSSIAN STATUS. On 24 August
agencies reported on reactions to the Sevastopol City Council's
decision to give the city Russian status. The deputy head of the
analytical center of the Russian Federation, Mark Urnov, said that
Russia had no intention of interfering in Ukraine's internal
affairs and that it respected the principle of territorial
integrity. Ukraine's president Leonid Kuchma reacted calmly saying
he regretted the move and such decisions could only be made at the
state, not local, level. He advocated negotiation with the
Sevastopol authorities rather than use of force. Nationalist
organizations in Ukraine have taken a harder line. One of Rukh's
leaders, Ivan Zayets, reportedly said that Kiev must act
resolutely to teach separatists a lesson. - Ustina Markus, RFE/RL,
Inc.

KAZAKH DEFENSE MINISTER IN KIEV. During an official visit to
Ukraine, Kazakh Defense Minister Sagadat Nurmagambetov met with
President Leonid Kuchma and Defense Minister Vitalii Radetsky,
Ukrainian radio reported on 23 August. An agreement on military
cooperation should be signed in the near future. Radetsky said
they also discussed disarmament since both countries have nuclear
weapons, and possible barter trade. Nurmagambetov had fought in
Ukraine during World War II. - Ustina Markus, RFE/RL, Inc.

LITHUANIAN SOLDIERS TO CROATIA AS PEACEKEEPERS. On 22 August 32
Lithuanian soldiers flew from Denmark to Croatia as part of a
Danish battalion in the UN peace-keeping forces stationed in the
Krajina region, the RFE/RL Lithuanian Service reported on 24
August. Povilas Malakauskas, the director of the international and
internal relations department of the Lithuanian Defense Ministry,
said that the soldiers, who received special training in both
Lithuania and Denmark, will be paid $300-500 per month for their
planned six-month term of duty. They will form the core of the
Lithuanian part of the joint Baltic UN peace-keeping battalion
that will be formed in 1995. - Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

DISMANTLING OF PALDISKI REACTOR BEGINS. On 24 August Russian
scientists opened one of the two nuclear reactors at the former
Soviet submarine base at Paldiski and began removing its 200 fuel
rods, BNS reports. No increased radiation was reported during the
opening of the reactor's cover. The removal of the fuel is
expected to take about 1.5 months. According to an
Estonian-Russian agreement signed on 30 July, the dismantling of
the two reactors is to be completed by 30 September 1995. The
Estonian government issued a decree establishing special security
conditions on the Pakri peninsula, where the base is located,
during the dismantling period allowing only permanent residents,
local employees, and people with special permits to enter the
area. - Saulius Girnius, RFE/RL, Inc.

KARASIN: RUSSIA NEED NOT APOLOGIZE FOR EVENTS 50 YEARS AGO.
Commenting on publications in connection with the 55th anniversary
of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, which served to divide Europe into
Soviet and German spheres of influence, Russian Foreign Ministry
spokesman Grigorii Karasin told Interfax on 23 August that "Russia
does not believe it has anything to apologize for, and all the
more so since the events took place more than fifty years ago."
Objecting to linkage between those events and contemporary Russia
by portraying it as a successor to imperial-style policies,
Karasin said the Russian Foreign Ministry's activities are guided
by "the post-war arrangement in Europe based on the UN Charter,
enshrined in peace treaties and reaffirmed by the Helsinki Act and
the Paris Charter for a New Europe" and asserted that Russia's
foreign policy is formulated according to present-day
international law. - Dzintra Bungs, RFE/RL, Inc.

  [As of 1200 CET]

  Compiled by Bess Brown and Anna Sabbat-Swidlicka
The RFE/RL DAILY REPORT, produced by the RFE/RL Research
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Please write to us with any comments, questions or suggestions -- Natasha Bulashova, Greg Cole